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  1. #1
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    The traditional side of things.

    Hey guys, I'm sure there's a specific part of the forums for this question, but after around ten minutes of browsing to no avail, I decided to post it here with the word 'miscellaneous' in mind.
    I have been instructed by somewhat exasperated teachers to pick up a paintbrush and do something "proper" (I've argued that science fiction and computers are the future and much less messy, but when it comes down to it, they give me marks if I work with real paint, so I can't really argue).
    I've not really worked with paints for a year or two (and considering the fact that I'm 17, that's a long time) and before that it I was using finger paints, I still wore spiderman pants, and I thought girls had the lurgys.
    Getting to the point now, what I need from you guys is recommendations on what paint I should use, acrylic or oil (although I know oil takes a long time to dry). What colours I need (considering I don't own anything but black spray paint, I need to know whether I need to buy anything but red, blue and yellow).
    I'm working on cardboard sort of stuff, its like card but a few millimetres thick. So fine grain and dense rather than corrugated.

    So yeah, to sum up, I need to know:
    1. What type of paint I need (maybe a brand recommendation)
    2. What colours I need

    If there's anything else I need or have forgotten that I don't know about, please tell me (act like I'm an idiot, all I own is a paintbrush, and I can fold up a few pieces of paper or something to use as a pallet).
    Ta in advance.

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  3. #2
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    You need the Fine Arts section.

    Oils - http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=98647

    Acrylics - http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=101119

    I'm moving this to Art Discussion as well.

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  5. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black Spot View Post
    I'm moving this to Art Discussion as well.
    sigh...

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  6. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by eezacque@xs4all.nl View Post
    sigh...
    Pray why l'sigh? The lounge is not the place.

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  7. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyNSWOrLD View Post
    So yeah, to sum up, I need to know:
    1. What type of paint I need (maybe a brand recommendation)
    2. What colours I need
    Here's what you need to know:
    1. The artists that you like and types of work they do.
    2. How they do it.

    This is really your own investigation and not something we can advise you on. Figuring out who inspires you, at this particular stage, leads to the answers. I doubt you would find David Leffel, Richard Schmid or even Sargent terribly interesting.

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  9. #6
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    Did your teachers even tell you where to begin? If you think you can fold up a piece of paper for a palette you're doing it wrong. If you haven't already, ask them for advice. And as fustrating as learning traditional painting was for me, it's worth learning, I'll probably get back into it myself soon.

    My sketchbook:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=191977

    My page on Facebook, which I update much more often.

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  11. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by stabby2486 View Post
    Did your teachers even tell you where to begin? If you think you can fold up a piece of paper for a palette you're doing it wrong. If you haven't already, ask them for advice. And as fustrating as learning traditional painting was for me, it's worth learning, I'll probably get back into it myself soon.
    What should I use instead? I know I'm new to traditional stuff, but I don't see the difference between a piece of paper and a posh £100 varnished wood pallet.
    Here's what you need to know:
    1. The artists that you like and types of work they do.
    2. How they do it.

    This is really your own investigation and not something we can advise you on. Figuring out who inspires you, at this particular stage, leads to the answers. I doubt you would find David Leffel, Richard Schmid or even Sargent terribly interesting.
    I have artists I like, but it's not really inspiration or how I should go about this that I need, its more technical stuff, like:
    What should I work on?
    What should I work with?
    That sort of thing...
    Just out of interest, why did you think I wouldn't like those artists? I quite liked David Leffel's stuff (although it was just a cursory glance at a google image search). I said I liked science fiction, but that doesn't mean I don't like other stuff too.

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  12. #8
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    You mean your teachers want you to use paint but they don't want to teach you how to use them? Why are they called TEACHers exactly?

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  14. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyNSWOrLD View Post
    What should I use instead? I know I'm new to traditional stuff, but I don't see the difference between a piece of paper and a posh £100 varnished wood pallet.
    Well, you certainly don't need anything that costs £100, but what do you think the differences are between a folded up piece of paper and a piece of varnished wood, and why do you think that would matter?
    Read the threads Black Spot linked to, and the threads that are linked in them. Most of your questions are answered there, and, for those that aren't, you'll at least know the search terms to use to find them.


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  15. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RyNSWOrLD View Post
    What should I use instead? I know I'm new to traditional stuff, but I don't see the difference between a piece of paper and a posh £100 varnished wood pallet.

    I have artists I like, but it's not really inspiration or how I should go about this that I need, its more technical stuff, like:
    What should I work on?
    What should I work with?
    That sort of thing...
    Just out of interest, why did you think I wouldn't like those artists? I quite liked David Leffel's stuff (although it was just a cursory glance at a google image search). I said I liked science fiction, but that doesn't mean I don't like other stuff too.
    The reason I recommend figuring out what artists and type of work inspires you is because that tells you what to work on, what to work with and then you can follow their lead. Chances are the artists you like either have books, magazine articles, websites, blogs, interviews, etc. where they talk about their methods. If you find out the people you like are mostly oil painters it doesn't do much good to use gouache.

    Just my assumption, most young people aren't terribly interested in really traditional stuff is all. Glad you liked Leffel though.

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  16. #11
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    Plexiglass makes a good palette. Clear, so you can perhaps stick a color wheel underneath it, it's shatterproof, and one that's 12 x 24" can go for just 10$. When you're done with it stick it in your fridge or freezer if you got the space. Otherwise, spray it down then wrap it up with saran wrap, that clear plastic sheet thing you use to preserve food. And start off simple with your colors, buy them as you need them.

    My sketchbook:

    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=191977

    My page on Facebook, which I update much more often.

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  17. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qitsune View Post
    You mean your teachers want you to use paint but they don't want to teach you how to use them? Why are they called TEACHers exactly?
    Welcome to art school in Britain.

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  19. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dcorc View Post
    Welcome to art school in Britain.
    Yeah...but it's art school here in the colonies too.

    You have to be lucky to find a good teacher here as well, or do your homework and really research schools and programs. But TBH, that appplies to pretty much anything anyway.

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