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  1. #31
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    Nice job on the raccoon's! They look awesome. keep up your awesome work.

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  3. #32
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    Hi,
    Good to see you taking this seriously, I think an important thing for you would be to try worker with harder and much bigger brushsizes. This will help you understand certain "planes" and shapes in objects. If you just color an area in using small strokes, you're focusing on the strokes rather than on what you're trying to describe.
    Take this mountain for instance, http://attachments.conceptart.org/fo...1&d=1317753452 All of those little brushstrokes in the mountains could've been done with a brush maybe three or five times as big. Increasing the feel of a solid object.

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  5. #33
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    The first piece is a sketch of a group of guys that come to my work (coffee place) every Friday to play chess so I found the time to draw them and it was fun as they were focused on their game and didn't notice me.
    The second is a feather, that same feather in an empty mustard bottle and my father. He sure loves to challenge me.
    The third is just a quick 20 minute sketch of a nude male. I found a great new website of nude poses (will post it later).
    I finally decided to participate in one of the community activities: Teen Challenge. This week they requested a design of a WWII Fighter Plane.
    I didn't have enough time to finish it as I was at my girlfriends place the entire weekend but I guess the community activities main goal is to just get us all to draw, which I did. I may colour the WWII Fighter piece later on but honestly I'm not a big fan of the genre.

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  6. #34
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    Sketch done from a pose found in http://www.artsyposes.com/

    It truly is a great website.

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  7. #35
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    I didn't know about artsy poses, I'll bookmark and hit that in the future for sure! Thanks for the link!
    I like pixilovely quite a bit - donno if you've found that one yet.

    I really like your fighter plane, my husband is a pilot/airplane mechanic so when ever he sees something plane related he bothers me about it- he likes it too lol
    I think he has a radar, or spies on me or something....

    Also , the adorable little creature that's upside down on post 33 is awesome, even if I had to stand on my head to look at it ^_^

    happy sketching!!!

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  9. #36
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    It's been long since the last update but I have been super busy with work and studies.

    I recently got offered to do another voluntary project - illustrations for a children's book so maybe I'll post some stuff on that later but the main reason I haven't updated is that most of my latest work, and their is loads, has been in pencil, acrylic, oil, water and charcoal. I don't own a camera so I didn't take any pictures of them. Maybe I will some day.

    The poster is finished and has been printed, sadly the dead trees didn't come up in the print. They say to stay away anything above 80% black so that's one lesson learned.

    The second is a sketch of an illustration of my girlfriend (eyes are still not where I want them to be). I want to give it to her as a present.

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  10. #37
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    Hey man, thanks for always dropping by!

    Good work on the portrait so far! Her left eye seems to be a bit off, perhaps try rotating it a bit. (The inner corner seems to be a bit too low). Also her shoulders might be a tad too broad, not sure as I don't have the reference image

    Keep on rocking

    "What does it mean to be an artist? It's constant, unrelenting, everlasting failure. That's what it is. You have to be really tough to take it." -Carl Larsson

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  12. #38
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    Hello Mr Catman.
    I'd say you try using a hard brush and to pretty hard edges to get a more sharp and not so blurry feeling. For example use the smoth brush for smoth areas like skin(but not at the edges only if the purpose is to make the "thing" being in lack of focus). I'll also suggest you read some about "how to get depth" inte mostly the values.
    Otherwise keep it up, hope this dosen't sound all to harsh. And sorry for bad english hope you understand.

    Edit: the thing about brushes is only how I paint so it's just a suggestion or what to call it.

    Stay bacon.


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  14. #39
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    hey dude, cool stuff you have here, keep working hard!

    one piece of advice i could give you is when you're painting, you tend to scribble with a very small brush, and it seems that it will make things look really real because you can do a lot of detail. it actually doesn't work out that well in practice. the eye doesn't take in every detail when you're looking, especially when it's taking in something that's not in focus. there's generally one point where the eye is focused, and the rest of what you're looking at blurs together. the eye is pretty amazingly designed, but i won't go into that. lol. basically, starting with the big shapes first builds a good base from which to make everything else, and then you put smaller and smaller details in until you get to your point of focus. i'll do a quick paintover to show you what i mean. i hope this helps, please let me know if you get me. g'luck, and take care!

    -A

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  16. #40
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    Purb36: Thank you very much Purb. I await to see this paintover and yes your post was helpful

    Baconstrap: You aren't harsh at all thanks for the advice.

    Kvenh: Thanks Kven. You were right, the shoulders weren't right and the eyes weren't correct. I fixed it a bit let me know what you think.

    Quite a big update on the piece - still not 100% happy with it but its getting there.

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  17. #41
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    not bad for a beginner just keep studying and drawing

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  18. #42
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    Alexandra said: "When I reach heaven I want to be on a huge flying fantastic ship sailing through the clouds".

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  19. #43
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    I like your stuff! You're showing some improvement. Especially in that ship.

    I second everyone who's talking about structure. Without structure, the end result falls apart. I'm surprised nobody seems to have mentioned Loomis yet -- get a hold of his ebooks (you can get them for free online) and do some studies of head structure. Things like seeing shapes in the face, proportion, things like that.

    As for your bigger pieces, the colours tend to look a bit muddy. Your value needs some work, too -- some studies of black and white photos are good for learning value.

    Hope to see more soon!

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  21. #44
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    I think you've taken a better approach to this last piece, working from big shapes helps keep everything together. It's easier to start from a whole and work in nuances than to start from a scattered board and attempt to connect it all.
    This also applies to that portrait you're working on, try to tie it all together by using or suggesting bigger shapes and planes.

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  23. #45
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    Thanks for the tips and comments!

    A big update just because I found the time and patience to photograph some of my work. Some are old and some are new.

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  24. #46
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    I couldn't sleep so I did a 30 minute screen cap study. I'm not really happy with the end result but I enjoyed the process and I'm glad I drew a lot today .

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  25. #47
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    That's a brilliant study.

    Try to observe more. As they say, "draw what you see, not what you know." In the case of the above, take the pauldrons -- in the reference they're a desaturated brown. In your study you made them more of a bright, clay-brown instead. You painted the skin as orange as well. Try to really look at a reference before you continue. Measure with your eyes, determine what colour they actually are rather than what it appears to be at first sight.

    It can be difficult because colours look different in relation to other, nearby colours. A colour on its own will look different than having the same colour next to other colours, especially depending on what those colours are. Likewise, the lighting will affect what colour appears to be. We might "know" the pauldron is brown, but it'd look different under blue lighting than it would under yellow or green. So forget what you know, and go with what you see, right in front of you, and understand -- why is it that colour?

    Compare constantly. If it doesn't look right, it's because it isn't. Get used to correcting yourself over and over, especially in the beginning stages -- it's always harder and more tedious in the beginning. You'll always have to correct yourself no matter how good you are, but as you get better it'll get easier to get it right. Making corrections will drill it into your head and help you learn more quickly. Although yes, it's tedious as hell.

    In addition, be careful with your strokes. Make every one meaningful. The study looks rather messy.

    One thing that I can say is that the face is really well done. You have a real knack for face, especially the left side of the face, and around the eyes. You nailed his expression, too.

    You're doing really well and I can see a lot of improvement in that study, too. You obviously kept the bigger things in mind here rather than getting bogged down entirely in details, which is brilliant. Keep it up, and I hope to see more soon!

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  27. #48
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    hey dude, sorry for the lapse in communication...life's been reeeeeeeally busy. but i haven't forgotten. hopefully i can make time to do the little demo this coming week.

    keep up the good hard work. you're making progress.

    -A

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  29. #49
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    Thanks, purb36.

    Umbravita - Wow, what a refreshing sight to see that someone posts such a long and meaningful post. I know what you mean about everything and I agree with everything I was just trying to see if I could even pull off something like this as I've never done screencaps before and usually when I'm drawing from life I use charcoal, pen or pencil (mainly pencil).

    Right now I'm working on a small 30x30 oil painting and I'm going to continue doing some screencaps as they are great fun and I feel that they can really help me improve.

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  30. #50
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    hey dude.

    finally did those paintovers i was talking about. basically, if you want something to look real to your eyes, you need to create the same illusions that your eye creates when you look at something. taking your portrait of your girlfriend, for example, you kind of are creating it strand by strand. when we look at someone, however, our eyes don't take in every strand of hair, but they take in the details in the immediate part that we're looking at and then blur everything else together. so the important thing is not getting every single thing in detail, but providing enough details so that something "looks" right to our eyes. also, coloring in by scribbling means that if you want something to look smooth, you need to blend it all in, but blending it destroys the edges that help give things the illusion of form. starting with a mass of a certain color (or value) and then putting in little details at specific spots will keep the illusion of form, and also describe the texture.

    in addition to my paintovers, i included a masterful example of what i'm talking about, a portrait by John S. Sargent. the only thing that's really detailed in the picture is the woman's eyes, nose, and mouth, but it looks really real because of how he manipulates the properties of the eyes.

    please let me know if this makes sense, maybe i haven't explained it well. i hope this helps.

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  32. #51
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    Wow what a great explanation. Thanks!

    I understand what you mean perfectly.

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  33. #52
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    I decided to go back to basics with Loomis - Successful Drawing. I'm starting with perspective.
    It's a lot more reading and understanding then actual drawing but it's amazing how much I learnt in such a short time.











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  34. #53
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    Perspective is always a good idea - you can never do enough perspective studies!

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  36. #54
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    This is my first time learning perspective and it's amazing how much it teaches you.

    Hands, hands and some more hands. Also, I did a metropolitan drawing from imagination using one-point perspective.

    I have loads of time and motivation now but I'm not always sure I'm doing the right thing the right way. Does anyone have some tips on how to learn anatomy & perspective better. I have the books required but do you just read and draw the drawings in the book or what?






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  37. #55
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    Theres a lot of talent in here so far. Good stuff Meteor. I do see a few issues with proportions in your figure studies, I tend to have trouble with that myself. THe best way to learn the human form is to draw from life and also be sure to check out any and all books by Brigeman (sp?), Loomis, and Villpu. They help a lot. Good Luck!!

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  39. #56
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    "I have loads of time and motivation now but I'm not always sure I'm doing the right thing the right way. Does anyone have some tips on how to learn anatomy & perspective better. I have the books required but do you just read and draw the drawings in the book or what?"


    definitely dude. reading and really trying to understand it is the biggest key, the drawings are there to help explain it visually and provide a starting point for drawing the body parts. the next step (and most important) is to draw them from your imagination. it may not be pretty at first, but repetition is the key. so definitely read first, copy second, and then try to draw them without looking at the examples. try to understand and think through what the parts look like from all angles. the more you think as you are drawing, and the more you draw, the easier it will become to remember. understanding these things will help you know what you are looking at (and looking for) when you draw from life, which is also important. drawing from imagination and drawing from life work hand-in-hand, and improvement in one should feed improvement in the other.

    that's a start. i applaud the motivation, dude. good luck.

    -A

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  41. #57
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    You've really improved a lot since your first few posts. Although I did absolutely love your earlier work as well. Keep up the good work .

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  43. #58
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    Ruzkard - thank you!

    Purb36 - thanks for the explanation and great answer.

    Peipei - Thank you!

    Figure drawings from drawingscript.com and a quick drawing of the Marx Brothers. The reference was found in an amazing website I found - http://www.doctormacro.com/Galleries.htm <--- highly recommended.











    Sorry for the terrible pictures I'm not very good with a camera.

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    Good to see you working on the basics =D having a good understanding of the fundamentals is really the key to climb all the levels up to the mastery. Even if it is boring sometimes.
    I would even recommend to you to do exercises like drawing straight lines out of your arms. I know, such stuff soundy awful boring. But I even do it for myself because I suck at straight lines, but we need them for proper perspective drawings, or backgrounds, or many kinds of shapes out there. After lines we can even do maaaany circles, ellipses and later cylinders, cubes etc. Page after page. Believe me, it will pay off. For everything you will draw. Still lives will be easier and figure drawing too. They're the fundamentals you need to construc stuff in the 3D Space. So do some of those drawings every day together with things you enjoy. I'm sure you will improve!
    It's a pity that your pictures are so blurred sometimes, but I think, you made a very good job on the last drawing! Keep it up!

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  46. #60
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    Valyavande - Thank you very much for the advice and kind words

    Quick 30 minute sketch for a small college assignment in concept design.


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