CYMK conversion looks fine in photoshop, crap everywhere else

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 86 Times in 67 Posts

    Question CYMK conversion looks fine in photoshop, crap everywhere else

    I have spent the past hour looking up similar topics here on the forums and google and have not found an answer- why is it that a book cover illustration I painted in rgb, then converted to cymk, looks fine as cymk in photoshop but craptacular in every other program and when printed on my printer? By crappy I mean the oranges are too saturated and the image is too dark. Photoshop has it's own color profile I know but how do I get it to look the same throughout? Photoshop is my weapon of choice and if it's not showing me what my client will see and print I need to figure this out.

    If that's not possible, should I just send the high resolution in rgb to my clients and have them convert it? *cringes*

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Artesia, California
    Posts
    112
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    I read that you shouldn't convert RGB colors into CMYK because RGB files are smaller than CMYK and have one less channel. When you convert the files, the computer translates your RGB colors into the closest CMYK colors it can find. RGB mode is for images on the monitor, and CMYK is for images that will be printed.

    I got this information from the DC comics guide to coloring and lettering by Mark Chiarello and Todd Klein.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Ace Corona For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,669 Times in 5,020 Posts
    If you're printing on a home inkjet printer, DON'T convert to CMYK. Home printers are designed to work with RGB files, and will do a much better job with them.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  7. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Washington State, USA
    Posts
    174
    Thanks
    31
    Thanked 86 Times in 67 Posts
    I only printed it to see if what I was seeing in photoshop was accurate (it looked fine in photoshop), and it wasn't- still horrid like the other programs were showing me. I am sending this to a client via e-mail to be printed and I want the file to look right.

    From what I understand it is better to do your own conversion to cmyk Ace, but perhaps I am wrong?

    I am not asking the difference between the two, instead I am asking if there is a way to get all my programs to show my illustration the same way so that my client will see it as I intend. Sounds like no one knows. I guess I will just send it in RGB and hope it comes out well. Thanks anyway!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Artesia, California
    Posts
    112
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    My understanding is that if it is going to be printed, it should be done in CMYK to begin with; you never should've been involved with RGB. Then, there would be no need to convert it. I realize that doesn't help you now with your current project, but keep that in mind for future projects.

    The general rule is: If it is going to be printed, use CMYK, if it will be seen only on the web (on computer monitors) then use RGB.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. #6
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,669 Times in 5,020 Posts
    I think you'll find the consensus isn't anywhere near that universal.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Artesia, California
    Posts
    112
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    I think you'll find the consensus isn't anywhere near that universal.
    I don't claim to know a lot about this, I'm still learning and I got my information out of a book.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    170
    Thanks
    24
    Thanked 102 Times in 54 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Ace Corona View Post
    The general rule is: If it is going to be printed, use CMYK, if it will be seen only on the web (on computer monitors) then use RGB.
    According to what she said, working directly in CMYK will not help her in a future project because:
    Quote Originally Posted by Lithriel View Post
    I painted in rgb, then converted to cymk, looks fine as cymk in photoshop but craptacular in every other program and when printed on my printer?
    That mean the problem is located after conversion and not during conversion:
    RGB painting>>conversion to CMYK=ok>>display on anything else=bad

    As Elwell said there is not any kind of consensus like "if it needs to be printed, work directly in CMYK".
    If you dislike the way your image look after converting it to CMYK, maybe working directly in this mode will help you. But you need to understand that will not make your work better, that will just prevent you from using unprintable colors (well, that will also give you access to some color a normal sRGB monitor could not display but who care since most people will not be able to see them when painting).

    Photoshop is able to use hybrid painting mode which is for me the best solution if you are really disappointed by conversion:
    You work using RGB profile and Photoshop is able to emulate on the fly (and on the user demand) CMYK result so you will know during painting what color will look bad using CMYK. You just need to configure target CMYK profile in color settings and activate it when you need the "proof colors" mode under view menu:

    A little triangle will warn you when using colors out of CMYK gamut:
    Using color picker

    or using color palette (click on it to use the closest CMYK color available)

    But you will still be able to use these out of gamut colors if you consider it is not a problem once printed so you will be able to make the "best" image for monitors and for printers.

    About Lithriel issue now...
    Reading about your issue it seems the problem maybe has to do with a bad monitor profile but that's not sure since you provided not enough information.
    If your monitor profile is inaccurate, Photoshop is unable to display "correctly" your image in RGB and in CMYK. By correctly I mean the real colors and not the colors you think you have used for your painting.

    So, I have few questions:
    -What is your monitor profile? Do you know about it?
    -What color profile are you using in Photoshop? Standard profile like sRGB?
    -If you painted using a laptop screen, you should inform us since a laptop screen gamut can be smaller than a standard sRGB gamut (which could explain also the over-saturated orange if you painted with screen profile instead of standard profile)
    -What are the others programs that are displaying wrong colors? Did you configure them with the same settings you used in Photoshop?
    -What CMYK profile are you using? Other programs displaying horrid colors could be explained by their weak support of CMYK profile or because they are using another CMYK profile and/or another display profile (not every programs are using automatically current operating system color profile for monitor profile and it needs to be set manually).
    For printer printing bad colors, no one can know if you used the right CMYK profile and/or if it comes with such profile.
    -Did you tried printing with RGB profile in Photoshop? I am not sure reading your posts. As Elwell aid, Home printers are designed to use RGB profile and they are sold with color profile using RGB datas and the conversion is done internally so if you convert to CMYK before printing, Photoshop will convert them to RGB again to match printer RGB profile and your printer will convert them back to CMYK internally...from user point of view, there is not any real difference between RGB and CMYK profile concerning colors, all of them are using color gamut information and color gamut can use RGB or CMYK profile. I mean if your printer comes with a specific RGB profile, the RGB profile is describing the right printable colors. There is no need to give a CMYK profile for home users.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lithriel View Post
    From what I understand it is better to do your own conversion to cmyk Ace, but perhaps I am wrong?
    That depends.
    Did you client sent you a specific CMYK profile?
    Converting yourself to CMYK allows you to adjust your image with the CMYK palette (gamut) so you can control the way your image will look after conversion but in some (many?) case, if your client know really how to adjust colors for the target printer, your client will probably do a better job than you.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lithriel View Post
    By crappy I mean the oranges are too saturated and the image is too dark.
    That's normal depending how you are looking your printed image. Monitor brightness needs to be adjusted carefully. Usually when using a calibrator, you can set a "standard" brightness for your monitor that allows to prevent or reduce such differences. If your monitor brightness is too high, it will be equivalent to viewing your printed image under super shining sunlight.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to hecartha For This Useful Post:


Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •