Differences in figure drawing
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Differences in figure drawing

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    480
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 191 Times in 122 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Differences in figure drawing

    Observe. Copy. Analyze. One gesture line. C curves, not one line. Planes. Define the rib cabe and pelvis. Draw as one form. And it goes on and on.

    I've had about 3 to 4 different figure drawings/anatomy teachers until now, both in college and outside, and every teacher says something different. Right now I am taking a life drawing and an anatomy course for my foundation year of college and sometimes I feel like my head is going to explode. My anatomy teacher tells me to do something and when I try to apply what she said in my life drawing class, my teacher tells me not to do that.

    What should I do? It seems like every teacher feels like they know the "right way" and teach it as so. As a student, I just feel overwhelmed because I know my professors are far more skilled than I am so it is hard to evaluate what I should do and not do.

    Last edited by Saraiva; November 7th, 2011 at 02:36 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    114
    Thanks
    250
    Thanked 41 Times in 25 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, I've been going through the same, one teacher was taught by Vilppu while the other comes from a more fine art background emphasizing the picture making aspect as well as anatomy, gesture, etc. Neither are extreme though which is good and I would suggest doing the same, not taking any method to an extreme. If possible maybe try finding some non-instructed sessions, it'll give you some flexibility, i dunno

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    480
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 191 Times in 122 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah i know what you mean. I have been going to drop in sessions and its been great. This is not a terrible thing, I mean, at least I am getting different views on the same subject. Which is great. Its just that sometimes it can get very confusing and inconsistent. Its hard to improve when every other time you sit down the instructor tells you that what the other instructor said is not the right way to draw.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    90
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 50 Times in 35 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    So, I want to tell you to do whatever works best for you, but I'm not sure that it's really good advice. Figure out what each instructor wants, and give it to them. You're not going to use every method, but spending a semester trying it out will be good for you. Eventually you will find what works for you, and when you do have a class that give you a little more freedom, you can do whichever style you liked best.

    Also, know the instructors at your school. Know what style they're looking for and the way that they teach. Don't like the way one instructor works? Don't take their class if you can avoid it. By the time I was finishing up my degree, I picked all my classes based on instructor, not the topic of the class or how it fit into my schedule. This can actually be easier to do for the foundation classes because they generally have a few teachers teaching the same thing.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to MisterBoo For This Useful Post:


  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    1,139
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 393 Times in 268 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    As I see it, there is only one way to draw and that is the natural way to draw, and most good teachers are trying to teach that, in one way or another. The famous manuals, like Nicolaides, Loomis, Vilppu, Hampton, Mattesi, all aim at this, in different ways, and they all fail, in different ways.

    The whole subject matter, and the people trying to get it, is so complex that no single teacher, and definitely no book, will succeed in getting everybody there. Be pragmatic, and find an approach that works for you.

    In school, you're probably cast in concrete together with your teachers, so try to focus on the things you can learn from them, focus on the things they have in common, instead of their quirks that don't work, and all the differences.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    1,008
    Thanks
    175
    Thanked 696 Times in 292 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here is the deal:

    Strive to be your own best teacher
    Don't rely on anybody else
    Start right now
    Use other teachers for your own research
    Absorb what they have to say, then assimilate what fits into your own system that you are developing
    File away the rest in case you need it later
    Repeat ad nauseum
    Until you are able to teach yourself directly

    You are the only one who could possibly have the "right way to draw"
    But don't let it get to your head
    It only works for you!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to dose For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,972
    Thanks
    1,331
    Thanked 1,923 Times in 757 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alternative View Post
    What should I do? It seems like every teacher feels like they know the "right way" and teach it as so. As a student, I just feel overwhelmed because I know my professors are far more skilled than I am so it is hard to evaluate what I should do and not do.
    You've been given some excellent advise by the guys here.
    I'll only add:
    A good teacher will teach you principles, not rules.
    With the principles understood you can use them in whatever way you wish.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,142
    Thanks
    778
    Thanked 489 Times in 311 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Alternative View Post
    Observe. Copy. Analyze. One gesture line. C curves, not one line. Planes. Define the rib cabe and pelvis. Draw as one form. And it goes on and on.

    I've had about 3 to 4 different figure drawings/anatomy teachers until now, both in college and outside, and every teacher says something different. Right now I am taking a life drawing and an anatomy course for my foundation year of college and sometimes I feel like my head is going to explode. My anatomy teacher tells me to do something and when I try to apply what she said in my life drawing class, my teacher tells me not to do that.

    What should I do? It seems like every teacher feels like they know the "right way" and teach it as so. As a student, I just feel overwhelmed because I know my professors are far more skilled than I am so it is hard to evaluate what I should do and not do.
    In each class, do what that particular professor wants you to.
    As you go on, you'll learn in school and in life, everyone is an expert, and everyone tings their way is the only 'right way'

    Learn as many different ways as you can, and then when you develop your own style and have some liberty to play with, do what feels right to you (unless you're doing it for work, and have to fit someone else's parameters).

    Quote Originally Posted by MisterBoo View Post
    Also, know the instructors at your school. Know what style they're looking for and the way that they teach. Don't like the way one instructor works? Don't take their class if you can avoid it. By the time I was finishing up my degree, I picked all my classes based on instructor, not the topic of the class or how it fit into my schedule. This can actually be easier to do for the foundation classes because they generally have a few teachers teaching the same thing.
    Yes yes, very good advice that I think is worth highlighting.
    In my school (taking foundation), I've been asking around for the toughest and most knowledgeable teachers.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •