Temple Ruins

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Temple Ruins

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Temple Ruins

    Hi guys! This is my first post here so nice to meet you all I've decided to join conceptart hoping to improve my art and meet some fellow artists.

    Temple Ruins
    Here is a environmental painting I did last week. I usually draw characters and abstract backgrounds more, so this is kind of going out of my comfort zone.

    Can I please get some constructive critiques on how I should improve this? Such as the mood, perspective, lighting etc or anything you think will help to put more oomph in this painting.

    Thank you!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    545
    Thanks
    92
    Thanked 90 Times in 90 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    the lighting and the mood are fine, perhaps darken up some things in the foreground to really give some depth (the rocks at the front of the image)
    and your tree sorta ruins it, the fact it goes from thin to thick and the detail goes from amazing (the roots) to poor (the upper fat part i was just mentioning)
    theres no such thing as a perfect picture, but keep yeah, those are my recommendations
    Good work nontheless.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by A Faux View Post
    the lighting and the mood are fine, perhaps darken up some things in the foreground to really give some depth (the rocks at the front of the image)
    and your tree sorta ruins it, the fact it goes from thin to thick and the detail goes from amazing (the roots) to poor (the upper fat part i was just mentioning)
    theres no such thing as a perfect picture, but keep yeah, those are my recommendations
    Good work nontheless.
    Thank you for your input Yes I totally agree with the trees, I always have problems with drawing trees so will definitely practice on improving them.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    85
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 21 Times in 21 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I really like it, really lovely shapes and lighting. Maybe a tiny, tiny bit of refinement on the right hand side on the tree shapes just because that's where the eye leads across.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 9 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Your forms are very soft. I suggest making a layer above your piece and going in there
    with a hard pencil or brush and really spend some time working on your drawing issues. Your stones have too much unity and need to be distressed in thoughtful ways. Your values are a bit washed out in the foreground and suffer from some dark's to anchor your image. Your color is a bit too monochromatic and would be better served if you were too accent the vegetation with some complimentary colors in the temple. Your light source is far too blown out and is killing the atmospheric perspective that you are trying to create. I'm not crazy about your center of interest being smack dabb in the middle of your composition it lends itself to a static viewing experience. There are ways to remedy the problem while retaining your original composition. Your paintings features are all saying" look at me no no no look at me". The human eye can only focus on one thing at a time and needs moments of calm so it can rest in your picture.
    If you were to divide your picture in thirds horizontally and vertically at those intersecting points are compositional strong points . If you were to chose one of those strong points and make it your center of interest your image would increase in dynamism. In order to do that your background light will need to be subordinated ...it should be anyhow.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by playinsincepong View Post
    Your forms are very soft. I suggest making a layer above your piece and going in there
    with a hard pencil or brush and really spend some time working on your drawing issues. Your stones have too much unity and need to be distressed in thoughtful ways. Your values are a bit washed out in the foreground and suffer from some dark's to anchor your image. Your color is a bit too monochromatic and would be better served if you were too accent the vegetation with some complimentary colors in the temple. Your light source is far too blown out and is killing the atmospheric perspective that you are trying to create. I'm not crazy about your center of interest being smack dabb in the middle of your composition it lends itself to a static viewing experience. There are ways to remedy the problem while retaining your original composition. Your paintings features are all saying" look at me no no no look at me". The human eye can only focus on one thing at a time and needs moments of calm so it can rest in your picture.
    If you were to divide your picture in thirds horizontally and vertically at those intersecting points are compositional strong points . If you were to chose one of those strong points and make it your center of interest your image would increase in dynamism. In order to do that your background light will need to be subordinated ...it should be anyhow.
    Thank you for your insight and critiques. Whilst I sort of understand what you are saying in terms of composition, would you mind sketching over my picture and explain it to me in a more visual way?

    I'll definitely try to add more colours to the painting.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    48
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 9 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I will later today, but I don't want to give you the impression that your work isn't good, it is good but it can be great. But that's the point our work can always get better. I highly suggest you get the gnomon dvd's of dylan cole...actually pleeasse get them even if you don't want to be a matte painter especially the first one. Also buy the James Gurney book I just bought "Color and Light a realist painters guide) it's $16 on Amazon and worth 10X
    that price. It may be the most important educational purchase I've made.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Follows
    1
    Following
    0
    This has the look of a good beginning. To firm it up, more opaque colors. Especially where you want the eye to dwell.

    It's unusual for light to stream in straight down. I mean, it does that at noon, but we're more accustomed to seeing it angle in. Which doesn't mean you should change it, it just stood out for me.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook