Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 31

Thread: Ambition > Drawing skillz

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 448 Times in 245 Posts

    Ambition > Drawing skillz

    Here I would like to share with you my newest adventure. Any kind of feedback is welcome but I would love to hear some opinions especially on the composition.

    This is "The Execution of Lady Jane Grey", and it started out as a really, really boring composition: http://imageshack.us/f/9/ladyjanegreywip2.jpg/
    So I decided it needed more drama and more people.

    ... and this is my new solution. Can I get away with it?
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,895
    Thanks
    901
    Thanked 949 Times in 814 Posts
    Hi matey

    yes its me again trying to help out, oh dear! LOL

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pa..._Jane_Grey.jpg

    It's one from the national gallery by Paul Delaroche and is actually the Execution of Lady Jane Grey

    have a look at the composition in this one and compare it with yours, maybe it will point you in a good direction!?

    I hope so, all the best with the work and I shall help if and when I can
    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Lightship69 For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,022 Posts
    IS there a particular reason you want to do this vertically? Because a horizantal composition would seem more appropriate for this sort of multi-figure historical work. Also, Queen Jane, with the one raised knee, seems a little odd and overposed to me, and the sleeveless shift looks anachronistic, even for a condemned woman.

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 448 Times in 245 Posts
    Thank you Lightship and Elwell! I know the Delaroche painting, and that's a reason I chose the vertical format. I'm afraid my work might resemble his painting too much if I use a horizontal composition, I want it to be distinctly different from Delaroche's. After all, I'm already heavily influenced by the 19th century painters ...

    The composition seems to work okay (please tell me if you think otherwise, if there are great blunders I'm still blind to them) Agree about her pose and the dress, will fix that! I'll also check the whole thing in grayscale; the value range can be improved.
    Perhaps I can find more little ways to add more drama and interest...

    This problem solving stage is my favorite stage
    Last edited by Maidith; September 5th, 2011 at 11:44 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,924
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 825 Times in 678 Posts
    Nice work. The composition feels somewhat static, though, because every element here is either a strong horizontal or a strong vertical--no curves, no diagonals. (Compare with Rosso Fiorentino's Deposition (1521), attached below, where there are lots of diagonal elements to move the eye around.) The figures in your picture aren't interacting with one another (they're not even making eye contact), which feels a bit odd to me...everyone's off in their own private universe.

    Also, everything here except for Lady Jane Grey herself is in the midrange, value-wise, which makes the picture feel sort of flat. If it were me, I'd organize stronger figure/ground relationships between people (or groups of people) and the background architecture. Diagram attached below (and the Fiorentino may also be helpful in this regard.)

    Ambition > Drawing skillz

    Ambition > Drawing skillz
    Last edited by Giacomo; September 5th, 2011 at 02:28 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to Giacomo For This Useful Post:


  10. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 448 Times in 245 Posts
    Yesss! DIAGONALS! That's what I was looking for without realizing what I was looking for!
    Thank you Giacomo, that was a great help.

    I tried to break up some straight lines (cute little doggie!) and added diagonals (wooden beam, Jane Grey herself, gap between spectators)

    I want to show the moment where the executioner asks for forgiveness from the condemned, as it was customary in that time.

    Here's the current version. Has the allover wider value range made it more consistent and less flat? Or does it perhaps make the image chaotic? :
    Ambition > Drawing skillz

    The same with a "vignette". Effective device or too obvious?
    Ambition > Drawing skillz
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,924
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 825 Times in 678 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Maidith View Post
    Has the allover wider value range made it more consistent and less flat? Or does it perhaps make the image chaotic?
    It still feels flat. The problem is that right now it is a complex, spatially deep composition and everything is the same value. For the image to read as 3D, each of the various elements needs to be substantially darker or lighter than the thing it's in front of or behind. That is a huge conceptual simplification (you can also indicate a figure/ground relationship with color, rather than value) but I hope it makes some sense--JPEG attached below. Hopefully you can see how even in that crude thumbnail, the spatial setup of the scene is immediately apparent.

    Ambition > Drawing skillz
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Giacomo For This Useful Post:


  13. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 448 Times in 245 Posts
    Current version.
    Thank you Giacomo =) I think I'm beginning to understand. Do you think so too?

    Ambition > Drawing skillz

    Decided to draw her looking up because visible eyes add interest, and I noticed that no one else's eyes are actually visible here.
    Need.... sleep...
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    85
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
    Ha! Great job...looks like a Caravaggio. Oh, and as far as being "static" well most of those old paintings were....so it fits and adds to the charm IMO.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Maggietoh For This Useful Post:


  16. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    1,119
    Thanks
    148
    Thanked 503 Times in 314 Posts
    If this was my piece, this is what I'd do. I'm a big fan of stretchy/swoony poses. Thinking of Waterhouse's Saint Eulalia, also many crucifiction scenes . White skin against dark background always makes for more interest/ contrast and was a trick used by Sargent, Waterhouse and Bougueareau. Also the priest's arm and hand in the background were gigantic compared to his body. Anyways, that's usually how those painters created diagonals -- using the bodies in the piece to lead the eye around. An outflung arm here, a leg there. I'm going to also have to second Elwell in saying that the vertical composition makes it sort of awkward and cramped. Dunno.

    Attachment 1317260
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to RyerOrdStar For This Useful Post:


  18. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Posts
    972
    Thanks
    618
    Thanked 448 Times in 245 Posts
    Thanks so much for the input (and for pointing out the priest's hand, I made it smaller here). I'm not using the swooning version though (sorry!) I think it makes the image harder to read. Viewers may think: "Why is she lying there dead? I thought she was gonna be beheaded?"

    You're right about the composition being a bit cramped or awkward. Anyway, I'm gonna finish it like this, there's no going back at this stage. I will use the horizontal format next time when needed, I promise.

    Next on the agenda: people in the foreground, straw.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. #12
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,211
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,022 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Maggietoh View Post
    Oh, and as far as being "static" well most of those old paintings were...
    Umm...
    Define "most."
    Define "old."
    Define "static."
    (Looks like it's time for somebody to hit the art history books.)

    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  20. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  21. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    1,924
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 825 Times in 678 Posts
    That's better, but it seems to me there needs to be more aggressive contrast between elements value-wise. The viewer's eye needs to move around. (JPEG attached.)

    Also, the gestures of the figures you've rendered so far feel a bit lacking in drama...I'm not really feeling much emotion from them. Jane Grey's expression right now looks like that of a teenage girl who doesn't want to take out the trash. If it were me, I'd rethink the poses on all five of the figures on the platform before diving into detailed rendering.

    Ambition > Drawing skillz
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  22. The Following User Says Thank You to Giacomo For This Useful Post:


Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Guaging Art Skillz with Handwriting style
    By BardScars in forum ART DlSCUSSION
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: May 5th, 2012, 10:48 PM
  2. SketchBook: Fuelling Ambition
    By Jdhughes in forum Sketchbooks
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: September 1st, 2011, 01:15 PM
  3. Replies: 30
    Last Post: March 20th, 2011, 02:24 PM
  4. Such A Strange Ambition
    By Azurelle in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: December 11th, 2007, 02:40 PM
  5. No ambition to finish the Lizard Cowboys
    By Nucleardan in forum ART CRITIQUE CENTER
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: September 13th, 2003, 08:14 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook