Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast
Results 53 to 65 of 76

Thread: ART - What you're getting into.

  1. #53
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,378
    Thanks
    669
    Thanked 538 Times in 296 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Book Guru View Post
    Anid,

    I hear what you're saying.
    Thinking of it... may be there are too many artists nowadays? The irony of this field is it gets more tough every year yet attracting too many young souls. The market is too narrow, can't fit them all.
    (and thank you for not taking my comment too personally)
    Partly it's what Chris Bennett was speaking of, a diminishing of the market itself. The great days of illustration are indeed over.

    But it is also that the pool of potential artists has broadened. Not only is the field attracting too many young souls, but with the advent of digital media artists from all over the world can compete for any job.

    Of course, this isn't universally true. However the exceptions are few and far between compared to the pool of artists out there.

    As you said, the market is too narrow and cannot fit them all.

    I don't mean to be pessimistic, but rather I'm pointing out a very real problem that most every up and coming commercial artist will face. And each one will have to ask themselves the question that Chris Bennett posed:

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    So what kind of person are you deep, deep down? How important is security, a sense of place in society, a sense of context, a sense of belonging, really, honestly, deep, deep down?
    I chose security. I want my wife and I to have that life depicted by Norman Rockwell, a goal that while seemingly modest is quite the struggle itself. I have contented myself with being a professional amateur.

    My friend, well he's decided to pack for Malaysia so he can compete.
    -My work can be found at my local directory thread.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following User Says Thank You to Anid Maro For This Useful Post:


  4. #54
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    604
    Thanks
    72
    Thanked 108 Times in 104 Posts
    Drawing is just a hobby for me. I have considered getting into some artistic industry like computer game concept art or comics, but now I think I'll probably be too busy with anthropology to become a professional artist of any kind.
    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,999
    Thanks
    2,841
    Thanked 6,099 Times in 2,486 Posts
    I keep hearing this idea that the market for art is shrinking; this is just untrue.
    What is shrinking is people willing to pay for services or pay a fair wage for them. There are now a million free books for kindle; most have art and graphic design for them. How many of them do you think paid for it?

    Special effects and art for TV, movies, cartoons, video games, online social games, massive multiplayer games, ipad games, iphone games, handhelds and all of the product development and advertising that goes with them. Fifteen years ago most of these things were a tenth of what they are now if they even existed at all.

    Luck is what people with limited or no talent and inadequit drive and discipline believe in to help them sleep at night. There is no luck, there is only chance, and as Pasteur said "all things being equal, chance favors the prepared mind."
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to dpaint For This Useful Post:


  7. #56
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    225
    Thanks
    63
    Thanked 90 Times in 58 Posts
    I think it is something of a modern idea or concept that a person today can do a job they love or that's cool. Hundreds of years ago people did not have the luxury of recreational time or the choice what job they wanted to do. Sure, there were some painters, but most, if they were lucky enough to survive that long lived and died farming the land.

    If the harvest was poor, they likely died of starvation. Me, well I'm happy I have the luxury to pursue art in my own time as a hobby. Trying to walk the path of doing it for a living seems an insecure road to travel, particularly if you lack the knack for people and business skills like myself.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #57
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,069
    Thanks
    992
    Thanked 2,174 Times in 754 Posts
    Art ain't easy, but it's not friggin' impossible. I'm making a pretty decent income off of art straight out of college.

    Chris was being realistic with his post. But a lot of people get all doom-and-gloom about the industry because they're shopping around their sub-par portfolio and not getting any work. And the people whose work is high quality but still can't get work are probably just lousy at the non-art aspects of being an artist (business, finance, people skills).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Noah Bradley For This Useful Post:


  10. #58
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,130
    Thanks
    115
    Thanked 690 Times in 417 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Pilcher View Post
    Drawing is just a hobby for me. I have considered getting into some artistic industry like computer game concept art or comics, but now I think I'll probably be too busy with anthropology to become a professional artist of any kind.
    Same with me. My head makes too much noise for me to get particularly good at any one thing: I simply have too many hobbies and I'm not willing to relinquish any of them.

    Now if I could earn some extra cash through my hobby, I guess I wouldn't complain about it, but I'm not convinced I would want to draw eight hours per day, every day.
    Last edited by blogmatix; July 27th, 2011 at 01:27 PM.
    ____________________________________________
    My sketchbook thread:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  11. #59
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    26
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
    I believe this thread has narrowly defined artist. I'd prefer artist to include all creative people who think outside conventionsal lifestyles. Chances are most people went to a public school which kicked all creativity out of them, almost as if the districts want to turn young people into marching sheep.

    Be the person who is able to display their works, and have people ask, "How did you do that?"

    I can't understand how people can claim nobody makes a living as an artist. I personally would prefer to be the 'go to' person when it comes to designing something, even if I've got to hire someone with the skills I don't have.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #60
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,028
    Thanks
    1,349
    Thanked 1,950 Times in 776 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by dpaint View Post
    Special effects and art for TV, movies, cartoons, video games, online social games, massive multiplayer games, ipad games, iphone games, handhelds and all of the product development and advertising that goes with them. Fifteen years ago most of these things were a tenth of what they are now if they even existed at all.
    That's certainly true. Anyone doing images for apps is getting a lot of work right now. A friend of mine who was doing a regular cartoon for Playboy made more with one iPhone game than an entire year with the Playboy gig. Something that was unthinkable even 5 years ago.

    But...
    Most of the new communication technology using imagery is chiefly about cartooning the mass production of icons.
    The special effect stuff in TV, movies, cartoons and video games is where everyone understandably wants to be and anyone starting out should be running in these directions. But they need to be VERY AWARE that mimetic technology programmes will be the way this stuff is produced, increasingly supplanting the traditional mediums.

    People who want to be fine artists - painting pictures to sell on spec through the gallery system have a different problem, but it is none-the-less fundamentally affected by the way our culture relates to images under the leviathan shadow of the developing modern communications technology.
    Last edited by Chris Bennett; July 27th, 2011 at 03:34 PM.
    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to Chris Bennett For This Useful Post:


  14. #61
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,906 Times in 2,547 Posts
    Just a bit of perspective...when I started in games in 1989 we did Road Rash with two artists and two programmers (ok, there were a couple other artists but Arthur Koch and I did 95% of the art). Jungle Strike, EA's first 16meg(abit) cart was three artists...and the team total was maybe 8. In their day those were Halo. So yeah, there are a lot of jobs out there.
    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  16. #62
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    4,999
    Thanks
    2,841
    Thanked 6,099 Times in 2,486 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    People who want to be fine artists - painting pictures to sell on spec through the gallery system have a different problem, but it is none-the-less fundamentally affected by the way our culture relates to images under the leviathan shadow of the developing modern communications technology.
    This part of the art market has a lot of downward pressure right now from two things IMO. First is the economy, the global economy is affecting first tier countries in an adverse way. Living in America, the only place my standard of living will go is down from globalization.

    Second, there are a lot of amateur galleries in business right now. People who have no understanding of what good art is and no business sense. I know a friend who went into a new gallery and six months later the gallery closed because of poor sales. Conversely, the first new gallery I went into the owner told me from the beginning, they could stay open for three years and not ever sell a painting. That didn't happen, but you get the idea. One person was prepared and one wasn't. There are too many of the first kind now going into business. Not just in galleries but every creative venue, games, movies, writing. People with tech, but no knowledge of craft.
    Last edited by dpaint; July 27th, 2011 at 04:57 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. #63
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    2,028
    Thanks
    1,349
    Thanked 1,950 Times in 776 Posts
    dpaint:
    Funnily enough I was delivering paintings to a new gallery this weekend. It was pretty high end with a couple of big time celebrity buyers in the posh part of the city. The owner is a lovely woman, smart, knows her business and loves painting. It was a real pleasure being there.

