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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie G View Post
    Yes! What other ratio is there? It's not like you said "It's been mostly traditional" you said "All the work I've done for that class has been traditional." That is evasive!

    If it's in your sketchbook, you wouldn't work on watercolor paper, photocopy it, and paste it in either. That's essentially what you've done!

    Really..? Ok. 50 pages of assorted media other than digital. 4 pages of digital. So 1 page of digital for every 12.5 pages of other media. 1:12.5.

    How is this conducive to my question or topic, again?

    I have it in my sketchbook, and have it available digitally with links to said digital versions, if it's that important. Which it isn't. Because they're 3x5 sketches where the point is the basic composition. It's not some highly-rendered piece of artwork to be displayed to the public.

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    "I took a course in Watercolor 101, and I did an assignment in Corel Painter because it had digital watercolors. Now I wonder why the teacher was so harsh. I'll post up this topic because I think my teacher is saying 'digital is taboo' and mislead the people reading this thread."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    "I took a course in Watercolor 101, and I did an assignment in Corel Painter because it had digital watercolors. Now I wonder why the teacher was so harsh. I'll post up this topic because I think my teacher is saying 'digital is taboo' and mislead the people reading this thread."
    "I'll patronize the OP, give a bad analogy, misunderstand the difference between assigned sketches and an assignment, and misunderstand the topic of the thread."

    Well, that was fun.

    I'm looking to talk about why digital art seems taboo in some areas, using a specific example from my recent experience to give it some merit.

    What?

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    Q:Why is digital art taboo?
    A:It's not.*

    *In a professional commercial art context.

    Anything beyond that, in regards to this specific instance, is something to be discussed between yourself and your instructor. And honestly, if a student of mine was possibly misinterpreting or misrepresenting something I had said to them, in an email exchange, when we hadn't been able to discuss things face to face because the student had missed the class, I might, just might, be a tiny bit ticked off.

    Just sayin'.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    I'm looking to talk about why digital art seems taboo in some areas, using a specific example from my recent experience to give it some merit.
    Because teachers don't want students to get stubborn and only use one media. The point of art school is exploring new ways to make art. It's their job to encourage you to do so.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    "I'll patronize the OP, give a bad analogy, misunderstand the difference between assigned sketches and an assignment, and misunderstand the topic of the thread."

    Well, that was fun.

    I'm looking to talk about why digital art seems taboo in some areas, using a specific example from my recent experience to give it some merit.

    What?
    Yes. Because your example is bad, and you should feel bad.

    You keep going to us and instead of being an adult and talking to your teacher who you are paying money I presume to teach you the process of artmaking.

    So yeah, I'm sorry if I'm a bit patronizing but I dunno, I'd feel insulted if this is the kind of thing you do to a teacher instead of just talking to them.

    You really didn't need insight. I think you got a bit huffed about this and tried to use this as a bad example and blow it out of proportion.

    So quit whining and start working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Q:Why is digital art taboo?
    A:It's not.*

    *In a professional commercial art context.

    Anything beyond that, in regards to this specific instance, is something to be discussed between yourself and your instructor. And honestly, if a student of mine was possibly misinterpreting or misrepresenting something I had said to them, in an email exchange, when we hadn't been able to discuss things face to face because the student had missed the class, I might, just might, be a tiny bit ticked off.

    Just sayin'.
    Fair point. I just wish it wasn't quite so much in my school.

    I forced myself to come to the class in which he explained the assignment while I was sick, and covered the expectations given, just not the class that the sketches were due.

    But you're right, as far as the professor side of this goes, nobody will solve that other than myself and my professor. I was hoping this would turn into a topic about how in many areas, digital is still seemingly a rarity. And it did, for a second or two! Dpaint views digital as easy street. Aly Fell has very similar opinions to me: it's not a substitute for traditional, it's just another media to work with. Bcarman sees similarly as well, he views traditional as something you should learn before going into digital painting. Completely valid.

    It's stuff like this I enjoy reading, as there is no end-all explanation of the digital medium, no art history book to tell you the movements of the medium, etc. Digital is still a brand-new medium, so I think it's healthy to get as much conversation about it as possible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    "I'll patronize the OP, give a bad analogy, misunderstand the difference between assigned sketches and an assignment, and misunderstand the topic of the thread."

    Well, that was fun.

    I'm looking to talk about why digital art seems taboo in some areas, using a specific example from my recent experience to give it some merit.

    What?
    Yes. Because your example is bad, and you should feel bad.

    You keep going to us and instead of being an adult and talking to your teacher who you are paying money I presume to teach you the process of artmaking.

    So yeah, I'm sorry if I'm a bit patronizing but I dunno, I'd feel insulted if this is the kind of thing you do to a teacher instead of just talking to them.

    You really didn't need insight. I think you got a bit huffed about this and tried to use this as a bad example and blow it out of proportion.

    So quit whining and start working.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Yes. Because your example is bad, and you should feel bad.

    You keep going to us and instead of being an adult and talking to your teacher who you are paying money I presume to teach you the process of artmaking.

    So yeah, I'm sorry if I'm a bit patronizing but I dunno, I'd feel insulted if this is the kind of thing you do to a teacher instead of just talking to them.

    You really didn't need insight. I think you got a bit huffed about this and tried to use this as a bad example and blow it out of proportion.

    So quit whining and start working.
    Please stop making assumptions. I've talked to my professor continually about this subject, along with many others, and am still awaiting a reply to continue our already-existing conversation. Therefore, I wanted to see what others thought about digital art not being accepted in certain areas. This is what I was looking for insight. I am discussing, not whining. And I'm off to go back to work while others collect their thoughts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    But you're right, as far as the professor side of this goes, nobody will solve that other than myself and my professor. I was hoping this would turn into a topic about how in many areas, digital is still seemingly a rarity. And it did, for a second or two!
    Digital isn't a rarity.
    The reason you *think right now* it is a rarity is because you are going through art foundation classes, the object of which it to teach you and expose you to a variety of things. Digital is just one small fraction of media available to the artist.

    Foundation classes are meant you give you basic skills, and exposure to a variety of media. So, if there are 10-15 different major types of media, (digital being one of them), then inherently digital will only be covered 1/10th of the time. It's not a taboo, it's just in it's proper perspective on the grand scheme of media in visual arts.

    Once you get into more advanced classes and decide on your specialization, you'll get exposed to more of what your more focused interests are. If you are interested in digital, then you'll have a chance to focus on digital.

    Sounds like the school program is doing what it's supposed to, but perhaps you are misunderstanding what it's goal is, and seem to be hung up on one media, out of many.

    So, digital is not a taboo, you're just not at a point in your art education that has much focus on it. That's probably why not very many people are jumping on discussing digital being a taboo... cause it isn't. It's a lot like posting about, let's discuss why the sky is green, insisting it's green, (and refusing to recognize it's blue, and wondering why people are telling you to take off your yellow filter glasses.)

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    I've talked to my professor continually about this subject, along with many others, and am still awaiting a reply to continue our already-existing conversation.
    Well, if you talked to your prof continually about digital, in a class that isn't focusing on digital, I can see how he is starting to get testy. You just may be being a pest about it. Even here, you acknowledge how ok, more digital will come later, etc... and then two posts later you're back to wanting to talk about how digital is a taboo... like what's been said just went in one ear and out the other.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Julie G View Post
    all the digital tools are based on traditional ones, so if you know the traditional ones, you can pick up the digital tools more easily than if you tried to do it the other way around. .
    Truth. end thread

    "I've had a perfectly wonderful evening. But this wasn't it" - Groucho Marx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    Digital isn't a rarity.
    The reason you *think right now* it is a rarity is because you are going through art foundation classes, the object of which it to teach you and expose you to a variety of things. Digital is just one small fraction of media available to the artist.

    Foundation classes are meant you give you basic skills, and exposure to a variety of media. So, if there are 10-15 different major types of media, (digital being one of them), then inherently digital will only be covered 1/10th of the time. It's not a taboo, it's just in it's proper perspective on the grand scheme of media in visual arts.

    Once you get into more advanced classes and decide on your specialization, you'll get exposed to more of what your more focused interests are. If you are interested in digital, then you'll have a chance to focus on digital.

    Sounds like the school program is doing what it's supposed to, but perhaps you are misunderstanding what it's goal is, and seem to be hung up on one media, out of many.

    So, digital is not a taboo, you're just not at a point in your art education that has much focus on it. That's probably why not very many people are jumping on discussing digital being a taboo... cause it isn't. It's a lot like posting about, let's discuss why the sky is green, insisting it's green, (and refusing to recognize it's blue, and wondering why people are telling you to take off your yellow filter glasses.)



    Well, if you talked to your prof continually about digital, in a class that isn't focusing on digital, I can see how he is starting to get testy. You just may be being a pest about it. Even here, you acknowledge how ok, more digital will come later, etc... and then two posts later you're back to wanting to talk about how digital is a taboo... like what's been said just went in one ear and out the other.
    Not so much continually about digital, but about his issue with the particular assignment, I wasn't presenting anything I think would come off as a pest (IE BUT I WANT TO DO DIGITAL!!!); I realized from the start I need to try to limit myself that I don't become a pest.

    But you're probably right. My patience for foundations is wearing rather thin, as I've been in school for a while (changed majors). So I'll try to not get too ahead of myself.

    Maybe it's just my school's atmosphere, then. Digital really is a rarity around here, so I suppose I am making assumptions in that regard. I certainly know digital is a strong force in certain areas (these forums are more than enough of an example). I'm more hung up on it because I hear hardly any mentions of it, even though several of the illustration professors use it. Patience is a virtue, I suppose. Thanks.

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    I find it annoying that fine art classes and digital classes are rarely on speaking terms. I still can't connect the two very well. I draw much better traditionally, but I'm more productive with digital. My figure drawings aren't carrying over to digital and it pisses me off. I'm starting to see the two are similar but not the same. Drawing naked people isn't the same as character design.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Dude, quit making excuses and just do the assignments like your teacher asked.


    The instructor did not ask the impossible of you.
    I think this should have been the second post in this thread. That way a lot of fat could have been trimmed from the well beaten zombified horse.
    This is a topic that will never have a satisfactory settlement as there are two kinds of people in the world:
    1. Those who pick up the brush, pencil, pen, stylus and make things happen.
    2. Those who land the pinky finger on CTRL and the forefinger on Z, then wait for things to happen.
    No matter how you cut it or over-analyze it with 13 page thesis', it's as simple as that.
    Of course the former is occasionally allowed to do the latter, but the latter with an inability to do the former solidifies this logic.
    The occasional haze between the two can bring unneeded stress to an instructor that needs to be in touch completely with
    their students development in the arts. Following instructions to the letter eliminates this unneeded psycho-fluff.

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    You quoted me verbatim, but bear in mind I was having a slight poke at narrow-mindedness, which was probably a bad idea from me at that moment. Your teacher actually sounds ok, and many here seem to agree that concentrating on learning traditional skills will make your digital work so much better later. You have to learn to mix the cement before you build the house.It is probably wise to accept that your teacher, whom you admit has a lot of experience and a good portfolio, might know what they are talking about. He/she has a personal relationship with you that is worth a million anonymous Internet burbles!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeph View Post
    Maybe it's just my school's atmosphere, then. Digital really is a rarity around here, so I suppose I am making assumptions in that regard. I certainly know digital is a strong force in certain areas (these forums are more than enough of an example). I'm more hung up on it because I hear hardly any mentions of it, even though several of the illustration professors use it. Patience is a virtue, I suppose. Thanks.
    Yea, there could be other things at play with your patience and what not. Maybe you're focusing so much on not having digital so much because what you;re actually doing is not what you expected... and focus on digital is a good distracting reason to ... well, whatever you do in pre-contemplation period when you decide you don't want to do something any more.

    Rather then focusing on digital, I'd try to find someone to talk to that will help you focus on what you really want to do, and then staying focused through the tedium of it. The more you talk, the more I get the impression there's a deeper issue there then digital.

    As far as digital.... my first degree in in engineering, and since recession hit and there is very little engineering going on in my area, I decided to switch to arts, which has been my passion most of my life... and the recession sort of made it possible (it forced me to give up the fat paycheck, and make it work). Between engineering and hobbies, I've been doing digital stuff all my life.

    Recently I decided to start on art foundation classes. My time permits only one to two classes per semester (between some health issues and trying to keep a small freelance business going). I'm on a third semester now of foundation classes, and we haven't touched digital one bit. Till your post it never even so much crossed my mind that digital is being dissed or a taboo of any kind. It's just not what we're focusing on at the moment, no big deal.

    Doing a painting class at the moment, and I'm already seeing that other then the brushes one is using, the general approach to design, lights, darks, contrast, composition, and lot of the process of laying things is is not any different in digital painting (based on what I see in many online tutorials) compared to the oil painting.

    Once you learn the basic DESIGN process of creating something, and a variety of media, you'll be able to adapt them to your media of choice.

    So, my recommendation would be to see what it is inside you that is getting you to a point of internal friction.... Not just for school, but you need to do that for yourself just for life in general. Life is full of tedium and things that aren't going your way... the more you learn to shrug that off without getting tense, riled up or discombobulated in some way, better off you will be on the long run.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post
    I find it annoying that fine art classes and digital classes are rarely on speaking terms. I still can't connect the two very well. I draw much better traditionally, but I'm more productive with digital. My figure drawings aren't carrying over to digital and it pisses me off. I'm starting to see the two are similar but not the same. Drawing naked people isn't the same as character design.
    What is tripping you up with digital?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post
    What is tripping you up with digital?
    basic line and dexterity stuff. I have more control over a real brush or pencil then I do with a tablet. I can draw from the shoulder, I can rotate the surface, I can rest the brush or pencil on it's side, pull organically straight lines, get more fluid calligraphy, draw through my work and I could ramble on. Photoshop has an amazing toolbox to make up for it. I figured I'd be comfortable with it by now. My line work is still jagged and I have to work pretty hard to make it remotely presentable. For me it's a different drawing experience. Physical materials and surface have allot going for them. Little intuitive things like bounce, memory, drip and smudge. But photoshop is just more productive pure and simple.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post
    basic line and dexterity stuff. I have more control over a real brush or pencil then I do with a tablet. I can draw from the shoulder, I can rotate the surface, I can rest the brush or pencil on it's side, pull organically straight lines, get more fluid calligraphy, draw through my work and I could ramble on. Photoshop has an amazing toolbox to make up for it. I figured I'd be comfortable with it by now. My line work is still jagged and I have to work pretty hard to make it remotely presentable. For me it's a different drawing experience. Physical materials and surface have allot going for them. Little intuitive things like bounce, memory, drip and smudge. But photoshop is just more productive pure and simple.
    I've bougt a Wacome recently and I have pretty much the same problem, my linework is simply not as good as it is traditionally, although I seem to somewhat compensate that by painting and adjusting. And digital generally feels a bit too clean, you have to work in making things have 'grit'. I'm enjoying the specific benefits of working digitally though, some of them are really handy. I want to make a curved brush and a cross-hatching brush soon.

    I actually stopped painting a few years ago and solely concentrated on drawing because I realised I was just taking too long with painting and not learning enough. I've been feeling the coloring itch lately though, so I started painting digital thinking it would be sooo much faster, but it still quite time-consuming once you start rendering details. It's not as messy though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raoul Duke View Post
    But photoshop is just more productive pure and simple.
    Hmm, depends. A big thing that makes me way more productive with traditional is actually the difficulty of editing. You really have to work with your mistakes rather than just hitting undo. That makes the whole process faster because I'm not going back and forth all the time, just forward.
    Well with watercolor/gouache anyway. Oil has a bit more of an undo.

    You also have to just stop at some point or you start overworking things. Again making you faster. You have to get it right the first time, but it's faster.

    Physical paint almost does some things for you, digital you have to make every little mark.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Misplacedhippos View Post
    Hmm, depends. A big thing that makes me way more productive with traditional is actually the difficulty of editing. You really have to work with your mistakes rather than just hitting undo. That makes the whole process faster because I'm not going back and forth all the time, just forward.
    Well with watercolor/gouache anyway. Oil has a bit more of an undo.

    You also have to just stop at some point or you start overworking things. Again making you faster. You have to get it right the first time, but it's faster.

    Physical paint almost does some things for you, digital you have to make every little mark.
    I saw this on the last project I was on a few month ago. Because of my traditional background I was creating my assets faster than the digital people who needed fifty layers to do what I did in one or two layers. They were spending most of their time trying to get something they couldn't just paint and draw. They were mashing photos and brush effects and filters trying to make it work to mostly mediocre results. I ended up doing most of the work.

    If you can draw and paint digital is just a tool and it can be faster for you, if you can't draw and paint then pulling photo reference off the internet and piling up layers of scribbling and splattering brush and filter effects won't help you and you end up being a slave to your inability.

    As others have pointed out many times in these kinds of threads they know plenty of people who can't draw and paint working in games. Thats all fine and good but what happens when the style changes to something they can't do with their mediocre skills? I'll tell you what happens, they are out of work. The easier a style is to copy, the faster that style saturates the market by more and more less skilled individuals and it gets left behind. You see it run in 7 to 10 year cycles.

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    So the issue isn't that using layers is bad and having a traditional background is useful I guess, the issue is you have more experience and skill than them. I'm quite sure if they had as much experience in digital as you have in traditional (provided they had learned and not done the same thing over and over) they would have been as efficient, don't you think?

    I find you are coming against digital unfairly. Yes, it can be missused, but so can an airbrush or paint (just watching people do the 1 minute painting of a planet and a pyramid on youtube, you can tell that these people might use paint, they are never going past that one hack.)

    The important part is learning what is important and staying away from the cheap tricks, whatever the media.

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    If anything, this topic reads like there is a taboo towards digital right now.

    Understanding the apparent frustration in certain individuals towards the OP for perhaps asking the wrong question ("my teach thinks" in the message vs "general taboo" in the title,) I think he does have a good point. It looks like digital is frowned upon, while -as Qitsune already pointed out- it's not as much the medium as the used techniques.

    Unfortunately a lot of people do online tutorials without understanding what each step does, which leads to "one-trick-ponies".

    I for one do think that a lot of decent digital artists suffer from the above, being labelled as "cheaters" before they get a chance to prove themselves.

    That said, I also most certainly believe in practising in as many media as you can.

    Just "Dirk" will do!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qitsune View Post
    So the issue isn't that using layers is bad and having a traditional background is useful I guess, the issue is you have more experience and skill than them. I'm quite sure if they had as much experience in digital as you have in traditional (provided they had learned and not done the same thing over and over) they would have been as efficient, don't you think?

    I find you are coming against digital unfairly. Yes, it can be missused, but so can an airbrush or paint (just watching people do the 1 minute painting of a planet and a pyramid on youtube, you can tell that these people might use paint, they are never going past that one hack.)

    The important part is learning what is important and staying away from the cheap tricks, whatever the media.
    Quitsune,

    You're making my point for me. Why do you think they were hired in the first place? Because the tools allowed them to fake something they didn't have. The end result fakes an understanding that isn't there. Its the same in any medium but traditional mediums don't allow the same amount of fakery that digital does. Its too hard to get traditional mediums to give you good results without any skills. That’s why it’s important to learn to draw and paint in a representational manner first before you take too many shortcuts. I'm not against digital I'm against ignorance and stupidity and a lack of basic abilities.

    It happens in traditional too. When I was still doing plein air competitions I would always lobby for a model to come out and pose on one of the days of the event. You would have 40 or 50 so called professional artist who were in the show. The only ones who showed up to paint the model from life were the ex-illustrators; maybe 3 or 4 people.

    The rest of them would say things like I'm a pastoral artist, I don't really draw people or architecture. Which is a nice way of saying I'm a formula painter who only paints things that don't require any level of accuracy so no one can see I have little or no skill.

    The big lie here is that everyone knows that if using digital wasn't easier to get good results with no one would use it. It allows companies to hire people with less skills for less money. Computers allow you to chop those skillsets so small that anyone is replaceable like a lugnut on a wheel.

    Of course if you want quality you can't use those people and you still end up hiring Craig Mullins or Android or Randis or Iain McCaig or anyone with talent for double or triple the pay of your in-house people to come in and do the work for your company even though you have artists already working there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    The end result fakes an understanding that isn't there. Its the same in any medium but traditional mediums don't allow the same amount of fakery that digital does. Its too hard to get traditional mediums to give you good results without any skills. That’s why it’s important to learn to draw and paint in a representational manner first before you take too many shortcuts. I'm not against digital I'm against ignorance and stupidity and a lack of basic abilities.
    !!!!!! this !!!!!!

    This is exactly why I made myself start going to foundation classes. Being a hobbyist and a dabbler in artsy things I developed many good, and many more lopsided skills.
    Last fall I decided to 'forget everything' and start over, 'the right way'. Since I didn't want to try and come up with my own curriculum, I went to a local community college with a strong art program, and started at the beginning....

    It's making a big difference already. Not so much in the work just yet (because I haven't had a chance to do a lot outside of work and classwork), but the changes in my thinking, and understanding, and how I see things are HUGE!

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    Your teacher isn't teaching Photoshop. He expressed his disappointment with you using Photoshop so just re-do your thumbnails and go from there.

    Since you admire his digital skills and since the class he isn't teaching is about digital art, why don't you go to him and private and ask him for tips and advice? Ask if he mentors students. See if he DOES teach a digital art class and enroll in that. If he doesn't, learn Photoshop on your own time and just stick to the parameters in that class.

    Problem solved.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    It happens in traditional too. When I was still doing plein air competitions I would always lobby for a model to come out and pose on one of the days of the event. You would have 40 or 50 so called professional artist who were in the show. The only ones who showed up to paint the model from life were the ex-illustrators; maybe 3 or 4 people.

    The rest of them would say things like I'm a pastoral artist, I don't really draw people or architecture. Which is a nice way of saying I'm a formula painter who only paints things that don't require any level of accuracy so no one can see I have little or no skill.
    Actually, you are making my point too. Digital is not the problem, people who sit on their laurels and stop learning are the problems. I would argue that most of these pastoral painters never touched a wacom pen in their life. However, someone who learned all the foundations digitally would still be more skilled at producing a good image as someone who was lazy with traditional. Painting in the park with a laptop would be a pain in the ass, but that's not what would make them bad artists.

    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post

    The big lie here is that everyone knows that if using digital wasn't easier to get good results with no one would use it. It allows companies to hire people with less skills for less money. Computers allow you to chop those skillsets so small that anyone is replaceable like a lugnut on a wheel.

    Of course if you want quality you can't use those people and you still end up hiring Craig Mullins or Android or Randis or Iain McCaig or anyone with talent for double or triple the pay of your in-house people to come in and do the work for your company even though you have artists already working there.
    Actually, game companies hire people with little or no skills because often people who do the hiring no nothing about art. Also because it's hard to get very skilled artists to do the aggravating day to day stuff that happens in every game company, and they need way more artists than there are skilled artists available, and they just don't train them (I've been fighting in every game company I have ever been the mentality that a crash course in 3dmax qualifies as "art training", and I pay for my own IMC tuition and to get my ass to Illuxcon and I paint on my own time and buy my own books.) So if you were crappy when you started working at a game company, you are going to learn software, but not art.

    Actually, I think we agree on the end result, we just don't agree on how these results happen.

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    I'm seeing a common thread woven in the "art discussion" section of late involving digital art. I've said it in other threads recently and I'll say it again- digital methods are only a medium. Anyone who thinks that people who use Photoshops layer capabilities or various tools and filters are "cheating" or "hiding" from learning how to draw without acknowledging the exceptions to this are being incredibly exclusive. I don't think I need to point out that there are plenty of artists out there who do these things who still know what they are doing as evident by their work. What we are discussing at this point are semantics -To say "if you need to use more than one layer, you don't know how to paint" leaves no room for those that break this stereotype. Yes, many people do use Photoshop as a crutch, but not everyone. And it works the other way around too as Qitsune pointed out. People use whatever they are comfortable with as a crutch and it prevents them from progressing.

    You have people who are biased both ways when it comes to digital and traditional art but we are saying pretty much the same thing- foundation is paramount and no amount of avoidance for the sake of appearances will make you a better artist. Embracing the uncomfortable and unknown is the only way we grow. For the digital artist- it means picking up a pencil and learning the basics. For the traditional landscape oil painter- it still means picking up a pencil and learning the basics.

    Actually I'm under the belief that you can learn the basics with any medium provided you don't use it as a crutch but I would recommend starting with traditional medium. That, however, is a another discussion entirely.

    Last edited by Lithriel; September 27th, 2011 at 05:18 PM. Reason: grammar
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    Digital is just another medium as said a million times before. Throwing texture brushes and photos overlayed into a digital painting won't make someone's art any better than what they could be doing in traditional. It just gets their crappy work out faster.

    BLAHBLAHBLAH
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    The one thing with traditional stuff is that it makes you face your mistakes instead of doing a pastiche trying to fix things and get it right first time.


    I didn't think it was possible to be called an artist when you have nothing to say. It's like being a writer who publishes individual words as books and expects to be praised for it.
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