is it possible to get back into practice?

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  1. #1
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    is it possible to get back into practice?

    I haven't drawn like I should have for around 2 years now and haven't been drawing for maybe once in a while ad just sketches. however now recovering from depression I want to apply to art school and make a portfolio. I'm going to community college first and taking life drawing classes on weekends. Is it possible to get back into practice and continue to improve and make a good portfolio?

    is the talent always there basically

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  3. #2
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    No.Once you stopped drawing for just a single day your talent will evaporate forever and never come back again. There is just no way training and practice can overcome this ever.

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  5. #3
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    Less "talent" and more "skill", honestly. Just start practicing, and you'll see the answer for yourself.

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    Definitely. I've seen a few people here who stopped drawing for a while and picked it back up. I think Blackspot (one of the moderators) here stopped for over 20 years or so and then picked it back up. I read that a while ago so don't quote me on it.

    I myself stopped drawing for 4 years and just got back into it 5 months ago and since being here, I'm learning more than I ever have. So, stick around.

    Also, don't worry about talent...just practice religiously.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilac View Post
    Is it possible to get back into practice and continue to improve and make a good portfolio?
    Yes. I mean, you already have an advantage over someone who hasn't drawn at all, and people who haven't drawn at all obviously can learn to draw so yeah.
    However, depending on your skill level, how long it takes is a different thing.
    So you probably shouldn't expect to squeeze out a marvelous portfolio in a week.
    Of course this is hard to say because we can't see your art.

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    Thinking now this was a rather lame question to ask...but I couldn't help but wonder if skill can be "forgotten" over time as in you kind of have a drawing acoma? I'm not sure how to explain my question or what I'm trying to say.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilac View Post
    Thinking now this was a rather lame question to ask...but I couldn't help but wonder if skill can be "forgotten" over time
    Maybe. But if you learned it once you can learn it again, right? Even if you slip down a slope you can just climb back up, and it should be easier now that you know it's not an impossible slope and you know at least one route that worked before. Just don't make the mistake of thinking that it's going to be instant. If you have expectations that are too high and it turns out to be a little more difficult then it's easy to get discouraged. So just keep an open mind and keep working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bish0p2004 View Post
    Definitely. I've seen a few people here who stopped drawing for a while and picked it back up. I think Blackspot (one of the moderators) here stopped for over 20 years or so and then picked it back up. I read that a while ago so don't quote me on it.
    Yep, but it has taken a while to relearn line quality and seeing properly, which I'm just about beginning to.

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    You seem young since your talking about college so there's plenty of time. However its like what Brad Rigney said in his video. It's not about "what do I do" to get better at art. It's more about "what am I willing to give up". Put down the bong, put down the controller, and start drawing. I made that choice when I was about 30. For me it was Poker.

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    That is such a strange question.

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    Stop looking for excuses not to try.


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    Lilac,

    I have been where you are in a sense and I will tell you that, YES you can re-achieve anything you became rusty in. I will briefly tell my story: Years ago I wanted to be an Illustrator and due to many things, inherent depression as well as a crippling disbelief in my own abilities...well, I let that pass me by then and settled for something less. Now 13 years later at nearly 42, I am reclaiming what should have been mine before. I am just now in the re-beginning stages of training myself to be an Illustrator. Over the years I never let my Art go completely...taking sculpture and life drawing now and then but still sparsely.

    In my absence from Art, here is what I learned. 1) The heart wants what the heart wants, I am more in love with Art than ever due to our estrangement.

    2) Now I am in the best time of my life to know exactly what I want and let nothing and no one stand in the way.

    3) *This one is really important* I don't need permission (and you don't either). What this means is this: For years I have suffered under the pressure of needing approval from 'someone', maybe it's a part of the depression or my OCD, dunno. I have struggled under so many questions "is it too late?" "am I too old?" "is it that or that...?" "can I this or that...?" "am I good enough?" etc., etc. BUT here's the answer to ALL of them...ready? The answer to all these questions and more is...what do you think? What do you think about your Art? What do you think about your timing? Where do you want to go from here?

    This is the most freeing thing that I have discovered and that I love passing along: "it's just nobody else's damn business!" You see, I thought that I needed "permission" of sorts to be ok, I thought that someone who was in my chosen field had to "bless" my work or even my desire to do it...and God please forbid that they should say I am "too this" or "too that". ...I had to ask myself "who are "THEY"; and the remarkable thing is that once I asked that question "THEY" vanished. There is no establishment, no "salon" as in the very old days. Nope, not one single soul can tell me that "I can't"...except myself. And the same goes for you and ALL Artists on here and everywhere.

    I know I am rambling, pardon me...this is just a subject that I am passionate about. And while I realize it is nice to have approval of our peers, it doesn't determine where I go from here nor IF I go from here.

    So, go forth, make good art...become GREAT...but do it in your way, on your terms and for you; not for a market, not for applause, not because it suits someone else and not because someone tells you to or not to.

    Artists have the power to make worlds...we at least owe it to ourselves to make our OWN world exactly what we want it to be. And if someone doesn't like my world (my Art) or they don't like that I am this age or not that...they can just go make their own world and keep out of mine.

    Last edited by sir jon; October 15th, 2011 at 11:57 PM. Reason: misspelling and grammatical error
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    Quote Originally Posted by vapour View Post
    No.Once you stopped drawing for just a single day your talent will evaporate forever and never come back again. There is just no way training and practice can overcome this ever.
    Just like riding a bicycle!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Ross View Post
    It's more about "what am I willing to give up". Put down the bong
    Certain sacrifices must be made!

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    If you are recovering from clinical depression, be very sure that you can take the pressure of ongoing lessons. Perhaps it will be easier for you to practice for half a year on your own and get your strength back.

    I killed an apprenticeship that meant a lot to me because I started working too soon and I relapsed under pressure.

    Other than that - if the skill was yours, you can get it back. Just start working on it. I was an embroideress. In three years of severe illness where I could not touch a needle, did not forget how to work gold thread and how to place stitches. But after such a long abstinence, I needed to retrain my hand so that I could get the tip of the needle where it belonged on the first try. It was frustrating at first, but the re-learning curve is steep.

    Good luck.

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  21. #16
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    "is it possible to get back into practice?"

    Shure. I do it 4-500 times a year...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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  23. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Stop looking for excuses not to try.
    You're like Yoda, except without the object-subject-verb sentence structure.

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  24. #18
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    ...and Yoda doesn't have a beard...or a Number 4 Filbert...

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
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  25. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ilaekae View Post
    ...and Yoda doesn't have a beard...or a Number 4 Filbert...
    Number 4 Filbert? That's the secret, Kitteh? Hah! Knew you'd let the secret slip some day.

    To the OP, I stopped drawing for a very long time, for various reasons... and I'm talking a very long time. It's like riding a bike; you may be a bit wobbly at first, and it takes a while and regular practice to get your confidence and balance back, but you can absolutely do it.

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    OF COURSE!!!! It gonna take a lot of time though. Just re-learning and practicing the fundermental.The fundermental is REALLy really important. Study other artist work. n DRAW,study,draw and DRAW some more. what are u still reading this for? DRAW NOW!! lol

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    Drawing is just like running
    If you always run - you're probably in pretty good shape.
    If you used to run - It will suck at first, but your muscle memory is hiding in there and it will figure it out again.
    If you never ran- it's going to suck all over- but if your stubborn and keep at it you'll get there. You might never be an Olympian but you will finish the race.

    If you always draw- it doesn't make sense not to.
    If you used to draw- you'll remember things you forgot along the way
    if you never draw- you just have to be stubborn and you'll finish the race some day

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  29. #22
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    Anything's possible !!

    Change is such hard work

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilac View Post
    Thinking now this was a rather lame question to ask...but I couldn't help but wonder if skill can be "forgotten" over time as in you kind of have a drawing acoma? I'm not sure how to explain my question or what I'm trying to say.
    I'm inclined to say no. Even when I go through periods of slow-to-no art, I'm still taking in my surroundings and seeing them with an artistic eye. I find myself mentally mixing paints to match interesting colors I see outside, and I'll mentally critique art I see, etc.
    I surprised myself to find I've been improving even though my art's been slow. As long as you keep looking at the world like an artist, I don't think you will ever truly forget.

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