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    Lightbulb Dog and puppy

    Hey guys. I want your opinion on this piece please. In regards to canine (is that the right word?) anatomy, perspective. I'm planning to draw a flower field for a background but I'm open to suggestions, on bg, composition and other things. I'll probably make either the canvas bigger or the figures smaller depending on what I finally decide the bg will be. At the moment I want critiques or anatomy, perspective and suggestions on what I've already mentioned.

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    Well. Hm. The timid scribbly lines are deceptive; it's a better rough than it looks at first glance. Looks like you've got the main shapes together in the right proportion. I'm not positive the puppy is on the same plane as the dog.

    I'm afraid you're going to have to do the difficult thing -- the weight-bearing back legs on both dogs -- before I can really tell.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stoat View Post
    Well. Hm. The timid scribbly lines are deceptive; it's a better rough than it looks at first glance. Looks like you've got the main shapes together in the right proportion. I'm not positive the puppy is on the same plane as the dog.

    I'm afraid you're going to have to do the difficult thing -- the weight-bearing back legs on both dogs -- before I can really tell.

    Yeah my initial sketches are usually drawn like this, with many lines because I draw over mistakes until I get the shape I like. I'm afraid I'll have to agree with you on regards to the puppy. I fear his whole body is pointing to one direction and the dog's to another. I might just totally redraw him.

    I'm not sure I understand what you mean by that last part, the weight bearing bit. Can you go more into that?

    "Why explore the distant planets when my own mind is a mystery and an adventure in itself." S. Rios

    "There is no bigger world or greater reality than your own imagination." S. Rios
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    I'd advise to sketch with pencil on paper. You're making your task unnecessarily challenging with the tablet / mouse / whatever it is you are using.

    Work the perspective out. Merely constructing a couple of boxes in the position/alignment of the dogs would give you a much better basis for a solid drawing. Don't make guesses; build it.

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    Oh, I just meant that you haven't finished the back legs on either pup. And that those are particularly vital (and difficult) because they bear the dogs' weight and show their position relative to the plane (and therefore each other).

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    I'd advise to sketch with pencil on paper. You're making your task unnecessarily challenging with the tablet / mouse / whatever it is you are using.

    Work the perspective out. Merely constructing a couple of boxes in the position/alignment of the dogs would give you a much better basis for a solid drawing. Don't make guesses; build it.
    I draw digitally because it actually frustrates me erasing so much on paper. Before this I did a few thumbnails just practicing anatomy and poses on paper. I'm aware I have a problem with the perspective/alignment and that's why I'm asking for help. I can't see how to fix it other than just redrawing it whole, so I'd like to see somebody say , well this or that part looks bad because this or that, maybe draw over it and explain why? Idk. I'll be updating soon anyway with more variations or modifications to it.

    "Why explore the distant planets when my own mind is a mystery and an adventure in itself." S. Rios

    "There is no bigger world or greater reality than your own imagination." S. Rios
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    Another sketch. I like this one better. The dog looks fat but that's because I drew the silhouette of the hair over the skeleton before erasing the foundations. Maybe I should've left it in. Thoughts please!!!!!

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    Personally, I thought the other angle, although more difficult, was more interesting. Here is a link to some dog skeleton and musculature That may help: Dog Anatomy Also, are you using reference for this? Does it have both the puppy and dog in it or are you using two different images? Draw a horizon line and few perspective lines to help get both on the same plane.

    Minimal art went nowhere. - Sol LeWitt

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    Quote Originally Posted by LAG View Post
    Personally, I thought the other angle, although more difficult, was more interesting. Here is a link to some dog skeleton and musculature That may help: Dog Anatomy Also, are you using reference for this? Does it have both the puppy and dog in it or are you using two different images? Draw a horizon line and few perspective lines to help get both on the same plane.
    I am using references but they're different for each subject. Haven't been able to find any good ones with two dogs. I have those anatomy illustrations, they're very useful, thanks for linking them anyway. I happen to like this sketch better but I'm still looking for more dynamic poses, because so far, they don't call out to me and make me go "gasp! so cute!" Thanks for commenting by the way. Very very helpful.

    "Why explore the distant planets when my own mind is a mystery and an adventure in itself." S. Rios

    "There is no bigger world or greater reality than your own imagination." S. Rios
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    Managed to find a couple of ref. pics that seem suitable. Will update soon.

    "Why explore the distant planets when my own mind is a mystery and an adventure in itself." S. Rios

    "There is no bigger world or greater reality than your own imagination." S. Rios
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    Here we go again

    Ok so here I go again! Another sketch, this time both subjects belong to the same picture, to avoid perspective problems mentioned earlier since I still don't know much about how to do that from scratch. It has a horizon line...hope its okay. And you can see the reference picture and how I did the shapes. I think the pup's head is too small for his body or his body too big for his head argh!. I know I said I would make more dynamic poses but I like this one best for what I'm trying to portray.Critique please
    Thanks to greensh on deviantart for the reference photo.

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    You need to learn to observe better. The problem is not so much in your drawing, but more in the way you're seeing your reference.

    A few examples: In the photograph, the puppy's back curves and ends against it's ear. In your drawing it's far above there. The puppy's and mother's ear are also much closer together. The puppy's left front leg is more horizontal, less thick and less broken than in your drawing, and also positioned further to the left. Also, why is the the lower part of it's right leg fatter than where it meets the body (in your drawing)? It's clearly a tube-like shape in the reference. You've drawn the mother's back as an arch, while it's almost straight and even slightly going upwards again towards the tail. And so on.

    If it's not your intention to copy the reference exactly, it would probably be best if you try to construct the animals from the inside out; start with a skeleton with the correct proportions and build up the animal around it. In that case you should only use references as a guideline for the forms and proportions.

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  17. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lhune View Post
    You need to learn to observe better. The problem is not so much in your drawing, but more in the way you're seeing your reference.

    A few examples: In the photograph, the puppy's back curves and ends against it's ear. In your drawing it's far above there. The puppy's and mother's ear are also much closer together. The puppy's left front leg is more horizontal, less thick and less broken than in your drawing, and also positioned further to the left. Also, why is the the lower part of it's right leg fatter than where it meets the body (in your drawing)? It's clearly a tube-like shape in the reference. You've drawn the mother's back as an arch, while it's almost straight and even slightly going upwards again towards the tail. And so on.

    If it's not your intention to copy the reference exactly, it would probably be best if you try to construct the animals from the inside out; start with a skeleton with the correct proportions and build up the animal around it. In that case you should only use references as a guideline for the forms and proportions.
    Thanks for commenting! I spent like an hour drawing the dog and 5 mins on the puppy. I wanted to just have him included to get a feel of the space he will occupy. It is by no means finished. I agree, the back does seems arched when its supposed to be more straight. I am mostly using the reference for the pose. Got a little carried away drawing the ears and fluffy tail. So far this is the sketch I've liked the most so I'll keep investing time in this one.

    "Why explore the distant planets when my own mind is a mystery and an adventure in itself." S. Rios

    "There is no bigger world or greater reality than your own imagination." S. Rios
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