What is your opinion on hyperrealism?

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  1. #1
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    What is your opinion on hyperrealism?

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  3. #2
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    So realistic that it looks like he doesn't compensate for the perspective distortion that his camera creates?

    Third image.



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    Quote Originally Posted by Beeston View Post
    So realistic that it looks like he doesn't compensate for the perspective distortion that his camera creates?

    Third image.
    ROFL

    Well noticed. That about sums most of "hyperrealism" up.

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  6. #4
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    bleugh. the only interest in these would be in the photo as well, and they're not very interesting photos.

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  7. #5
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    I've never understood the point of it to be honest. It's not nice to look at, and it's not artistic in the least. Slavishly copying every detail, adding no personal touch at all. Bleh. Just my opinion!

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    I once trod in some.

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  10. #7
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    They leave the same impression the photos would leave on me. Not much of one.

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    I find hyper-realism more interesting when not done after photos, but after life - like this cut-up melon.



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  13. #9
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    I have no opinion against it.

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  14. #10
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    http://jeremygeddesart.blogspot.com/ is it hyper-real ? dont know, but if the artist want to do a great piece using his abstraction power to do something more than a just copy.. wow its great, its about control and how you understand the world, your eyes and etc..

    3__3 I dont know if my monkey english make clear what I think... D:

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  16. #11
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    Very skillfull and impressive to say the least, but I can't see why anybody would want limit themselves to realism

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  19. #13
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    I had a professor at a community college who was a photo realistic painter. The detail was astounding. Various sizes, but he did seem to have the same bland taste in the subject matter. Like one was a gas pump.

    Although he did shift around the hue in some of them while keeping it realistic.


    Eh you don't get the feel as well through the internet. Seeing a giant canvas over 6 ft tall where it's still hard to distinguish it being done with brush strokes I found astounding.

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  20. #14
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    I tend to see this kind of art as a way for painters to talk back at the camera.

    But beyond that, I think it takes the subject matter of the photograph into another realm. Camera pictures being everywhere; magazines, television, ads, the internet... we don't pay much attention to 95% of them. But like JFierce said, walking by a gallery and seeing a giant photorealistic image painted on canvas really ought to catch your eye. So when a guy like Denis Peterson reproduces a horse race photograph with paints what he does is allow that image to be given fresher attention through a medium which is less crowded with similar imagery.

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  22. #15
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    Sure its technically impressive, but its not discernible from a photo. Part of the beauty and soul of art is that the viewer needs to know or hinted at that they're looking at a painting/drawing. A few things give it away like brushstrokes, which come to mind firstly, since these paintings obviously lack. That tension between the mind interpreting the subject as a real object and having enough artistic freedom thereby reminding you its a drawing is a pleasing and expressive effect. There arent any here, so the artistic merit lies elsewhere.
    Even as subjects themselves, these are pretty dull compositions. And thats where a creative artist not bound by rigid technique would compensate for.
    But if technical stuff 'moves' you then more power to you.

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  23. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LORD M View Post
    I find hyper-realism more interesting when not done after photos, but after life - like this cut-up melon.

    I always wonder how they do this, considering that the painting surely takes hours or days to complete, and the subject matter will not stay fresh.

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  25. #17
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    blogmatix...you'd cut up another melon...

    The first reply by Beeston about lens distortion was right on the money. Further, the fact that light values are blown out to white - the horse race is a great example...cloudy heavy downpour kind of day but the photo was exposed for the dark flanks of the horses...I mean, that's a muddy racetrack...and it's white?

    Same issue with the painting SoufMeng posted...exposed for the sky...all those shadows yet no ambient sky light illuminating them? Your eyes would see it...but not the camera.

    I'm completely in agreement with Lord M...high level realism, from life, is really inspirational...from photos? Offensive.

    Last edited by JeffX99; December 12th, 2011 at 03:10 PM. Reason: typos
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  26. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    blogmatix...you'd cut up another melon...

    The first reply by Beeston about lens diastortion was right on the money. Further, th efact that light values are blown out to white - the horse race is a great example...cloudy heavy downpour kind of day but the photo was exposed for the dark flanks of the horses...I mean, that's a muddy racetrack...and it's white?

    Same issue with the painting SoufMeng posted...exposed for the sky...all those shadows yet no ambint sky light illuminating them? Your eyes would see it...but not the camera.

    I'm completely in agreement with Lord M...high level realism, from life, is really inspirational...from photos? Offensive.
    Idk I could see that happening with the racetrack, it "could" be a "fresh" track so it wouldn't be messed up and really muddy. But what the hell do I know.

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  27. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    The first reply by Beeston about lens diastortion was right on the money. Further, th efact that light values are blown out to white - the horse race is a great example...cloudy heavy downpour kind of day but the photo was exposed for the dark flanks of the horses...I mean, that's a muddy racetrack...and it's white?

