Wobbly building
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  1. #1
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    Cow Wobbly building

    Hi everyone, I've finally got a little bit of time for art so am working on a painting.

    I was wondering if anyone would be so kind as to give me some critique on this picture? I'm particularly struggling with the building, especially the windows. I'm finding it really hard to paint them without all the frames looking wobbly. Is there a technique to this, or will this come with practice?

    I've been trying to learn perspective, but I'm not sure I've quite got it looking right here. I think the perspective of the girl compared to the building looks a bit off, but I can't see how.

    I'm painting this in Photoshop.

    Thanks a lot



    References:
    http://www.thewookie.co.uk/skyscrapers/index1.html
    http://yellow-stock.deviantart.com/g...set=48#/dkcvwi

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    The problem is that we're viewing the girl straight on but the building goes up in perspective seemingly toward a top vanishing point. We would in this view probably be viewing the girl slightly from below as well.

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  4. #3
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    As Peezle points out you have two different viewpoints and you are also using a ref that is suffering from the common ailment of perspective distortion.

    This is one of the reaons why it's an excellent idea to observe and learn from real life.



    Here is a decent place to learn stuff.

    http://www.ctrlpaint.com/

    and watching thes guys may help too

    http://www.awesomehorsestudios.com/

    Last edited by Charlie D; November 13th, 2011 at 05:49 PM.
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    Your building appears to be a very tall piece of paper. Show at least one of the sides, or at least have projecting balconies, lintel, etc. to break up those straight sides and give us some depth to look at.

    As for the girl, there appears to be no perspective applied at all. She's straight up and down, there's no particular depth (paper-like) the same as the building. Except where the building is leaning away (to a third vanishing point?), the girl isn't. So it looks like the paper building is just falling over, which is what I'd expect from a piece of paper in fact.

    If I were you, I'd start with something a bit simpler and easier to work out the perspective on. Boxes are always a good starting point, although you will need to add variation to the simple box roughs that you start with. There's an excellent tutorial on perspective right here on CA that you should go through before anything else.

    A few things to remember: Showing the sides of things gives a feeling of depth. So try not to stick one-point objects in front of the vanishing point, and use two-point wherever possible. Save three-point for dramatic up or down shots, and generally use sparingly. A character will obviously be more compicated than a box, but here's the cool part. Your character fits inside a box, which you can use as a guide for perspective. You can see the bottom of anything above the horizon line, meaning that you should be seeing the girl from quite a bit below in this arrangement (HL is below the picture border) and you should be seeing the bottoms of those ledges and window frames on the building. The opposite is also true, but that doesn't apply to this image. You only get one horizon line per image, and that corresponds to the viewer's point of view. So a very low horizon line means the viewer is way down on the floor, or looking sharply upwards. A high horizon line means you're looking at the scene from above.

    Perspective takes a bit of practice to get the knack of it, and it takes a good deal of precision to really get it right. That means rulers if you're using traditional media, and something like the pen tool in Photoshop.

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    Thanks for the helpful advice everyone. I think I understand perspective a lot less than I thought! I'm printing off the tutorial Nezumi recommended now, I'm going to start from scratch and try and get a firm grounding before attempting something like this picture again.

    Charlie D - I never understood why people say it's better to draw from life than photographs but now I can see why it's the case. I know I'll always need to rely on photo refs to some extent. And thanks for the links, I'm going to try and work my way through all the Ctrl Paint tutorials.

    This site is actually a really good resource! As soon as I've got a few hours spare I'm going to start a sketchbook

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    I always block in my drawings at the beginning, like Nezumi described. It really helps to make sure the perspective is correct (and it’s also easier to find and fix any errors while the drawing is loose and simple).

    As for the windows, I personally would use the lasso tool to create a selection around where you want a row or column or windows to be, and fill it with your base color...or create a simple rectangle and then use the transform tools to distort it into the proper perspective Then make more selections and delete to create the spaces between the rows/columns.

    You also have some vertical and horizontal in between the windows. To do these, I would use the brush tool. If you click once at the start of where you want your line to be, hold down shift, and click again at where you want the endpoint, it will make a perfectly straight line from one point to the other. If you want to do a perfectly vertical or horizontal line, you can can simply click and drag the cursor while holding shift and Photoshop will constrain your line to be horizontal or vertical.

    Last edited by Mr. Bean; November 18th, 2011 at 12:55 PM.
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