A more narrative oil piece. Crits welcome!

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 102 Times in 99 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    A more narrative oil piece. Crits welcome!

    This is my latest painting called "New Home Old Home". Oil on canvas. Conceptually, it's exploring the ironic way people admire nature while striving to control it. I'm trying to communicate this through a more narrative vibe. I developed the painting using a grisaille technique, but some of the value contrast got washed out as the colors were glazed on. I'm not sure whether I managed to fix that or not. Excuses aside, please let me know what yall think!
    Name:  FINAL New Home Old Home100dpi.jpg
Views: 271
Size:  185.1 KB

    Please Sir, I'd like some more.

    www.rogersewardart.com

    Facebook

    Twitter
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,903 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Nice concept...I think to pull this off and help your message hit home you need to do one of two things: nail this as far as technique and drawing go, or go the other way and twist it a bit further toward surrealism. Seems caught between right now if you know what I mean? The character, bunnies, mower right now just aren't developed well enough for it to feel like much more than a painted cartoon. Either way I think it is important that your paint handling technique fits the subject or statement a litle closer. Just my initial reaction, two cents.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 102 Times in 99 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for the crit! I agree, it is sort of trapped between two aesthetics right now. That's partly style and partly technical challenges. I was using reference but also improvising pretty heavily. Thanks for the comment.

    Please Sir, I'd like some more.

    www.rogersewardart.com

    Facebook

    Twitter
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #4
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,180
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 2,356 Times in 1,211 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, the landscape looks nice but the guy and the bunnies are kinda creepy in comparison. He doesn't look like he's really looking at the rabbits. And I find that the way most people cartoonify rabbits to be pretty unappealing -- like teddy bears with long ears.

    Anyway, the overall effect is like Wallace and Grommit stuck into a post-impressionist painting and I'm not sure that's quite working for you.

    I really like that landscape though.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. The Following User Says Thank You to vineris For This Useful Post:


  8. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Prunedale, CA
    Posts
    41
    Thanks
    12
    Thanked 29 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think the figure's expression is vague as well. I am not really clear as to whether he is an amazement, angry at the sky or yodeling. I really like the narrative you are trying to express and once the aesthetic is nailed down, it will be a lot easier for a viewer to take your message from the painting.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Forgemaster For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 102 Times in 99 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Solid point. The style of those elements doesn't necessarily match the mood and message I was going for. Thanks for the crit!

    Please Sir, I'd like some more.

    www.rogersewardart.com

    Facebook

    Twitter
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Sydney, Australia
    Posts
    515
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 17 Times in 15 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I think it could benefit from some colour variety. Right now it looks like everything is within the yellow bit of the colour wheel, with yellow-greens and oranges. Everything seems to either be a yellow, a green-yellow or a red-yellow or brown.

    Placing some colour from the opposite side of the colour wheel might help to freshen up the piece and pull focus to key areas.

    Sydney artist Luke Marcatili

    "Fear is the mindkiller..."
    - The Litany Against Fear
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to Marcatili For This Useful Post:


  13. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Valencia, CA
    Posts
    354
    Thanks
    225
    Thanked 225 Times in 118 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Giving it the 'squint' test, the viewer focus is drawn to the two dark trees against the light sky. If it were me I'd really tweak the values to draw us towards the figure (seems like the highlights on his face should maybe be lighter than the highlights on the rubber tires, for instance.) You even have him in a white shirt...seems like a good chance for some light.

    The piece does have a dreamy, unreal quality which I like. I don't even mind that he's not looking at the bunny while he's waving to it...that kind of touch appeals to my unsettled mind if its intentional.

    Also, that 'main' bunny's shadow is too long.

    My portfolio

    Would you like to see my drawr-rings?

    Will design for food, provided that we all agree that money is edible.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. The Following User Says Thank You to DPFX For This Useful Post:


  15. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    289
    Thanks
    41
    Thanked 102 Times in 99 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Marcatili: Thanks for the comment! I was intending to focus on that green/red pop between the lawnmower and the surroundings. You're totally right though, it could definitely benefit from a bit of color variety. Thanks.

    DPFX: Thanks for checking it out! I'm glad you picked up on that ironic bewilderment and general confusion in the figure's gaze! I think you're right, the values could use a bit of tweaking. I was focusing on color as the primary director in this one.

    Please Sir, I'd like some more.

    www.rogersewardart.com

    Facebook

    Twitter
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook