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Thread: Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

  1. #79
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    I see you sketch with pure black before you go to colour. The thing is some of it stays in places you necessarily wouldn't see it naturally, and has a messy outline. Pure black suggests there is absolutely no light and also tends to look dead and flatten things. I encourage using dark values as they give a certain richness to the picture but use pure black with caution. Different shades of dark browns work well for example, depending on your subject matter.
    Much improvement here, keep experimenting. And don't forget good solid construction.
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  4. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mat Kaminski View Post
    triggerpigking:



    I would highly recommend that you try one out sometime (preferably after you feel comfortable in traditional medias). They are actually pretty fun and can make for a very different experience rather than using just the basic pen and pencils.

    ANYWAY... I am only just now trying out color. I've been using grays and gray scale for a very long time. This is my first semester (of school) using color in any capacity. I've been too used to just painting the grays in on top of the black background. Maybe it would best to consider the base color of the piece first rather than just jumping in with black base. It probably tends to flatten out my pieces because of it...

    Thanks by the way as well... will never stop!
    I actually am planning on getting a tablet soon im getting a hundred quid in a few weeks and wanted to get a cheap one.
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  6. #81
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    Here's the progress so far on the Caravaggio piece...

    Caravaggio - Bacchus - WIP

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Caravaggio - Bacchus - WIP
    Date: March 20, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 2550px x 3000px

    Notes: This was a challenge for a group that I joined on concept art. Sketchgroup GOGOGO!!

    Open Canvas FUN

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Open Canvas FUN
    Date: March 13, 2012

    Notes: Just messing around with a silly painting program late at night.

    ----RESPONSES----
    -------------------

    triggerpigking:

    I actually am planning on getting a tablet soon im getting a hundred quid in a few weeks and wanted to get a cheap one.
    Awesome! I would recommend that you start out with a Wacom Bamboo. It's a good jumping ground, and it's actually what I use at home.

    Rotor:

    I see you sketch with pure black before you go to colour. The thing is some of it stays in places you necessarily wouldn't see it naturally, and has a messy outline. Pure black suggests there is absolutely no light and also tends to look dead and flatten things. I encourage using dark values as they give a certain richness to the picture but use pure black with caution. Different shades of dark browns work well for example, depending on your subject matter.
    Much improvement here, keep experimenting. And don't forget good solid construction.
    Yeah, I agree. I'm learning more and more about color everyday, and it's becoming much more clear that black is not the way to go.

    As you can see with the Bacchus (above), I'm making sure to construct it as in-depth as I can.

    Ohaeri:

    I think I agree here, I don't have much experience with painting (digital or otherwise), but I noticed that if you paint the shadows of an object in the opposite color of the highlight, it tends to make the colors look better/more intense. Obviously this shouldn't be taken off of a cliff because it looks unnatural if you push it too far, but if your colors seem flat or uninteresting you might try it.
    Yeah, I agree completely. It will help a great deal to do it this way rather than using black. I'm pushing this way more and more everyday...

    Riley Stark

    Pretty sizable update. (Nice!)

    Well, my digital stuff is waaay ahead of my traditional stuff (what little that I do - I almost ALWAYS work digitally) so maybe we can help each other out with each other's strengths/weaknesses and flip flop advice. Since digital is what I'm most comfortable with, that's where I can help the most and maybe that'll be my niche where you're concerned. ^_^

    Crit:

    I see the color black. (Or something that's appearing super-close, if not exact, on my screen.) Shame, shame on you young man! XD Black KILLS colors. Never use it. Don't paint ANYTHING with it. It sucks the life out of anything you're painting and will make it look flat / wrong to the eye. (Because even in the darkest of dark-ity darks, it's an actual color -- It's never black. There's no such thing as a true black or white when you're looking to paint things because those two colors always either absorb or reflect the colors that are around them. They're always taking on the tint/color of something else! Even if you THINK something is black or white, look at it again! (When I figured this out it kind of blew my mind. It wasn't something I had ever thought about before and then, when someone pointed it out to me, I was like "Woah." You'll get the full effect if you say that like Keanu Reeves would, btw. Bonus points if you actually do it out loud. XD)

    Get that black out of your swatches! (I saw it in the first piece with the guitar and said "OHNOEZ!", then didn't see it in the swatches on the second piece with the girl and got excited -- then you were sneaky and snuck it in on her face for the eyes/brows/mouth! >:0 Skunked!) The same goes for white, too Don't paint with that either. (For highlights or otherwise. Same rules apply to white as they do to black.)

    That all being said, if you want to do your sketch with black, that's fine. I like that you thinned out your brush to sketch for the last piece with the girl. (It was probably much easier to paint over with the lines being so much smaller so there was much less black to fuss with.)

    </digital crit>

    BTW - I really like the pencil "Rage" piece. Some nice expression on that one! ^_^

    Hope you're going try to start the Caravaggio piece this week -- I'm curious to see what you do with it! (Could be some really good practice for your digital stuff!)

    Keep up the good work!
    It's because of you that I started that Caravaggio piece above...

    It's definitely better to study old masters when painting as it will get you closer to real painting rather than just blindly painting stuff.

    Unfortunately, the face on the left is mine only on the 'rage' piece. The baboon looking thing on the right is a guy from class'. I think it is much more interesting than my piece, but it was fun to throw together.

    Make sure that you try doing some traditional (at least life drawing) at least once a week. Don't let your sketching falter and try a unique type of media (my personal favorite lately is vine charcoal). It really helps you to get better at digital to understand traditionally. Even though they can both be used in the same way. It's just nice to have a portable form (a sketchbook and pencil) to play around with.
    Sometimes it's nice to get out and draw rather than being cooped up inside all the time.

    Thanks a ton for that digital crit. I will make sure to take it to heart for sure!

    -------------------
    -------------------

    Thanks guys... more later.
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  7. #82
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    I like the colors in your "Open Canvas FUN" piece. They're crazy but it's a good kind of crazy.

    The Carvaggio colors looks like they might be too saturated, but it's not finished yet, so it could be the way you work. Just keep an eye on that and make sure they don't end up too bright/strong.
    Let's do this.
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  9. #83
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    Glad to see you started on Caravaggio! I agree with Ohaeri that the colors are coming across a bit too saturated on my end too, but (as she said) that could be just how you work. (Some people work super-saturated and then paint over with more muted tones to blend, not quite sure how you work yet so I can't say.) Watch the proportions on his arm - it's looking a bit scrawny by the bicep area. Otherwise, off to a nice start! I'm going to be working on mine today so hopefully I'll make good progress and have an update to show, too! ^_^
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  11. #84
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    Nice sketchbook Mat I like your sketches although I would advice to try and use less dark lines to separate the shapes and forms and try and use values to do this more if you are indeed going to render to an extent.
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  13. #85
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    This is going to be quite an update, but I still have tons more to do to finish this semester out.

    So I'll just say a few things, then the art.

    Firstly, I am very happy to have been invited to an art group.
    If you don't know what that is, look on concept art and check out these sketchbooks:

    Riley Stark || Liffey || Ohaeri || triggerpigking

    Basically we all draw and paint and things, and then critique each other.
    It's pretty fun -- Riley is actually the one that challenged me to the Caravaggio piece.

    Secondly, this semester has kind of flew by honestly. I've been just rolling with it this semester. Gotten lots of work done overall. That doesn't mean I can take it easy for the rest. Honestly this is the where the real push comes. This is where boys become men... or something.

    Lastly, I just want to point out in advance that I have soooo much more art than what is below to update this time. I just got lazy and didn't get to the scanner to get all of my life drawing / gestural drawing / sketches in graphite and things.

    I have to get that on here as soon as possible though.

    Anyway... here's that art I was talking about...

    Caravaggio - Bacchus - WIP 2

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Caravaggio - Bacchus - WIP 2
    Date: March 20 - 24, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 2550px x 3000px

    Notes: This was a challenge for a group that I joined on concept art. Sketchgroup GOGOGO!! Just continuing... slowly but surely!

    Charcoal from Drawing II

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Charcoal from Drawing II
    Date: January - March, 2012
    Medium: Charcoal / Chalk
    Scale: Varies, from 20" x 30" up to 40" x 60"

    Notes: This is my discovery so far into charcoal and chalk from Drawing II. Honestly, this is the most fun I've had with a simple drawing media. All of these pieces are on high-quality Canson stock paper. They are extremely large by my usual standard. See above for the scale... they're pretty big!

    Ink Drawings from Drawing II

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Ink Drawings from Drawing II
    Date: January - March, 2012
    Medium: Ink / White Paint
    Scale: Varies, from 20" x 30" up to 40" x 60"

    Notes: This is my discovery so far into ink and white paint from Drawing II. All of these pieces are on high-quality Canson stock paper. They are extremely large by my usual standard. See above for the scale... they're pretty big!

    Cora's Journal - Colored

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Cora's Journal - Colored
    Date: March 27, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 3000px x 3000px

    Notes: For my final for animation, we are to storyboard out a two-to-three minute animatic for the class, so I am going to start throwing a ton of stuff up about Cora for the next few weeks on top of all the rest of the stuff. This is her journal (and YES it talks).

    ----RESPONSES----
    -------------------

    [b]TFsean[b]:

    Nice sketchbook Mat I like your sketches although I would advice to try and use less dark lines to separate the shapes and forms and try and use values to do this more if you are indeed going to render to an extent.
    Yeah, I do agree about the rendering, but honestly, I think that would be better suited for charcoal or even chalk. I don't know really... I really like this hatching technique over fully blended graphite. But there are times that I should practice it more of course.

    Thanks for the advice! I'll try to follow it more.

    Riley Stark:

    Glad to see you started on Caravaggio! I agree with Ohaeri that the colors are coming across a bit too saturated on my end too, but (as she said) that could be just how you work. (Some people work super-saturated and then paint over with more muted tones to blend, not quite sure how you work yet so I can't say.) Watch the proportions on his arm - it's looking a bit scrawny by the bicep area. Otherwise, off to a nice start! I'm going to be working on mine today so hopefully I'll make good progress and have an update to show, too! ^_^
    I think I use the method mentioned... I actually hadn't noticed the bicep problem. I'll have to take a closer look at it. Thanks for pointing it out!

    I'm watching for your update on it

    Ohaeri:

    I like the colors in your "Open Canvas FUN" piece. They're crazy but it's a good kind of crazy.

    The Carvaggio colors looks like they might be too saturated, but it's not finished yet, so it could be the way you work. Just keep an eye on that and make sure they don't end up too bright/strong.
    Thanks for the compliment on the OC Fun piece. It was just a late-night randomness kind of thing LOL!

    Hopefully the colors are muting more since I'm starting to blend them together. You'll have to let me know.

    -------------------
    -------------------

    Thanks for the comments folks! Time to get back to painting and things...!
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  14. #86
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    Nice update. I especially like the last piece in the 'ink' category. (The one with all the different objects in it.) The ink looks really nice, almost like a loose wash or something. I can't say for sure what the technique is (because I've never worked with ink), but I like it.

    Your master study is coming along -- I think part of your proportion problems is because you're working on an oddly sized canvas. Usually when you do a master study, you make the proportions of your canvas the same size as your reference, so that you can measure and 'copy' the piece accurately. I'd adjust your canvas size and maybe it'll help you gauge things a little easier?

    Also, while you're learning, I'd suggest shying away from the method of working super-saturated (which the colors still look way overly saturated - could your monitor need to be calibrated?) and then trying to tone it down after -- One of the great things about a master study is trying to train your eyes to see color accurately, how to pick them out as close as you can to understand how the master used their colors. (Which you then absorb that knowledge and apply to your own work, thusly improving it.) If you're working super-saturated and then trying to tone it down, you're making things harder for yourself in that you're creating far more work (because you're essentially painting things twice -- once in your colors and then going over them again to try and fix them), and you're also not helping to train your eye how to pick colors from what you're seeing. Try to pick the colors correctly the first time -- it'll speed up your work process and you'll also start developing how to gauge colors correctly. (Especially useful if you need to capture something quick - like something from life where the light might be changing or something. If you work your method, you'll paint your saturated colors and risk losing your reference by the time you get those all down to fix them to their correct shades. The light might have changed, your subject might have shifted - the initial moment you hoped to capture will be gone and you don't have enough knowledge yet to fix it from your imagination, if that makes sense.)

    I'm curious about this 'Cora' thing. Is it a character you made up for the project? Sounds like it could be interesting. ^_^
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  16. #87
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    You know, this is what I get for not updating in a week with finals so close... a MASSIVE upload.

    Okay, so I don't really have a whole lot to say except that I am plunged neck-deep in schoolwork. I have a ton of things to do if I want to pass this semester with even a semblance of hard work and worth-while.

    So I'm just going to rush into it, I have more storyboard stuff to do...

    Tattoo Design

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Tattoo Design
    Date: March 16, 2012
    Medium: Graphite
    Scale: Original is 9" x 12"

    Notes: Actually... the first tattoo design I've ever done. It was based on the Paladin's Cross (basically a sword and shield designed to be a cross). Blend that with tribal. Mix in a blender... BAM that's what happens.

    Book Battle

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Book Battle
    Date: March 30, 2012
    Medium: Graphite
    Scale: Original is 9" x 12"

    Notes: Ashley and her Mom were both reading books and I felt dumb not being in on the awesomeness... SO I just decided that I should draw them both. Was fun to characterize them both.

    Charcoal Studies from Life

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Charcoal Studies from Life
    Date: March 19 - 27, 2012
    Medium: Chalk, Charcoal, Conte
    Scale: Sketches are 9" x 12", the scene at the bottom is 30" x 45"

    Notes: Yet again, more delving into vine charcoal. That has to be my favorite media so far...

    Color Theory -- Altered Palette

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Color Theory -- Altered Palette
    Date: March 19 - 22, 2012
    Medium: Gouache
    Scale: Each piece is 9" x 12"

    Notes: This was a test to use a very limited amount of colors to for interesting color reactions. I should have covered the paint area better.

    Altered Palette Studies

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Altered Palette Studies
    Date: March 19 - 22, 2012
    Medium: Watercolor / Graphite
    Scale: Each 'page' is 9" x 12"

    Color Theory -- Limited Palette

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Color Theory -- Limited Palette
    Date: March 26 - 29, 2012
    Medium: Gouache
    Scale: Each 'piece' is 7" x 10"

    Notes: We were supposed to copy the piece and then do it each with a slightly more muted and grayed out palette.

    Limited Palette Studies

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Limited Palette Studies
    Date: March 26 - 29, 2012
    Medium: Gouache / Graphite
    Scale: Original is 9" x 12"

    Life Drawing in Graphite

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Life Drawing in Graphite
    Date: March 26 - 28, 2012
    Medium: Graphite
    Scale: Each 'page' is 9" x 12"

    Notes: I was going back to a media that I haven't used for some time: Graphite. I have been using nothing but paint and charcoal for quite a while.

    Joe #1

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Joe #1
    Date: March 31, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 2550px x 3000px

    Notes: So, I actually lost a bet with my fiancee, and NOW I have to draw Joe Mangiello (or however his name is spelled) twenty times. Hopefully it will help a ton with anatomy. Damn Mr. Muscles hahaha!

    Lamia -- WIP

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Lamia -- WIP
    Date: April 2, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 3000px x 1850px

    Notes: I noticed an interesting competition on Deviant Art, to redo a mythological creature. And what better creature than a lamia! How interesting!!!

    Life Drawing in the Park

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Life Drawing in the Park
    Date: March 3, 2012
    Medium: Graphite / Ink
    Scale: Each piece is only about 2" wide.

    Pirate Portrait Study

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!
    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Pirate Portrait Study
    Date: March 20 - 24, 2012
    Medium: Photoshop
    Scale: Original is 2400px x 1950px

    Notes: Another challenge I saw on Deviant Art. I'm trying to just start entering a ton of competitions for fun, and JUSTICE.

    Wacky Life Drawing

    Sketchbook... Round 2! FIGHT!!

    Title: Wacky Life Drawing
    Date: March 22, 2012
    Medium: Graphite
    Scale: 9" x 12"

    Notes: Using Life Drawing and combining Marko Djurdjevic / Wes Burt style again. This is so cool and fun to do. I'll have to do EVEN MORE of it.

    ----RESPONSES----
    ---------------------

    Riley Stark:

    Nice update. I especially like the last piece in the 'ink' category. (The one with all the different objects in it.) The ink looks really nice, almost like a loose wash or something. I can't say for sure what the technique is (because I've never worked with ink), but I like it.

    Your master study is coming along -- I think part of your proportion problems is because you're working on an oddly sized canvas. Usually when you do a master study, you make the proportions of your canvas the same size as your reference, so that you can measure and 'copy' the piece accurately. I'd adjust your canvas size and maybe it'll help you gauge things a little easier?

    Also, while you're learning, I'd suggest shying away from the method of working super-saturated (which the colors still look way overly saturated - could your monitor need to be calibrated?) and then trying to tone it down after -- One of the great things about a master study is trying to train your eyes to see color accurately, how to pick them out as close as you can to understand how the master used their colors. (Which you then absorb that knowledge and apply to your own work, thusly improving it.) If you're working super-saturated and then trying to tone it down, you're making things harder for yourself in that you're creating far more work (because you're essentially painting things twice -- once in your colors and then going over them again to try and fix them), and you're also not helping to train your eye how to pick colors from what you're seeing. Try to pick the colors correctly the first time -- it'll speed up your work process and you'll also start developing how to gauge colors correctly. (Especially useful if you need to capture something quick - like something from life where the light might be changing or something. If you work your method, you'll paint your saturated colors and risk losing your reference by the time you get those all down to fix them to their correct shades. The light might have changed, your subject might have shifted - the initial moment you hoped to capture will be gone and you don't have enough knowledge yet to fix it from your imagination, if that makes sense.)

    I'm curious about this 'Cora' thing. Is it a character you made up for the project? Sounds like it could be interesting. ^_^

    Well anyway... that's that, see ya guys next time.
    Thanks, my teacher really enjoyed that one too. It's called ink wash. Basically just take india ink and dilute it with water more and more. It helps to get different tones. You should try it, it's really fun.

    With the Caravaggio, I'm actually working from a real piece. I have a print that I use at home. The colors are COMPLETELY different from what I see online. Weird... The book itself is 9" x 12", but I think the image itself is like 4" or so... I'll have to measure it.

    Anyway...

    The Cora thing is a build up over the entire semester. You should look earlier in the book. There are a ton of pieces about her. I've been doing my animation stuff with it. You'll see more in the coming of it as well.

    Thanks though, more coming...

    ---------------------
    ---------------------
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  17. #88
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    I'm curious to know that what style of art you're ultimately working towards? Like, if knowledge/ability was put aside, which genre of art you'd see yourself mostly doing? (I see you testing a lot of different styles and was kind of curious to know if you tended to favor any particularly - just so I can understand you as an artist better, since I really don't know you all that well yet when everything's said and done.)

    The life stuff is looking good. I like the piece that's the guy in the loin cloth (from behind) with the spear and then the studies from the park the best out of the bunch. Also, that piece that's the night scene -- reverse white on black. That's pretty cool, too.

    On some of your figures, I'd ease up on the thickness/darkness of your outlines. When your outlines are darker than the shadows on the figure, it makes it feel kind of flat/cartoonish. (Darker edges just seem to make it more difficult for a form visually to turn in 3D space. I think it's the abruptness of the edge - it's so dark, and then there's nothing, so it feels flat. Lighten it up a bit and I think your figures will jump ahead. Your graphite stuff, for instance, has a much better balance of edges/shadows than your charcoal stuff. Granted, the graphite probably has a much finer edge than the charcoal you're working with, but lighten your hand up with the graphite to compensate a bit. Try to draw with more confident lines, too, and get rid of the 'sketchy' feeling. It's easier said than done, I know -- I struggle with it at times, too.)

    The comments about dark edges/thick line work applies to your digital stuff, too. You don't need to sketch with such thick lines -- it's making it much harder to see the true nature of some of your shapes. And, if you try to paint over the thick lines, it can throw your proportions off, too. Take, for instance, the sketch of Joe Manganiello. Is the actual figure designated to the painted areas or are the outside edges of the black outlines the actual edges of his figure? That'd be a pretty big difference proportion-wise in some areas if you paint over the outlines, or if you were to simply delete them. One would be considerably bigger in parts than the other. If you sketch with thinner lines, however, you'll get a much more accurate judge of proportions/shapes, especially if you're planning to paint things after the sketch. (I hope that makes sense the way I worded it. XD ) Try to make your digital brush the size about the size of an actual pen tip and see how you do sketching with that -- I bet your sketches will be much easier to read and work with. (Think of how much easier it would be to paint in the life sketch of the guy with the loin cloth and the spear vs. painting in your sketch of Joe, for instance. Especially if you decide to delete the sketch when you're done -- you'll wind up with something much more consistent. If you were to paint in the sketch of Joe around the lines you currently have, you'll wind up with gaps in the paint if you delete the line work, which makes it almost useless to lay the paint down beforehand -- you'd wind up with something that looks more like pieces of a puzzle on your paper than a solid figure.)

    Also, digital tip: Always tone your background before you start painting. If you paint your colors (or even just values) against white, you're going to have a hard time judging their true intensity/value accurately. (How can you tell how light or dark something is when it's just against stark white? Everything is going to look darker when compared against it so, if you decide to put a background in there after the fact, it'll throw all the values you've already laid in off because now you'll actually have something to compare them against. It makes it very hard to make your figure feel like it's meshing with the intended environment if you do the process in reverse. You don't have to go crazy -- just lay down a neutral medium-value/color and you're good to go, kind of like you have in the piece with Joe. It'll help you to get the most out of your lighting and your shadows. Notice how much easier it is to establish lighting, for instance, in your Joe piece than in your other piece with just the guy's face? You can tell where the lights and darks are on Joe instantly, but the face is much harder to judge the lightest of lights because they're almost exactly the same as the background. You throw a background on the face piece, it'll change the intensity of the already established values entirely.)

    As far as Caravaggio goes, I think it's kind of cool that you're working from an actual print instead of one off the computer. It would make it harder to make sure the canvas size is the same (obviously) but, I think if you can at least keep the proportions/edge dimensions generally the same, you'll be in good shape for eyeballing the placement of things in the painting. (You could always just grab a cap of the painting off google and use the general dimensions of the image for your canvas, then toss the picture itself and use your print as your actual reference. That's probably what I'd do and save myself a bit of headache trying to figure out how big the edges should be by actually measuring them out and then trying to translate that into my computer.)

    Glad to see you're getting so much done with summer approaching. (I know that this time of year with school is crazy, trying to wrap everything up!) Keep up the hard work -- Looking forward to your next update! ^_^
    Last edited by Riley Stark; April 5th, 2012 at 06:44 PM.
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  19. #89
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    When I was still doing fractal art, I found doing competitions to be really helpful to my development once I got past a certain point of skill. Like, I wouldn't want to embarrass myself, but if I thought my relative skill level was good enough to make an okay showing of it I would enter. I also found doing requests to be extremely helpful. They were free so there wasn't any pressure, but I also had an audience that I could aim it toward.
    Let's do this.
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    Hey there, I see you've done a lot of explaining, and also a LOT of experimenting. That is fantastic, I'm sure your knowledge and understanding of certain principles,elements is leveling up rapidly. I can't relate that well to the images in general, I'm not sure if you get this a lot, but what is your overall style? what appeal are you going for? where would you say your avenue in art is? Kinda hard to tell by just skimming through- you should be able to- that is, to recognize an artists style by skimming... No one has time to go through every single post in every sketchbook, especially for the art admirers like myself-- So, trying to relate to most of your posts as a whole I would say is kinda hard-- not that every artist should be pinpointed (we are in a post-modern age after all) I believe... But I guess all of that just makes you interesting. You're very explorative that is. uhm.. keep it up I guess, if you know where your aim in life for art is- that's all that matters.

    Maybe you have the makings of a teacher.. I dunno lol.. you can freely disregard all of what I said, I'm not here to crit.. PEace bro!
    Behind every great master is a great student...

    Imagination is more important than knowledge- Albert Einstein...
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  23. #91
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    I'd agree that it's hard to make an opinion on your SB. While you need line for your animation, it isn't necessary as much when you''re doing studies or life drawing. I feel that you're drawing in isolation and rushing through everything. Before starting a study think of what you want to accomplish and how you'll get there. This isn't a race to see how many pieces you can push out. Speed will come with time, but you need to slow down and push those studies a lot further before moving on. Work on making your forms more solid and in their own space.
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