    Same issue with the painting SoufMeng posted...exposed for the sky...all those shadows yet no ambint sky light illuminating them? Your eyes would see it...but not the camera.
    That's actually the point, although it's often lost on the average viewer (and, to be fair, many of the below-average practitioners). Same with the mundane subject matter. Photorealism, despite surface similarities, is an outgrowth of Pop, not the mainstream representational tradition. It's also an artform that loses almost all of its impact in reproduction.
    It's a movement that has to be appreciated in the context of its time. I find most contemporary Photorealism as interesting or relevant as most contemporary impressionism.

    Last edited by Elwell; December 12th, 2011 at 07:52 AM.

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  29. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    I find most contemporary Photorealism as interesting or relevant as most contemporary impressionism.
    .....?

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  30. #21
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    In other words, boring decorative painting that appropriates the surface qualities of a historical movement without knowing or caring about the historical context. Pastiche is only interesting to the extent that it's unsuccessful. What was good about neoclassicism was the neo.


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  31. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    blogmatix...you'd cut up another melon...

    The first reply by Beeston about lens diastortion was right on the money. Further, th efact that light values are blown out to white - the horse race is a great example...cloudy heavy downpour kind of day but the photo was exposed for the dark flanks of the horses...I mean, that's a muddy racetrack...and it's white?

    Same issue with the painting SoufMeng posted...exposed for the sky...all those shadows yet no ambint sky light illuminating them?Your eyes would see it...but not the camera.

    I'm completely in agreement with Lord M...high level realism, from life, is really inspirational...from photos? Offensive.
    Your eyes would see it but not the camera: The horse race painting is also about all that the camera can see but that your eyes couldn't. As soon as a photograph freezes a moment of reality, that lasted but a second for you to look at for hours, representing that photograph with paints is as close a you get to drawing from life such a transient moment. Mind you I *love* me some Stampede by Frederic Remington but different games>different rules>different wins...

    Last edited by SM; December 12th, 2011 at 08:49 AM.
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  32. #23
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    To expand on Noah's post, while Hyperrealism was originally coined as a synonym for Photorealism, and while most (but not all) hyper-realists use photographs in their process, not all hyperrealism is photorealism.


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  34. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    In other words, boring decorative painting that appropriates the surface qualities of a historical movement without knowing or caring about the historical context. Pastiche is only interesting to the extent that it's unsuccessful. What was good about neoclassicism was the neo.
    But photorealism is entirely about surfaces. As is all of Pop Art.
    Therefore, contemporary photorealism is completely consistent with the original philosophy, whether it is understood by the practitioner or not.

    Surfaces that copy surfaces.
    It is Pastiche of Pastiche.

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  35. #25
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    I knew if I waited Elwell of someone would get to the bottom of this. Photorealism as an extension of Pop was all about the photo. I had a teacher who was actually a part of the Photorealist thing. The paintings looked photographic from about 15 feet and beyond but when close they looked like swirls, dashes and dots of airbrush. Dead surface but it was never about that.

    People who do the photorealist thing now are just showing off for the most part. Although there are few who provide a twist and intrigue me.

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  37. #26
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    The conceptualist point or conceit of hyperrealist work only had to be made once in terms of aesthetic philosophy. It's a sociological one-liner, more or less. Restating this same point over and over again in new works is of no value (or of decreasing value the more it is stated). So the value of hyperrealist work started being more about the rendering/showing off than the conceptual point almost from the beginning. The cultural point it made concrete was of real market value only during its initial dissemination period. From then on it was just the cleverest way to market more banal realism.

    At least Icarus tried!


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  39. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    To expand on Noah's post, while Hyperrealism was originally coined as a synonym for Photorealism, and while most (but not all) hyper-realists use photographs in their process, not all hyperrealism is photorealism.
    I have never been too clear on what exactly the difference between the two is.

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  40. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    That's actually the point,...
    Oh, I totallyunderstand the point, and that's a good observation that really it grew out of Pop...I just don't think much of the point.

    Edit: Lack of facility/technique + lack of statement + lack of truth = lack of art. To me.

    Last edited by JeffX99; December 12th, 2011 at 03:27 PM.
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  42. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by dennis.k View Post
    I find imaginative realism more interesting.
    I agree, while hyperrealism is impressive, I enjoy works like this more:

    Joshua LaRock

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    Last edited by FlameDragon; December 13th, 2011 at 11:23 AM.
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  44. #30
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    What genre would this guys work fall in?
    http://www.mihanovic.com/home.html

    'back home, he gets talked about as hyper-realist?
    I gather he doesn't work with photos though, just pushes the realism of what he puts together.

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