"Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!

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  1. #1
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    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!

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    By using the same hot pink in both faces, you set up an equivalence that I don't think you intended. It's also not a color I would ever associate with "frozen."
    If we could see more of the giant's body it would be clearer what's going on.
    The elf's pose is really awkward, and the rubbery anatomy of her body clashes with the definition of her face and hands. It's obvious which parts you had reference for and which you didn't.
    What in the world is that bright blue smear in the dead center? Because right now it's the most important thing in the picture.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Well this could use some changes. I find it odd that there is no environment--they seem to be in some kind of mystical ether. Where are they? And it might be related to having no environment--the giant does not necessarily seem like a giant. It seems like something in the foreground. The way you have the elf's arm stretching forward like that, you're implying that.

    Honestly, I think you could probly improve this greatly by going back to thumbs and figuring out how you want to portray this scene.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    By using the same hot pink in both faces, you set up an equivalence that I don't think you intended. It's also not a color I would ever associate with "frozen."
    I don't think I gave this the right title. It's more like, "Giant Cursed to an Eternal Stasis Found." I'll be the first to admit that there's a lot of really bad, contrived, convoluted logic going on in this piece, most of which was intended less to tell a story and more to rationalize my plain laziness.
    If we could see more of the giant's body it would be clearer what's going on.
    When I started this piece, I didn't even intend to have anything in the foreground.
    Here's a quick rundown of how disorderly the construction was:
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    "Frozen Giant Found" Critiques would be greatly appreciated!
    The elf's pose is really awkward, and the rubbery anatomy of her body clashes with the definition of her face and hands. It's obvious which parts you had reference for and which you didn't.
    While I was painting the original layout, I just felt the more I refined it, the further it was in a spiraling downwards towards complete disaster. I panicked, and ended up making a lot of very quick and sloppy changes, the arms being one of them. They're literally straight arms bent with the warp tool.
    What in the world is that bright blue smear in the dead center? Because right now it's the most important thing in the picture.
    This is one of those stupid contrived logic things I was talking about earlier. I made this really cool ink-drop-in-water brush, and there just happened to be enough negative space in this piece to squeeze it in.

    The idea was that the giant was caught in a sort of time-freezing aura/forcefield/something, and I figured it would look sort of neat if it illuminated itself when disrupted- in this case, that illumination effect was triggered by the elf reaching out to touch the giant.

    It sounded like a cool idea in my head, and my client either understood what I was doing, or just didn't care, so it stayed.

    Thank you for the feedback! My personal conclusion is that this piece really suffered from a lack of proper planning. I now know that churning out a bunch of thumbnails may feel tedious in the short term, but they're absolutely essential for developing a concrete idea before tacking a large-ish scale piece such as this.


    Quote Originally Posted by Artfix View Post
    Well this could use some changes. I find it odd that there is no environment--they seem to be in some kind of mystical ether. Where are they? And it might be related to having no environment--the giant does not necessarily seem like a giant. It seems like something in the foreground. The way you have the elf's arm stretching forward like that, you're implying that.
    You're absolutely right. Just like Elwell said earlier, I needed to portray more of the giant, because nobody's picking up on the fact that it's... you know, a giant.

    The background was just a series of marks to give the piece a bit of depth, but I now see how hard it is to tell what they are. The idea was that they were in a cave (at some point in the painting process, the elf was an archeologist) but if that's not being communicated immediately, I'm not doing it right.

    Honestly, I think you could probly improve this greatly by going back to thumbs and figuring out how you want to portray this scene.
    I cannot agree with you more. If there's one thing I took away from this painting's process, it's just that- I need to thumbnail my ideas. It seems like such a "duh, no shit" sort of thing, but I overlooked it for the sake of pumping out a painting as fast as possible. In the end, that decision was absurdly counterintuitive.

    Thank you for the feedback! I lost my objective viewpoint of this piece, and really needed to get my minds eye re-calibrated, and you and Elwell did the trick.

    Thanks to both you guys!

    Last edited by Greggers; September 19th, 2011 at 10:52 AM. Reason: how do i shot [quote] tag?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greggers View Post
    I'll be the first to admit that there's a lot of really stupid, contrived logic going on in this piece, most of which was intended less to tell a story and more to rationalize my plain laziness.
    I've said this a million times, but it always bears repeating: illustration is visual communication. In order to effectively communicate something to somebody else, you have to know what you're trying to say in the first place. All your "fumbling around, trying to figure out what the picture is about" stuff should be in the thumbnail/sketch stage, once you get that (really get that), then you move on to the final piece, and every decision you make goes toward reenforcing that central concept/story. That's how you get maximum efficiency for maximum effect, and minimize frustration, wasted effort, and blind alleys.

    As for this piece, you should have stuck with stage four. It's still a mess (as it was bound to be, with your [lack of] process), but has the best good stuff vs. bad stuff ratio of any of them.


    Tristan Elwell
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    I've said this a million times, but it always bears repeating: illustration is visual communication. In order to effectively communicate something to somebody else, you have to know what you're trying to say in the first place. All your "fumbling around, trying to figure out what the picture is about" stuff should be in the thumbnail/sketch stage, once you get that (really get that), then you move on to the final piece, and every decision you make goes toward reenforcing that central concept/story. That's how you get maximum efficiency for maximum effect, and minimize frustration, wasted effort, and blind alleys.

    As for this piece, you should have stuck with stage four. It's still a mess (as it was bound to be, with your [lack of] process), but has the best good stuff vs. bad stuff ratio of any of them.
    This is exactly what I needed to hear. Thank you!

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    I also agree that in stage four she looks like she is having some affect on the gaint in the current stage I don't get that same feeling

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    This thread is loaded with awesome advice!

    I was going to say that her pose looks off, and the colours are (given the original title) not telling the story of whats happening.

    Her hand looks like it it might be the source of the pink colour, like she is imbuing the giant with heat, or on the other hand she might have her hand out checking if the giant is breating (resulting in the funky blue bit, like the cold of the giants breath hit her warm and and turned to fog).


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