Page 4 of 35 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... LastLast
Results 40 to 52 of 453

Thread: Pavel Sokov's Sketchbook

  1. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    canada, from russia
    Posts
    3,370
    Thanks
    791
    Thanked 443 Times in 357 Posts
    Jesus fuck Velocity, that is badass looking! I am especially curious about the traingles above their heads, very random but has an air of authority and ritual.

    What did you do to Athena, I can't really tell?

    arenhaus

    Another friend of mine asked for a portrait of her and her parents at the Helsinki figure skating world cup, to give to her parents as a gift.

    I started with opening the photo, and I did these lines right on top of it. I realize its lame to do lines right on top of a photo, but I don't want to spend hours messing up proportions on a piece thats not even for me.

    The point is, I made the following 3d Mesh type lines to breakdown the form. Is that what I was supposed to do all along?

    Pavel Sokov's Sketchbook
    Pavel Sokov's Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,525
    Thanks
    2,469
    Thanked 2,523 Times in 1,570 Posts
    Well, if it helps you, you can do a "3D mesh".

    Only you are still kind of missing the point here. The point of using these construction lines is measurement. You draw them so you can track where the form is. Just drawing them for sake of drawing them doesn't help in the slightest. If you look at your sketch more closely, you'll see two things: 1) you aren't really tracking the 3D form with your construction lines, you have a lot of looseness there even where the face is seen front on and is quite symmetrical, and 2) you've put them in the faces but did a ton of your old 2D contour on the bodies. Your "3D mesh" is still rather 2D.

    All this shows that you still are not thinking in terms of form and volume. Stop thinking with lines and blots; the form and volume are the only thing that should interest you. The picture isn't flat, it's a window into a scene.

    (As a tip, I can suggest drawing with pencil on paper. Control is ten times finer with a pencil, tablets are terrible for sketching. I can do it in need, as you've seen, but if I can avoid it, I never choose a tablet for sketching. Pencil is quicker, easier to control and more expressive. Less indirection between you and the page!)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to arenhaus For This Useful Post:


  5. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    2,906
    Thanks
    254
    Thanked 1,197 Times in 870 Posts
    I'll also add that construction is WAY too early a stage to be adding details such as pupils and individual teeth. Big shapes first, and once you've got a handle on those, start breaking things down to smaller shapes.

    I'll also add that simply throwing a new layer on top of the photo and drawing on that teaches you very little. This might not be for you, but you should try to learn from it.
    The Nezumi Works Sketchbook - Now in progress

    My online portfolio

    Bloggity blog

    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Nezumi Works For This Useful Post:


  7. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    5,459
    Thanks
    6,453
    Thanked 4,521 Times in 2,459 Posts
    "Jesus fuck Velocity, that is badass looking! I am especially curious about the traingles above their heads, very random but has an air of authority and ritual.

    What did you do to Athena, I can't really tell?"

    I love black triangles, theyre my favourite shape.
    I just moved the eye things on her hat, they were tiling upward with a different vanishing point to the rest of the hat and skull, making the drawing look like it was tipping backward.
    sb most art copied to page 1
    Weapons of Mass Creation 2011 ::: Add your favourites!
    skype: velocitykendall
    facebook: Alface Killah
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to Velocity Kendall For This Useful Post:


  9. #44
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    canada, from russia
    Posts
    3,370
    Thanks
    791
    Thanked 443 Times in 357 Posts
    Arenhaus

    I agree that pencil and paper has better control, but I wanted to cheat and make the contour lines straight on top of the photo, because I didnt feel like solving these problems.

    Nezumi

    I completely agree. But recently I got commissioned an oil painting portrait for a family aquantance. I barely know how to use oils, but 52 hours later I percievered and finished a decent portrait. The person never called back to even show up and look at it.

    I am not angry, I just have a different perspective to commissions now. I am not interested in spending 50 hours and then being ditched. I just don't feel motivated for this particular piece. It would take ages for me to make the correct proportions, and they would honestly never be correct.

    Velocity

    Ah I see it now!

    Well here is a portrait of my other friend who made me a website for free. I made the following sketch focusin on finding volume and form. Obviously I am messing up, as the two people have profound differences. I am hoping to avoid drawing the linework right over the photo for this particular piece.

    Pavel Sokov's Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    54
    Thanks
    9
    Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
    When it comes to drawing the planes of the face, where every little tweak in structure is so integral, make sure to draw what is actually there, not what you interpret as being there. I struggle with this too, where I look right past parts of the face that I'm not used to paying attention to, like how the chin juts out, or that way that the eye fits into the eye socket into the cheekbone. Err. This isn't a very lucid post; I was just reminded of my struggle with this. I guess the flesh of what I'm trying to say is that you should pay close attention to the subtleties of the structure of the face.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Conquerrisk For This Useful Post:


  12. #46
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    253
    Thanks
    81
    Thanked 81 Times in 73 Posts
    It's cool to see the comparison of your older work with this bust. Your understanding of transitioning from soft to harder edges is sooo much better.

    I think it's awesome that you're getting rejected only because (from reading your posts) you seem relentless in your pursuit. So that's awesome if you can handle the frustration of not receiving that feeling of success . .. you'll grow faster, you are getting better. . and the success will come. When it does look out, you'll be a beast.

    "harder, better, faster, stronger" yeah-yeah
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Derra For This Useful Post:


  14. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Haifa, Israel
    Posts
    4,525
    Thanks
    2,469
    Thanked 2,523 Times in 1,570 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Pavel Sokov View Post
    I agree that pencil and paper has better control, but I wanted to cheat and make the contour lines straight on top of the photo, because I didnt feel like solving these problems.
    Cheating didn't work so great, did it? This reminds me of those students who spend so much time, ingenuity and effort on cheating that they'd be better off actually studying.

    Work with a pencil, and stop imitating the external features of a method. Follow the meaning, not the appearance of structural drawing.

    Your attempt to draw without tracing shows clearly that it would help to learn to track the form's landmarks without tracing over a photo. Envelope, parallel verticals and horizontals, angle measurement.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to arenhaus For This Useful Post:


  16. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Cambridge UK
    Posts
    5,459
    Thanks
    6,453
    Thanked 4,521 Times in 2,459 Posts
    try to do this in your mind; pick a point, draw an imaginary vertical or horizontal line from it and see how it relates to other things in the reference..helps a lot.
    also remember you can refine it as you go..

    photoshop is cool though cos you can put your referent exactly in line with your canvas which makes comparison easy. poor old sargent had you run back ten paces, hav a look, decide what to do and and how to do it and then run back to his canvas... the genius of the man...
    anyway point is you can blob on big shapes and then figure out the details as a whole to finer and finer detail. that means that your whole face isnt fucked if you get your initial estimate of an important landmark like the chin totally wrong.. its insurance against wasting loads of time.. just some thoughts..
    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; November 2nd, 2011 at 09:55 AM.
    sb most art copied to page 1
    Weapons of Mass Creation 2011 ::: Add your favourites!
    skype: velocitykendall
    facebook: Alface Killah
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. The Following 5 Users Say Thank You to Velocity Kendall For This Useful Post:


  18. #49
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    72
    Thanks
    14
    Thanked 12 Times in 8 Posts
    Pavel, the Athena bust was awesome. You nailed the feeling of light and to me, all the forms read well. This quest for perfection is a fools errand, and if CG society rejected your piece, then excuse my french but fuck their approval. You did good and the Athena piece was a solid effort. Just my 2cents. Overall your drawing could use some work as far as the portrait of your friend goes, but to me like most problems in observational drawing, its a problem in seeing.

    Anyway all this academic talk and high and lofty speech is giving me a headache. Being on this forum makes me forget that art is supposed to be fun..which is the reason some of us started doing it in the first place. Nothing we create will be perfect. Even the "old masters" had glaring flaws in their work. We should always do our best and strive to bring our work up to the pinnacle of our ability. Not saying its acceptable to leave errors in your work and be comfortable with mediocrity, but accept when good enough is good enough and start a new piece that you can learn something new from in stead of spending 100 hours on a painting trying to get it "right". And even if you get it "right", if someone is looking for a reason to give you a critique and find the errors in whatever you do, they will ALWAYS find what they're looking for because nothing is perfect.

    Anyway, take my comment as a grain of salt. I am an amateur and I suck at everything I do and apparently I possess none of the talent many of these people in this forum (including yourself) have. The folks in this forum will probably slaughter me verbally, ignore me, or leave some clipped comment trying to discredit so I'll just beat them to the punch and acknowledge my degenerate and ignorant behavior. Good day sir and keep painting
    Last edited by Amara91; November 4th, 2011 at 06:24 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Amara91 For This Useful Post:


  20. #50
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    2,906
    Thanks
    254
    Thanked 1,197 Times in 870 Posts
    Wow. That's gotta set the record for wordiest asspat on CA. Your trophy is in the mail.
    The Nezumi Works Sketchbook - Now in progress

    My online portfolio

    Bloggity blog

    "Skill is the result of trying again and again, applying our ability and proving our knowledge as we gain it. Let us get used to throwing away the unsuccessful effort and doing the job over. Let us consider obstacles as something to be expected in any endeavor; then they won't seem quite so insurmountable or so defeating." - Andrew Loomis
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  21. #51
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    172
    Thanks
    32
    Thanked 37 Times in 36 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Amara91 View Post

    Anyway all this academic talk and high and lofty speech is giving me a headache. Being on this forum makes me forget that art is supposed to be fun..which is the reason some of us started doing it in the first place. Nothing we create will be perfect. Even the "old masters" had glaring flaws in their work. We should always do our best and strive to bring our work up to the pinnacle of our ability. Not saying its acceptable to leave errors in your work and be comfortable with mediocrity, but accept when good enough is good enough and start a new piece that you can learn something new from in stead of spending 100 hours on a painting trying to get it "right". And even if you get it "right", if someone is looking for a reason to give you a critique and find the errors in whatever you do, they will ALWAYS find what they're looking for because nothing is perfect.
    Well, at least I see that Pavel has asked for this kind of critique and he has gotten very detailed and great answers which have helped him (an a lot of other people on this forum) a lot.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  22. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Minelo For This Useful Post:


  23. #52
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Manila
    Posts
    325
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 66 Times in 45 Posts
    I feel really oddly about this thread. So much useful information but also a lot of seemingly unnecessary snark as well as hurt feelings.

    My one bit of advice for Pavel is not to be in a hurry. Take all the advice that was given to you here and try to apply it. Study form in the way Arenhaus has suggested. Don't expect to take his explanation, try to apply it to a drawing, and expect results right away. It takes a lot of time to be able to get anywhere with your art. I sympathize because I'm on that road too.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  24. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to ryansumo For This Useful Post:


Page 4 of 35 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. SketchBook: Pavel Korovnichenko Sketchbook
    By Korovnichenko in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: March 2nd, 2013, 08:58 PM
  2. Art: TAD Review Pavel Sokov's Portfolio.
    By Pavel Sokov in forum ART PORTFOLIO REVIEWS
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: July 17th, 2012, 11:39 AM
  3. SketchBook: The Alchemy Codex. (Pavel's Continuing Sketchbook)
    By jotham_the_dark in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 15th, 2010, 12:55 PM
  4. SketchBook: Pavel Pangrac sketchbook (almost figurative themes)
    By pavelpangrac in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: August 21st, 2007, 02:20 PM
  5. SketchBook: - Pavel Lazarov - Sketchbook - Vehicle sketches!
    By Pavel Lazarov in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: March 14th, 2005, 05:02 AM

Members who have read this thread: 3

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook