Art: Q's University Portfolio (Traditional & Digital)
 
View testimonialsView Artwork
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nowhere specific yet
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Q's University Portfolio (Traditional & Digital)

    EDIT: Apologies about the large files. Wasn't sure what the site would do about picture sizes. Now I know.
    O------------------------------O

    Good day, everyone.

    My name is Q and I am a student studying Drawing (and possibly Animation) at Arizona State University in order to graduate with a Drawing Major.

    So far I have only taken one Life Drawing class (Summer 2011) and plan to take the next class in the Spring

    I must also add that I am a digital artist and am trying to break away from the anime style. Unfortunately, the university no longer offers Digital Art courses so I am practically self-taught. That being said, I want to add some of my digital works to the portfolio (showcasing change/improvement over time). An although the judging panel consists of Traditional artists, my advisor suggested a 50-50 of Traditional and Digital.

    Is this wise or should I mainly stick to Traditional images?

    All Traditional Images were done in Summer 2011
    Digital Images complete over the past 2-3 years

    Attached Images Attached Images                    
    Last edited by AzureChromatic; January 4th, 2012 at 04:31 AM. Reason: Smaller Files
    I'm boring... IGNORE ME!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Pennsylvaniarrr, USA
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    378
    Thanked 27 Times in 23 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I'm not an art student, but I'd recommend getting an anatomy book like Loomis' Figure Drawing for What It's Worth (you can find this one for free online). It seems like you're trying to simplify the forms into straight, sort of box-like lines and that's neglecting the muscle structure underneath (especially with your traditional sketches). I think that your digital work looks stronger than your traditional work in the attachments. I've met some portfolio-reviewers who totally dismissed digital art as a valid medium, but they didn't know who M.C. Escher was, so I didn't really bother with them. For your traditional pieces you should try to follow the forms more with your pencil strokes instead of just having one-directional pencil lines. Also, I think you should do some more finished traditional drawings (either get a full-length mirror and draw yourself or have a friend sit for some photos). I think you might get more comments if you shrink your images. They take a long time to load, you can't see an image all at once and they're rather annoying.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to msafs For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    198
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 26 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    like msaf said find some loomis or other reference materials both of which you can find for free in abundance or ask your friends & family to pose for you, if your looking for a portfolio do as much observational work and and do it traditionaly to be safe it is unlikely that a school reviewer will accept digital it is easy to fake among other reasons.
    and not to be mean but work from observation and put the animation stuff on the side for a bit im a fan of manga and animation in general but look at your favorite artist and i promise you that they have all studied traditional form and anatomy from life and observational studies do this and you will get better at any style you choose to work in because when it comes down to it its the basics that are going to make or brake your work. hope that was helpful and the best of luck to you.

    remember study tone, form, anatomy, perspective and lighting and it will greatly improve your work.
    good resources: Loomis books, charles barque plates(which can be found for free online even somewhere on ca)
    posemaniacs.com
    characterdesigns.com
    you can also check the crimson daggers which is a online study group thats ran by a few people who work in the industry and can offer better advice and direction than myself.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to madsamuri2240 For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    175
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 85 Times in 66 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If you are serious about being a digital illustrator (not an anime artist) I would focus on realism for a while. Start from the ground up in traditional medium. Learn perspective and construction drawing, then learn value by drawing spheres, cones, and blocks, then move to objects, and then faces, and then figures. Then learn to paint still life, then landscapes, then faces, then figures, then illustrative scenes. Then move to digital medium. It's a long road but if you are really serious about it, taking shortcuts could hinder you.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Lithriel For This Useful Post:


  9. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I agree with the posts above, you need to work on your anatomy.
    I also feel you should dabble in traditional more, your coloring seems a bit flat and so do your lines. But don't worry, its nothing that a bottle of ink and some watercolors can't help. (Make sure the ink is waterproof before using them together though, I'm never making that mistake again)
    Also, as you are a manga artist, I recommend you try copic markers on for size. Expensive little devils but worth every penny.
    Good luck!

    Panicking is optional.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nowhere specific yet
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by msafs View Post
    I'm not an art student, but I'd recommend getting an anatomy book like Loomis' Figure Drawing for What It's Worth (you can find this one for free online). It seems like you're trying to simplify the forms into straight, sort of box-like lines and that's neglecting the muscle structure underneath (especially with your traditional sketches). I think that your digital work looks stronger than your traditional work in the attachments. I've met some portfolio-reviewers who totally dismissed digital art as a valid medium, but they didn't know who M.C. Escher was, so I didn't really bother with them. For your traditional pieces you should try to follow the forms more with your pencil strokes instead of just having one-directional pencil lines. Also, I think you should do some more finished traditional drawings (either get a full-length mirror and draw yourself or have a friend sit for some photos). I think you might get more comments if you shrink your images. They take a long time to load, you can't see an image all at once and they're rather annoying.
    At this very moment, I'm getting that book. Thanks for that.
    As for the box-lines, I've recently gotten that criticism from more than one source. I'll definitely try to work on that. And thanks for the tip on the image sizes. I wasn't aware of what the site would do with images. Now I know.

    I'm boring... IGNORE ME!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nowhere specific yet
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by madsamuri2240 View Post
    like msaf said find some loomis or other reference materials both of which you can find for free in abundance or ask your friends & family to pose for you, if your looking for a portfolio do as much observational work and and do it traditionaly to be safe it is unlikely that a school reviewer will accept digital it is easy to fake among other reasons.
    and not to be mean but work from observation and put the animation stuff on the side for a bit im a fan of manga and animation in general but look at your favorite artist and i promise you that they have all studied traditional form and anatomy from life and observational studies do this and you will get better at any style you choose to work in because when it comes down to it its the basics that are going to make or brake your work. hope that was helpful and the best of luck to you.

    remember study tone, form, anatomy, perspective and lighting and it will greatly improve your work.
    good resources: Loomis books, charles barque plates(which can be found for free online even somewhere on ca)
    posemaniacs.com
    characterdesigns.com
    you can also check the crimson daggers which is a online study group thats ran by a few people who work in the industry and can offer better advice and direction than myself.
    I've been frequenting posemaniacs so it's good to know I'm in the right place.
    Thank you very much. i'll check those places out as soon as possible.

    I'm boring... IGNORE ME!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Nowhere specific yet
    Posts
    4
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Lithriel View Post
    If you are serious about being a digital illustrator (not an anime artist) I would focus on realism for a while. Start from the ground up in traditional medium. Learn perspective and construction drawing, then learn value by drawing spheres, cones, and blocks, then move to objects, and then faces, and then figures. Then learn to paint still life, then landscapes, then faces, then figures, then illustrative scenes. Then move to digital medium. It's a long road but if you are really serious about it, taking shortcuts could hinder you.
    Fair enough. I appreciate the criticism. Plus it wouldn't hurt to get away form the computer every once in a while. Thanks!

    I'm boring... IGNORE ME!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook