How could you get creative?
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Thread: How could you get creative?

  1. #1
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    Question How could you get creative?

    Hello artsy people! I'm somewhat new to this forum, but I just had to make the discussion more public =P

    Well let's be bold here: I've found that, after some huge amount of time invested in constructive and plain figure drawing, creativity seems to be diminished by it. The strongly structured way of drawing humans through bones, muscles, mechanics, etc, has been working also as a big weight for my creativity to develop... Don't know if anyone here feels the same.

    What I'm trying to say here is that all my ideas and weird wishes to transform into pictures I kill them by trying to achieve all of them through structures, through steps.

    the question is: Is it a good idea to just forget, at least for a while, all that structure and draw whatever idea I have without thinking it could turn out ugly, or disproportioned, or with bad anatomy?

    What do you guys do to, not come with, but to develop all the ideas on paper? I just feel like my obsession with drawing well proportioned and anatomically studied figures is getting me stuck with conveying all other interesting ideas.

    So, what do you think?

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  2. #2
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    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
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    You learn the structured way to work, then you have the right tools to break the rules and be expressive.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
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    Go for it. Try it, and see if it works for you.

    You don't really HAVE to do things only a certain way. You don't really HAVE to shade everything, you don't really HAVE to draw with your main hand, you don't really HAVE to make the perspective right, you don't really HAVE to have good anatomy and proportions. In theory, you could get away with anything if you handle it well. There are plenty illustration styles around that void some of the "good draftsmanship" principles while going for design. It's art, give yourself some freedom to experiment.

    If construction is making your brain dry up, makes sense practicing things like spontaneous gestures, continous contours and whatnot. No need to regard them as opposites, even. Whatever you learn can complement your main route. The more different ways you can work, the wider is your arsenal of tools for solving pictorial problems as an artist.

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    You gotta have a balance. Mantaining yourself creative is an integral part of the job of an concept artist/illustrator. You need to train your brain to be creative and you need to train your hand so your creations can be top notch.
    So yeah, let yourself go sometimes. Experimenting and keeping your process of art fun is important, and if you bury yourself with techniques eventually art will be a chore for you.

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    Practice. A boxer, martial artist, jazz musician, etc. all learn the basics and have to think about the basics until the basics become second nature and done without thinking. You can apply the same principle here. Keep drawing from life and practicing as you build your thinking skills by reading, doodling, sketching, and so on. At some point the structure part becomes part of the whole and it happens as you create ideas.

    So it comes down to that magic formula again, work your ass off and the magic might come.

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    You know...I can't even apologize....at first I skimmed the thread and then I stopped and read it in it's entirety. It's a fact that humans can't hallucinate with material they've never seen before (a hallucination can combine physical elements infinitely...but if no founding material is there then the polygraphs usually go off the dam charts). Dude, you already have the right idea to go about your path, why take a tenet of laziness or wasteful over-analytic behavior you've already overcome and reenact it once you're on your way? Stay focused, zip that lip, and continue your studies please. Like the previous posters said, stay on track. Make that cinderblock that was hard to your knuckles be like water over time.

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    Te recomiendo que dibujes tus ideas como quieras, y que te valga la anatomia y las proporciones, pero cuando bayas a hacer una imagen detallada y completa hay si, usa referencia o lo que sea para que te salga todo mas realista.

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    You can do what you want.

    But all creativity happens within limits. You're limited by physics, your materials, your software, your experiences and your skills. But construction and technique are horrible boogeymen that kill your creativity? I don't think so. If there's artists that can work only in black and white and geometric shapes and still find enough creativity to do a lifetime of work then you can manage with a few rules.

    So what's the real problem? That you don't know the rules well enough to be able to play with them or that you need to improve your creative thinking?

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    If you're just drawing for your own enjoyment you can draw however you feel like. I think doing some 'whatever' sketches can be a good thing to loosen up and just have fun. But if you're out to make professional looking work you'll have to work on getting the basics down.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

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    Well, first of all thank you all people! Your comments are quite useful to get going with studies and practice.

    I've read some different opinions here, from trying to set on the basis to really do whatever comes to my mind without taking too much care.

    I guess the thing is to find a good mid point to knowing the basics and to still do whatever I want (at least for personal projects). As NegativePleasure states, balance seems to be the key to success. I also agree with many others here, as soon as I understand the basics, they will come to be of second nature, leaving the path free for creativity to work!
    Perhaps my problem is I usually use the whole of my "art time" trying to get the basics more than right. I'll try to give me some breaks and mess up just with ideas, nothing technical.

    BlackARK 's has a very, VERY, good point here, and I really like the way he states it: I'll stop complaining about my failures and instead keep working hard, that will eventually take me somewhere.

    Nada importa morir, pero no vivir es horrible.
    ----

    I have a S.KETCH.BOOK.!!

    and a blog (with animation stuff): http://animatedskycat.blogspot.mx/

    and a tumblr (with random stuff): http://arturoarias.tumblr.com/
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    If you're still focusing on structure so much that it overshadows your creativity, perhaps it tells you that it hasn't become second nature yet. It's just one of the phases of learning. Once it becomes more of a no-brainer, more of your 'horse power' so to speak can again be devoted to creativity.

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