Sketchbook: Pringle Crumbs
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Thread: Pringle Crumbs

  1. #1
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    Pringle Crumbs

    New to ConceptArt.org! I hope to get along with everyone here. Please enjoy my artwork.

    Critiquing is strongly welcomed

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    Nice work and a great start to the sketchbook, I'm sure you'll fit in just fine, upload some more work I'm interested in seeing more!

    My Sketch Book: http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...=1#post3085866

    Please comment+critique
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    Trying out some advice a fellow CA user mentioned to me in a post I made. He said that I should try and learn value from Old Master paintings instead of photographs. So here is the start of my attempt at learning value from Rubens painting of two satyrs!

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    Value studying from master studies? Let me try! Good start man, just keep posting.

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    Did some more on this value practice.

    Hopefully tomorrow I can get my scanner to work and then start scanning my sketches on paper.

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    Getting some what frustrated with this practice. I'm diffidently coming back to it but for now I'm going to work on something else.

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    Hey that's not a bad start. Before laying the thing completely aside, I'd adress at least 2 problems:

    Values: Try to classify your values. Group them and see how different areas receive light, some more or less than others. If you compare the value on the drapery to the value of the torsoe, you'll see that the drapery is a considerably darker half - tone. In your copy, this distinction has not been made. I think at this point, you can go ahead and establish the darkest dark. If the hair on the right is near black, the "distance" in value between the hair and the background shouldn't be as distinct as you have made it. This especially applies to the reflected light on the forehead, which in your painting is nearly the same value as that on the torso.

    General guideline: Values (every note on the canvas) should always be judged in relation to another. Group values to their respective areas. This is a way to establish the large value plan. Give your self one shadow value for ALL the shadow, two half tone values and one light value. When these relationships has been estimated, locate the darkest dark and the lightest light. These accents may reveal some tonal mistakes, so proceed to adjust where nececcary.

    In short: in some areas, where he painted shadows, you painted light (forehead in particular), and in some areas where he painted half tone, you painted light. Being able to better distinguish these tone areas early on, is one of the keys to making a good painting.

    Drawing...one word: Rythm. Bold, italic and underlined for emphasis. Never let this word escape your mind. Look for sweeping lines that run with forms and connect elswhere in the painting. Look for repetition, opposing diagonals, curves. This will help your mind to see how shapes are positioned in relation to each other, and along with being a "compositional" way of seeing things, it gives you a broad wiev of your subject and helps you in accurately positioning what you see on to the paper/canvas/whatever.

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  8. The Following User Says Thank You to AndreasM For This Useful Post:


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    Red face

    Quote Originally Posted by AndreasM View Post
    Hey that's not a bad start. Before laying the thing completely aside, I'd adress at least 2 problems:

    Values: Try to classify your values. Group them and see how different areas receive light, some more or less than others. If you compare the value on the drapery to the value of the torsoe, you'll see that the drapery is a considerably darker half - tone. In your copy, this distinction has not been made. I think at this point, you can go ahead and establish the darkest dark. If the hair on the right is near black, the "distance" in value between the hair and the background shouldn't be as distinct as you have made it. This especially applies to the reflected light on the forehead, which in your painting is nearly the same value as that on the torso.

    General guideline: Values (every note on the canvas) should always be judged in relation to another. Group values to their respective areas. This is a way to establish the large value plan. Give your self one shadow value for ALL the shadow, two half tone values and one light value. When these relationships has been estimated, locate the darkest dark and the lightest light. These accents may reveal some tonal mistakes, so proceed to adjust where nececcary.

    In short: in some areas, where he painted shadows, you painted light (forehead in particular), and in some areas where he painted half tone, you painted light. Being able to better distinguish these tone areas early on, is one of the keys to making a good painting.

    Drawing...one word: Rythm. Bold, italic and underlined for emphasis. Never let this word escape your mind. Look for sweeping lines that run with forms and connect elswhere in the painting. Look for repetition, opposing diagonals, curves. This will help your mind to see how shapes are positioned in relation to each other, and along with being a "compositional" way of seeing things, it gives you a broad wiev of your subject and helps you in accurately positioning what you see on to the paper/canvas/whatever.
    That's a lot of information to take in and is going to take me awhile to digest. Not the brightest artist unfortunately.

    I understand and see some of what you were saying. About how things on my image are lighter then they are on his and vise versa. I don't know how to see if I'm close or not to the image and what I'm doing without eyedropping but I've always been told not to eyedrop because you won't learn as much as much as you would by simply eyeballing it and forcing yourself to see it.

    The second paragraph of describing rythem, I sort of understand what you're trying to explain but I don't fully understand it myself. Most likely because I can't see these brushes strokes and rythem like you do.

    Great advice though, it's just going to take awhile for me to comprehend everything and fully understand what you said. I might have to ask someone to explain some of your wording.

    This certainly will help me. I plan on doing another old master piece once I find my Wacom pen, I've seem to misplaced it in the rush to get out of Delaware.

    Sorry for getting back to you so late. With the hurricane hype on the East Coast in the United States it's taken me some time to get things back and running.

    My Sketchbook!. Please stop by and critique the living hell out of it. All opinions are welcome.
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    Thanks for the huge tips. A lot to take in and fairly confusing but very helpful. The little I understood I can start to see the issues you where talking about.

    Wish I was more fluent in the art world and some of the words you said.

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    This is a small doodle I did earlier, before the helpful information AndreasM talked about.

    I'll redo it and take strong note of what AndreasM said into consideration and see if I can't bring more depth into this. I can see my errors but I still don't have all the knowledge in order to fix them. Time to break out the trail and error.

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    One more I did before the Hurricane hit. Heh.

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    Alright so, good news. Got my scanner working and now I'll start dumping my actual sketchbooks. For now though I'll dump a few things I've done yesterday for practice.

    Might have to edit them to make them smaller, we'll see.

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    I've been trying to do graphite studies of some Old Master paintings and I'm not sure if I'm going about it the correct way. Critiquing would amazing, as always.

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    Scanner giving me a hard time but these are some 30 second figure studies using one of many random pose generators you can find online (forget the name of the one I used in doing these).

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    Some faces I drew while hanging out with a few friends on Skype. Are there any methods to drawing people in constant movement?

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    This was an attempt to try and draw an accurate female form without reference. I still need a lot of practice.

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    TASmith is offline Registered User Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
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    I see talent but you need to give it a big push.

    MOAR FROM OBSERVATION!!!!!

    Draw still lifes. Start in pencil. Move into paint. If you're going to do digital, do studies from observation, either from life or from photos.

    You want to push your imagination which is great, but you need to have a vocabulary and understanding of visual forms first.

    If you really want to develop conceptual ideas, then do some studies of others like Hideyoshi, Gerry Tonga, et alia.

    GO DRAW SON!!!!!!

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