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  1. #1
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    My first (ever) Sculpture.

    Hay everyone. This is my first sculpture ever and I am in love. I know it's not perfect but I am pleased with it. I was afraid I would make something crappy and hate sculpting but this has made me want to do this for a living. It is about 50% complete now. I need to form the mouth, teeth, tong, and neck a lot more as well as add the necessary texture still.

    Please give me advice. What do you think could be improved without remaking the whole thing . Thanks everyone for looking at my first ever sculpture. I hope you like it . As you can see, I am excited.


    My first (ever) Sculpture.

    My first (ever) Sculpture.

    Peace,
    Jeff C.
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  3. #2
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    Wow, that looks really good, especially for your first! You must draw or something, to know the human head so well, right? I especially like the way it blends into the base, and the handling of that rather extreme expression. That's pretty bold, and you've got it workin'.

    Only a couple of minor crits I can think of. There should be more forehead to it, and maybe the ear should be pushed slightly down and tilted a bit to follow the pull of the jaw. Keep in mind that they eyes are actually on the center line, so you need to build up the forehead area quite a ways to make it look right.

    ...Are you gonna add hair?

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  4. #3
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    That's great for a first time sculpture. He sort of looks like an enraged Mike Tyson.

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  5. #4
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    Hay, thx for the good crit. About raising the forehead, I agree. I will get this fixed within the next couple of days. I will go to the anatomy books for this one since I got it wrong from memory. And, yes I do draw . Or at least I try. I have taken some life studies classes.

    I do see a kind of Mike Tyson Resemblance... will be fixed with the raising of the skull and forehead.

    This sculpture is based off of a few drawings I had created specifically for this project. There is a front and side view. I am trying to keep to the drawings as much as possible as a test for myself. My drawings are actually a bit wrong in the first place but it is ok. I am learning a ton in both drawing and sculpting because I am now seeing how different my drawings were from each other compared to the sculpture. Man... this is so fun. I feel like a kid in a candy store.

    Specs and tools: The head is about 5.5" height and everything total height is aprox 10.5" height. I am using the Chivant NSP Medium (Bad choice | wish I had chosen the NSP Soft). Using a home made light oven. I have a couple loop tools of various sized that I modified with a dremmel tool for scraping and shaping. And, I borrowed a nice small-spooned shaped metal tool with a nice point at the end of the spoon shape for the mouth and eyes. So far I only have used 3 tools though.

    Anyways, I hope to update it soon so please check back soon. Also, I want to thank John Brown (Gnomon instructor) and Smellybug for all the helpful tips. Definitely helped more than anyone would ever imagine.

    Last edited by jcdied4me; April 28th, 2004 at 07:02 PM.
    Peace,
    Jeff C.
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  6. #5
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    LOL yeah, if you make the brain case bigger, you'll lose the Tyson resemblance!

    I think it takes a really remarkable artist to be able to completely visualize something and draw it, especially from different viewpoints, and then be able to turn it into a sculpture with little or no changes. Smellybug is in that rarified atmosphere. But really. I suspect if you compare the drawing with the finished piece, there are probably a lot of differences. Personally, I like to let things develop as I sculpt... that's one thing sculpture gives you that drawing doesn't... the ability to change proportions and even modify the pose as you go. Well, assuming you're modelling in malleable materials, not carving in stone (and even then, sculptors will generally model a maquette first).

    Oh, I forgot to say this! I wanted tro mention techniques used by Rodin and Michelangelo (maybe you've heard of 'em? ).

    Rodin used to look at the silouette as he developed a sculpt. He'd squint at it against a white wall, just looking at the overall outline, no surface or detail, and then turn it a little and check it again, and keep going all the way around, breaking it down into maybe 16 different angles or so (don't remember exactly), and then he'd do the same thing looking down at it and up. If you just look at the 2 side views, the front and back, and then straight down, you've got a pretty decent start. He said by the time he was through with this, the sculpt was done. He would just make quick changes as he turned it, tweaking with pinches and pokes.

    And Michelangelo used to do the same thing with chisels that he did in his drawings... he'd lay in layers of feathering marks (hatching, or whatever) that ran in the direction of the muscle fibers. I mention this because you're doing the serrated tool scraping stuff, like Smellybug does on his. I used to sit and marvel at those Michelangelo drawings and just try to follow all those little marks... it seems like if you do that on a sculpture you'll almost automatically get a good sense of anatomical form. Of course, the hard part is to first learn how all those muscles run!

    Anyway, looking forward to an update. Great job so far!

    Last edited by Darkstrider; April 29th, 2004 at 04:27 AM.
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  7. #6
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    wow, that is really good! and your first sculpture! great job

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  8. #7
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    Other than the skull thing mentioned above...this rocks!
    You should be very proud, and I would like to see more from you. I myself found that transferring over from drawing to sculpting was pretty smooth, and doubt I'd be half the sculptor I am now without a bit of that as a background. I think mentally it sets you up for sculpting somehow.
    Good work.:thumbsup:

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  9. #8
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    Hay all,

    Thank you all very much for the encouragement and the honest critique’s. I am working on an update that I will post soon. I am having a problem though... I raised the brow... actually the skull a bit and it now looks a lot better, anatomically, however, I had to widen the face a bit to make it look proportional and now... Sigh ... it lost the look of the image I was sculpting off of.

    I am kind of confused... I feel like I should have left it alone now because he looked kew, to me, before even though his anatomy was not correct as it is now (Or closer to it ). I like it both ways but I liked its uniqueness the original way. Should I be frustrated or pleased? Any experience with this? Please tell some stories of experiences that revolve around this subject.

    Peace,
    Jeff C.
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  10. #9
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    I fully understand your frustration....but try not to let it get to you...it won't be the last time trust me. The best thing to do is push through it....look at photos on the net of the head type you're shooting for, and aim for it. Don't give up until it looks how you want it to. Although it can be mentally painful...in the end you and your sculpt will be better for it. It's a neverending learning process...so BIG UP...you'll get it...trust me.:chug:

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  11. #10
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    I agree... you have to make the necessary changes, even though whenever you do, something always suffers. It's always like that.... you go to fix something, and mess up something else. But that's the process of sculpting... it's about learning how to do that and minimize the incidental damage. If you don't make changes because you're afraid you'll mess something up, then you'll never improve as a sculptor. It's called stasis.

    At least you've got pictures of it in that early stage! Believe me, I've been through it quite a few times... reworking something and then realizing it looked better before. So take lots of pictures! What hopefully happens is, as you get better at it, you don't mess it up anymore. And the only way to get there is to mess up dozens (hundreds?) of times. So get started now... mess up lot of stuff!

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  12. #11
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    I've got to add my praise here too.

    You definately know your planes and I love the compression on the nose.

    And I feel your pain too. It's scary to risk losing a sculpt by making changes, but I've also been stuck in the groove of making tiny changes and going in circles because I'm too afraid to do something drastic.

    Don't lose heart - anything you learn here will serve you well on the next piece!

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  13. #12
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    wow, this a great first swing at sculpting, a book that I found most helpful is Eduoard Lanteri's "Modelling and Sculpting the Human figure" Lanteri was a good friend of Rodin and his rendering of fabric among other studies is phenomenal. it will help guide you through some of the issues you have anatomically with the human skull. Good luck and keep sculpting!

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  14. #13
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    Thank you all very much for the encouraging words and helpful advice. Sorry about not posting anything new on this sculpt for a while. I have put the changes into it but have not got around to posting it up. I will have it and another up soon. Thanks again.

    Peace,
    Jeff C.
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