Would you visit a museum of reproductions of painting masterpeices? - Page 2
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 31 to 40 of 40

Thread: Would you visit a museum of reproductions of painting masterpeices?

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Russia | USA | Italia
    Posts
    523
    Thanks
    101
    Thanked 424 Times in 289 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Uhm...post #8?
    Uhm... Not exactly.
    I'm not talking about "the effects and dynamic qualities" only, though I meant this as well.

    What I'm referring to is the positive energy that certain paintings can carry to the viewer for several generations ahead. While there is some negative energy that other paintings might carry as well. And I don't mean precisely positive or negative subject of the image itself.

    E.g., no matter of real sadness of many works by Rembrandt I always get almost physical healing by those we have in the Hermitage (and other places, of course!).
    And da Vinci... I could listen to millions of praises but until I finally got to Louvre and was able to approach several of them personally... I didn't realize what kind of different universe existed nearby.

    Though I still take everything said about Mona Lisa for granted as I never was able to enjoy this piece close enough and without glass covering it (though I'm still hopeful!).

    www.4-art.org - art educational books
    www.Practicum.org - art educational portal
    guru@4-art.org - my direct e-mail
    Russian Academy of Arts thread - all about it

    There was a sign on the Academy building, “Free Arts”. “What’s that?”, we asked our professor. – “That’s to be able to create anything, but to create what you want to.”
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. The Following User Says Thank You to Book Guru For This Useful Post:


  3. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I knew Manet's 'Olympia' and 'Dejeuner sur L'Herbe' through reproductions. But when I saw them together in Paris I just sat there enraptured for the best part of an hour. I can remember the experience of the Olympia's hand; described by that little area of creamy paint compressed by the pale slab of pigment for her thigh, and all sat within a wonderful black flag of glazed canvas with those little flicks of paint around her head like leaves taken by the wind...
    Intoxicating - I can feel it even now.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  5. #33
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    If this museum asks for payment, can we use reproductions of money?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  7. #34
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newburgh, NY
    Posts
    118
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked 49 Times in 31 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Julie G View Post
    I'm not convinced there is an energy or aura. If you want to talk about the unique application of paint, the tiny, unapparent details, the subtleties, and the difference in materials be my guest, but there's no residual energy or aura there.
    I dunno if you want to call it energy or aura or whatever, but there really is a kind of magic to being in the presence of the actual physical artwork touched by the hand of the master. To get right up close to a Rembrandt where you can see the globs and strokes of paint made by his hand pushing the brush right there. Its more than just the technical learning experience of examining the details and paint application. There's a kind of connection that happens that you just dont get from a reproduction. It may sound corny and hero-worshippy, but I find it very powerful.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to papageo For This Useful Post:


  9. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Newburgh, NY
    Posts
    118
    Thanks
    57
    Thanked 49 Times in 31 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Also, I want to add that I find this whole idea very Vegas Beatlemania-ish. There's so much more to art than just the big rockstar paintings.

    There are so many smaller museums all over the country that often have surprisingly good, if small collections, that unless you live in the Yukon, it should be possible to have access to true Master paintings. Many of the world's major paintings are tucked away in these small collections.

    Plus, for learning purposes, I believe there might be more value in really diving into a select few masterpieces than shuffling past thousands and thousands of paintings in a monster collection.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #36
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Book Guru View Post

    What I'm referring to is the positive energy that certain paintings can carry to the viewer for several generations ahead. While there is some negative energy that other paintings might carry as well. And I don't mean precisely positive or negative subject of the image itself.
    That was what I meant by "visceral thrill of being in the presence of the painting"...no biggie, just clarifying. To this day I still recall those emotions that Chris so well expressed when I saw the Sargent landscape exhibit a few years ago. It is a very moving experience to stand in the same spot as the Master stood and consider the work, the emotion, the techniques and the decisions that went into the painting. It offers one a tremendous sense of connection that travels all the way back to people painting bison on walls.

    An aside...most Native Americans were (and are) "animists" that believe all things posess energy or power, to greater or lesser degrees. Hard to fault that belief with this kind of thing.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #37
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    212
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 75 Times in 54 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    removed

    Last edited by mutestar; March 11th, 2013 at 01:58 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Body is in Washington, Heart is in Texas, Brain is in Middle Earth
    Posts
    306
    Thanks
    2
    Thanked 38 Times in 29 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah why not.
    Though I wouldn't expect go get charged for it.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #39
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,826
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 1,042 Times in 680 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I got to stare at a Mucha at the Met one time. REAAAALLLLLL close to see the strokes.


    ENVY ME!

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by papageo View Post
    Its more than just the technical learning experience of examining the details and paint application. There's a kind of connection that happens that you just dont get from a reproduction. It may sound corny and hero-worshippy, but I find it very powerful.
    I agree completely, and I don't think it's even necessarily a "hero worship" thing.
    I've been blown away by paintings that I wouldn't have paused at if I saw them while flicking through a book, often by guys I'd never even heard of..

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Members who have read this thread: 2

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •