I need help with perspective... (critics please)
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    I need help with perspective... (critics please)

    Hello,
    I'm sorry that my art is still at beginner level. Everyone in these forums is so great, it makes feel uneasy about posting my art here.
    However, I really need to receive critiques to improve my art...

    Both paintings were done in watercolors...


    I have big problems with the perspective. That wooden chair... well, it's just terrible.


    That bridge also doesn't look right. I used a vanishing point and a rule but for some reason it ended up to look wonky. I regret to only use black and yellow on the island, it looks like a monster instead of a city...

    Thanks for looking at my artwork. I'm open to all your advices and on my next work I will keep your comments in my head while painting it.

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    Practice getting a good, even wash with no streaks or backwashes. (Mix more color than you think you'll need; it'll help to not run out.) Try to practice without white, too; using opaque watercolor like you are doing defeats the whole purpose of using watercolor most of the time. Use the paper as white.

    As for perspective... practice the goddam formal perspective with pencil and ruler. There is no other way into it. If you practice it enough, you'll eventually be able to eyeball it. But you must practice with the ruler and learn how it works, first.

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    The bridge looks wrong because the lines that make up the planks are practically parallel to each other instead of converging to the vanishing point. Also, your horizon is tilted in the same pic. Do as arenhaus says, practice perspective.

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    Unfortunately, the only way to understand and get good at perspective is to practice. Fortunately, all perspective is based on the same rules, so once you've gone through a good perspective course or book, and really paid attention, you'll begin to have the tools to map out the perspective in your pieces in pencil before you begin painting. But you really can't just guess - there is a science behind it (so to speak).

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    That science would be physics....as in the laws of...and we all know how ya canna break them right? As Arenhaus said...break out the ruler and work out your perspective first. The top painting also kinda looks like there was no reference...am I right?

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    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    Practice getting a good, even wash with no streaks or backwashes. (Mix more color than you think you'll need; it'll help to not run out.) Try to practice without white, too; using opaque watercolor like you are doing defeats the whole purpose of using watercolor most of the time. Use the paper as white.

    As for perspective... practice the goddam formal perspective with pencil and ruler. There is no other way into it. If you practice it enough, you'll eventually be able to eyeball it. But you must practice with the ruler and learn how it works, first.
    Alright! Thanks for giving me advice on the colors . I will practice perspective before painting more scenery then.

    The bridge looks wrong because the lines that make up the planks are practically parallel to each other instead of converging to the vanishing point. Also, your horizon is tilted in the same pic. Do as arenhaus says, practice perspective.
    I see, I didn't notice the horizon was tilted, how sloppy!

    Unfortunately, the only way to understand and get good at perspective is to practice. Fortunately, all perspective is based on the same rules, so once you've gone through a good perspective course or book, and really paid attention, you'll begin to have the tools to map out the perspective in your pieces in pencil before you begin painting. But you really can't just guess - there is a science behind it (so to speak).
    You're right. I was half-guessing and half using a rule while painting those : < . I'm going to read books and practice until get better at it since I'm planning to paint buildings next.

    That science would be physics....as in the laws of...and we all know how ya canna break them right? As Arenhaus said...break out the ruler and work out your perspective first. The top painting also kinda looks like there was no reference...am I right?
    There was no reference in both paintings... I drew from my imagination...
    Do you think it's better to use a reference? Maybe it will help me to understand the laws of perspective too.

    *
    Thanks everyone for your comments!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikust View Post
    Do you think it's better to use a reference?
    A better question is, should you ever be without reference?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ikust View Post
    There was no reference in both paintings... I drew from my imagination...
    Do you think it's better to use a reference? Maybe it will help me to understand the laws of perspective too.
    A thousand times yes. I said this before, and I think it bears repeating:

    "If you will forgive me for waxing philosophical a bit, it seems to me that the best art flowers when there is a conviction that there is indeed objective reality (however much our own perspectives may shape our access to it) - that we can say real things about the real world, and that there really is such a thing as beauty and integrity that rises above mere sentiment and subjectivity. The artistic vision must submit to truth and beauty - and any pig-headed resistance to this is unmasked as a type of narcissism. Art is indeed an expression of one's self - but it is every bit as much a humble journey of the soul stepping beyond one's self into the real - the true, the good, and the beautiful - and letting openness to that reality change who we are and what we express. In a word, the best art is an act of love - a love that is dedicated to what the subject truly is, and not just the initial impression of it."

    It may sound silly to get so philosophical about something as mundane and common as perspective, but it's quite relevant. It's wonderful that you want to create something that expresses something inside you, but that very much has to be balanced with a desire to get to know reality on a deeper level. To grow as an artist is very often a discipline of deeply and lovingly studying things that we would otherwise overlook. To learn how perspective works, to draw from reference - these are important ways of letting reality break through our mental illusions.

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