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Thread: Kapri's sketchbook

  1. #40
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  4. #41
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    Keep on an on your proportions, you make some things too big and other things too small. Read up on Loomis' figure drawing book for a good crash course on proportion! Also, keep in mind that proportion is just the relationship between the parts. In your recent study, you made the figure too skinny, and some of the things don't line up. Try to measure angles, look at the negative space and think of the proportions before really setting anything down. http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=14119
    Other than that... keep up the good work! I love the energy in your lines! Try to keep that while improving your sense of proportion and anatomy!
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  6. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Not_Deadman View Post
    Keep on an on your proportions...
    Thx for the feedback man. I have read some parts of the Loomis books. Which one would you recommend regarding proportion? Also, thx for the link to that tut thread.

    Some more fighter gestures done on the road. Used photo ref as a starting point but changed the poses from imagination.
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  8. #43
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    Heya,
    Nice to be able to take a better look at the results of our last sketchtrip. Not Deadman mentioned the proportions and I'll add to that. As far as I know, there are many ways to measure and check proportion. I noticed you did measure up using your pencil last time, but I'm not too familiar with that technique myself. Checking the angularity of body parts can really help, especially in the initial sketch. Checking negative spaces works too. For instance the small window in between the legs of the sitting man (Rubens' St. Rochus+Melaatsen) differs in shape and size in some of the studies. Not sure if it's a good measuring device, but its nice to figure out mistakes. Comparing the 'surface area' of body parts for size differences works too.

    I've noticed it's easy to lose track of proportions when you're too focused on replicating the studied image. Especially a problem if you're getting immersed in details. I usually try to prevent that by taking small breaks and quickly glance back and forth several times between the overall image of your own drawing and the original work. For instance, I too noticed the man's slightly bulging stomach in the original work. Details like these that catch the eye get blown out of proportion easily when you draw them (you mentioned pregnant). I think people tend to draw facial features (eyes, nose, etc) too big for the same reason, and it's a tricky problem. I find that keeping the 'overall shape' in check helps.

    Not sure what they advocate at Wackers'. I personally think that trying many different approaches works best. Same applies to the books; checking out everything ranging from Bridgman and Loomis to Hogarth and Hamm ensures you get different views. They have their own strengths.

    I like those boxers. The easygoing, organic drawings without much too much rigid construction can often end up looking most natural.

    Also- more stuff from imagination!

    Take a look at my Website!
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  10. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthis View Post
    Heya,
    Nice to be able to take a better look at the results of our last sketchtrip. Not Deadman mentioned the proportions and I'll add to that. As far as I know, there are many ways to measure and check proportion. I noticed you did measure up using your pencil last time, but I'm not too familiar with that technique myself. Checking the angularity of body parts can really help, especially in the initial sketch. Checking negative spaces works too. For instance the small window in between the legs of the sitting man (Rubens' St. Rochus+Melaatsen) differs in shape and size in some of the studies. Not sure if it's a good measuring device, but its nice to figure out mistakes. Comparing the 'surface area' of body parts for size differences works too.

    I've noticed it's easy to lose track of proportions when you're too focused on replicating the studied image. Especially a problem if you're getting immersed in details. I usually try to prevent that by taking small breaks and quickly glance back and forth several times between the overall image of your own drawing and the original work. For instance, I too noticed the man's slightly bulging stomach in the original work. Details like these that catch the eye get blown out of proportion easily when you draw them (you mentioned pregnant). I think people tend to draw facial features (eyes, nose, etc) too big for the same reason, and it's a tricky problem. I find that keeping the 'overall shape' in check helps.

    Not sure what they advocate at Wackers'. I personally think that trying many different approaches works best. Same applies to the books; checking out everything ranging from Bridgman and Loomis to Hogarth and Hamm ensures you get different views. They have their own strengths.

    I like those boxers. The easygoing, organic drawings without much too much rigid construction can often end up looking most natural.

    Also- more stuff from imagination!
    Thx for the epic feedback man! Really good stuff you pointed out. The negative shape created by the space between the mans legs is something I never even saw (while I do try to find negative shapes from time to time). But it now sticks out like a sore thumb. I will fix that as soon as I work on the sketch again.

    Getting hung up on the details is something I'm trying to break out of. But I still catch myself diving in too deep too soon sometimes. I guess checking the larger proportions will take a little while before becoming something I do automatically.

    At Wackers I get 7 lessons from one teacher, then 7 lessons from another etc etc. Each one has their own approach: some force you to use a knitting needle for measuring (lol), others forbid the use of any measuring device but the eye. It's a really nice school so far (even if I only go on saturdays).

    I enjoyed the sketchmeet at Rubens. What do you say, do another one in januari?

    For now: after reading the following quote in "Creative perspective for artists and illustrators" I realised I need to study the basic geometric shapes more and more and more and more and more...:

    "We drew boxes each day of class. This went on for six weeks"

    So here's my setup and some results.

    Edit: process in drawing these: drawing the shape from live first. Then I take a photograph which I lay over the sketch to check for errors. After that I do a value study from live > desaturate the photo and check for errors again.
    Last edited by Kapri; December 9th, 2011 at 07:13 AM.
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  12. #45
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    Quick update: Villpu studies and a Rubens sketch.
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    nice studies man keep going
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  15. #47
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    Aragah: thx mate.

    Tonal studies, the plaster cast study isn't really finished yet. It'll stay that way for now.
    Last edited by Kapri; December 11th, 2011 at 04:55 AM. Reason: Spelling
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    Did more geo shape sketches that I won't bore ya'all with. Here are some still life studies done at the academy and a lion attack gesture from photo ref.

    Last one was a "I can haz foodz?" kinda situation.
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  18. #49
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    Thumbnail sketches from imagination. Wanted to create some mages. Will try to do some warriors and creatures too.
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  21. #51
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    I dont know if you know this but the human figure by John H. Vanderpoel and bridgman should help you with anatomy and like they said take life drawing classes that will help you a lot oh and get life drawing in charcoal by douglas graves I got a lot of good info about value and mass
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  22. #52
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    AdrianNagorski: thx mate!
    Udonhead: I've only read Bridgman's "Constructive Anatomy". See page 1 for some Bridgman studies. Also took life drawing classes last year (some results also on page 1). Block 3 of the art class I´m taking will feature life drawing from the model. Never read Vanderpoel but thx for the tip mate.

    More quick sketches from imagination. 2nd image, top left figure has some massive errors (torso is turned way too far) that I've tried to work out on page to it's right. Will do some more studies of the same pose today. Maybe I'll use some photo ref.
    Last edited by Kapri; December 22nd, 2011 at 08:03 AM.
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