    Literally one minute's walk away was a newly opened place that had a lot of money behind it but were completely cluleless. The worst thing about it being they simply copied or poached what was selling in the gallery I've just mentioned and stuck it up on their walls with out-and-out dog shit because they couldn't tell the difference.

    The trouble is this gallery is run by media savvy sharks who know all about buying up domain names, marketing, and ripping off the cream from people with greater knowledge about the goods than they have.

    Now, myself and many others try and boycott these places.
    But just think of this:
    The gallery that has just asked me to join them has an average of 3 artists approaching them every single day of the year. Lets say, for argument's sake they take on two new people into their stable each year. That means for every artist they take close on 500 are going to queue up outside the other gallery only too pleased to be the meat sliced up by the butcher.

    Of course my figures are a little guesstimated, but you get the idea.
    Last edited by Chris Bennett; July 27th, 2011 at 04:39 PM.
    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. #64
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,130
    Thanks
    115
    Thanked 690 Times in 417 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    dpaint:
    Funnily enough I was delivering paintings to a new gallery this weekend. It was pretty high end with a couple of big time celebrity buyers in the posh part of the city. The owner is a lovely woman, smart, knows her business and loves painting. It was a real pleasure being there.

    Literally one minute's walk away was a newly opened place that had a lot of money behind it but were completely cluleless. The worst thing about it being they simply copied or poached what was selling in the gallery I've just mentioned and stuck it up on their walls with out-and-out dog shit because they couldn't tell the difference.

    The trouble is this gallery is run by media savvy sharks who know all about buying up domain names, marketing, and ripping off the cream from people with greater knowledge about the goods than they have.

    Now, myself and many others try and boycott these places.
    But just think of this:
    The gallery that has just asked me to join them has an average of 3 artists approaching them every single day of the year. Lets say, for argument's sake they take on two new people into their stable each year. That means for every artist they take close on 500 are going to queue up outside the other gallery only too pleased to be the meat sliced up by the butcher.

    Of course my figures are a little guesstimated, but you get the idea.
    Here in South Africa, this sort of thing happens a lot: the are plenty of art dealers here who do not know the first thing about art, but they check out what seems to be in vogue, then they get up and coming artists to mass produce work in that style. Lots of artists here quickly find themselves in an artistic death trap where they have to produce essentially the same painting over and over.

    Many simply have no choice: if you don't know where your next month's rent is going to come from, and all you have on your CV is that you have spent some years as fine artist (and therefore have no marketable skills of any kind) then what DO you do?

    I have to say though that this happens mostly to artists who have no business being artists in the first place. The only reason their work sells is because in South Africa, public taste in the arts is simple appalling. You will not believe the utter crap that sells here, while highly skilled artists cannot make a living.

    But I'm not sure it is anything new really. It has been this way for centuries, in many societies. The Dutch Golden age produced some of the best artists in history, and LOTS of them couldn't make a living from their art and either lived and died in poverty, or had to do some other job to make a living and paint in their free time. The ones who did make a handsome living through their art were not always necessarily the best ones either. It's one of those things.
    ____________________________________________
    My sketchbook thread:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. #65
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Boston D:
    Posts
    689
    Thanks
    70
    Thanked 218 Times in 149 Posts
    There was once a student of the violin who sought out a master to ask his advice. “O wise teacher,” he said after playing for a bit, “do I have what it takes to be a great violinist?” “No,” responded the master. “Perhaps you would be more suited to a regular career.”

    Crestfallen, the student put away his violin, and turned with a sigh to a career in banking. And ultimately he became a successful and happy banker.

    Many years later he met the master violinist again. The student-turned banker said to him “Because you opened my eyes to my inadequacy as a violinist, I am now wealthy and have a stable career and a good family. It frightens me to think of the life I would have led as a second-rate violinist. Thank you for warning me away from playing the violin.”

    The master violinist smiled sadly at the banker, and replied: “I tell all of the students they are inadequate. It is the ones who choose not to listen to me that have the stubbornness to succeed.”
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  20. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Saraiva For This Useful Post:


Page 5 of 6 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 5 6 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook