Art: Tone Drawing / Form Drawing
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Tone Drawing / Form Drawing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Sydney Australia
    Posts
    6
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Tone Drawing / Form Drawing

    Hello,
    I just wanted to share some thoughts with the community regarding Tonal Drawing and Form Drawing.

    I was hoping some people could upload some examples of their Tonal Drawings as well as Form drawings and to share thoughts on the matter.

    I think Tonal drawings a very popular and beautiful; I am sad to see that there is not much Form Drawing around.

    I find that Form Drawing is more important to me because I am a Digital Sculptor and my primary concern is geometry and structure. I think that you can lose a sense/understanding of form if you just copy tone.

    I like Form Drawing because the geometry can be illuminated by any light source you can imagine - but in tone drawing, you must copy what the light source is.

    Can some Teachers please post tutorials on Form Vs Tone?

    Is Tonal Drawing merely an exercise in copying tonal vales?
    In a Tone Drawing, can you still take steps to understand the form regardless of the objects illumination?
    Why do you think Form Drawing is overlooked?
    How is tone used selectively in form drawing to maximize form?

    Example of a tonal drawings = John Singer Sargent
    Example of a Form Drawing = G W Lambert

    Attached Images Attached Images    
    --
    Stephen Davidson
    "Imagination is more important than knowledge. For while knowledge defines all we currently know and understand, imagination points to all we might yet discover and create." Albert Einstein
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    30
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 16 Times in 10 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hi

    I'm partly a classical drawing teacher, and for me there is actually no difference between the two kinds of drawing... -Or you might say that I think the division is purely analytical, but in your practical use of drawing, there is only drawing.

    Maybe my thoughts can be illustrated by an incident a had with a student one day.
    He came from a school which you might would call "tonal".
    I told him some things to correct in a drawing he did at that school, to better show the form of what he was drawing, but he answered some thing like "But we don't use this kind of approach".
    -Much like the thinking you are proposing. But still, no matter what name he would give his approach to drawing, he would still benefit from my corrections. even though he might would call them structural, or something like that.

    I guess that what I'm in some way trying to say, is that even though some artists might focus more on illusion than understanding, (see my mindmap on this subject here), everybody is actually just concerned about creating the illusion of a 3d form, on a 2d surface.

    Or you might say that a good "tonal drawing" is good if it shows structural knowledge, and a good "structural drawing" is good because it renders the structural knowledge through tone.
    -Which is all the same.

    Even though I can't stand the work of Ingres, I read a quote from him somewhere here on CA, which I feel would be appropriate here. It goes something like this:
    "There is no correct drawing, only beautiful drawing"


    Cheers, and a happy new year!

    www.rasmusaagaard.com

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    mazing!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Berlin
    Posts
    107
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 23 Times in 21 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    In Juliette Aristides new book she talks about the 2 elements of darks and lights in a drawing/painting. First is a str8 2 dimensional design element where you look at dark shapes vs light shapes without developing them to show depth of space. This is important as this is what will create interest in your work with rhythmic patterns. Think of like a base line or drum beat in a song. Without a good base line or beat a song lacks a lot of body although you don t immediately hear it when its part of the whole ensemble.

    Next is creating the illusion of depth and space. I went to visit the Grand Central Academy this summer to check out the opening of their student show and got chatting with one of their students. Despite working a ton from a model or a cast a ton the instructors push students to think sculpturally on the page. Observe AND conceptualize the light on the what it is your drawing so you can both do a faithful drawing from observation but also create a most convincing illusion of depth. But sculpturally I mean you think of pushing the form away from the light in 3d space as you render shadows and pulling the form towards the light in 3d space in the lights.

    https://picasaweb.google.com/1136518...29777086485634

    The student work is incredible and its even more ridic in person I assure you.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •