do you think wooden pencils can ever be replaced by mechanical

Join 500,000+ artists on ConceptArt.Org.

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    chitown.
    Posts
    381
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 90 Times in 30 Posts

    do you think wooden pencils can ever be replaced by mechanical

    to me it seems like the two are completely different, the skinny mech pencil is used by people who are trying to make things look clean and neat while regular pencils are used for their "weighty lines" and flow of movement
    would one ever achieve the same effect of the other

    speaking of that do thick mechanical pencils (with lead the size of regular pencil's lead) even exist? do you think those can compete with regular pencils since they have similarly sized lead? would thick-lead mech pencils be the death of their wooden counterparts
    y/n
    or would it still be totally different since one is in plastic, and one's in wood

    Last edited by stragan; July 8th, 2011 at 08:23 PM.
    ~*the artistic journey is like giving birth, its gonna hurt and you know you suck but you cant give up because there is no such thing as "giving up" in childbirth*~
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    21
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 10 Times in 8 Posts
    Personally, I like the drafting lead holders.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Leadholder.jpg

    Pros: The lead is about the same size as a wooden pencil, I can get it in varying hardnesses, it can be sharpened to a finer point than a .3 mechanical, I do not have to waste lead trying to remove a wooden casing, I can shade w/ the side of the lead by extending it a bit more, the tip does not break off in my pocket like a wooden pencil does, the lead can be shaped w/ sandpaper, and I can wear the lead down farther than I can a wooden pencil.

    Downside is... well for me, I have not found any unless it's the fact that the sharpener for it is a little larger.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    160
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 63 Times in 47 Posts
    When I want really subtle and smooth shading, I have not found anything that can replace a 3h or 4h wooden Lumograph. It's the near weightlessness of a wooden pencil that I find useful for that kind of shading.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    602
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 94 Times in 76 Posts
    I too find lead holders far superior to wooden pencils. I haven't used a wooden pencil in at least four years. It's easy to switch lead hardness and the lead doesn't snap as you sharpen it like in a wood pencil.

    Wooden pencils always seem to have that malevolent errant splinter when I use them that gouges the paper when I least expect it and I should have plenty of lead before I'm hitting wood.

    This one is the king of drawing instruments!
    http://www.staedtler.com/Mars_techni...ActiveID=33252

    "This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy." -Douglas Adams

    My Sketchbook

    My goal: To get good enough to post in the Finally Finished Forum.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    chitown.
    Posts
    381
    Thanks
    69
    Thanked 90 Times in 30 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dokkalfar View Post
    Personally, I like the drafting lead holders.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Leadholder.jpg

    Pros: The lead is about the same size as a wooden pencil, I can get it in varying hardnesses, it can be sharpened to a finer point than a .3 mechanical, I do not have to waste lead trying to remove a wooden casing, I can shade w/ the side of the lead by extending it a bit more, the tip does not break off in my pocket like a wooden pencil does, the lead can be shaped w/ sandpaper, and I can wear the lead down farther than I can a wooden pencil.

    Downside is... well for me, I have not found any unless it's the fact that the sharpener for it is a little larger.
    lol thats exactly how i pictured thick-lead mechs

    btw if leadholder is really that good, why do people still continue using wooden pencils
    is it just because of tradition?

    i heard wooden pencil gives more control than mech pencils but i personally dont see the difference. maybe i just suck at controlling either hahahaha

    ~*the artistic journey is like giving birth, its gonna hurt and you know you suck but you cant give up because there is no such thing as "giving up" in childbirth*~
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    602
    Thanks
    116
    Thanked 94 Times in 76 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by stragan View Post
    btw if leadholder is really that good, why do people still continue using wooden pencils
    is it just because of tradition?
    I always figured it was price. The initial investment of a lead holder is a big price jump from those super cheap yellow school pencils.

    "This planet has - or rather had - a problem, which was this: most of the people on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small green pieces of paper, which is odd because on the whole it wasn't the small green pieces of paper that were unhappy." -Douglas Adams

    My Sketchbook

    My goal: To get good enough to post in the Finally Finished Forum.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,830
    Thanks
    2,627
    Thanked 1,043 Times in 681 Posts
    As to the OP's thread question.

    No.

    There are leads that are smooth that only work well in wooden design.

    I use lead holders, but there are some pencils that give a smooth glide that kill a lead holder!

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following User Says Thank You to OmenSpirits For This Useful Post:


  10. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    251
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 78 Times in 57 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Dokkalfar View Post
    Personally, I like the drafting lead holders.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Leadholder.jpg


    Downside is... well for me, I have not found any unless it's the fact that the sharpener for it is a little larger.
    just grab one of these http://www.amazon.com/PRO-ART-LEAD-S.../dp/B0027AGG86 Great for the lead holder user on the go.

    My Website I am available for work
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    3,180
    Thanks
    752
    Thanked 2,354 Times in 1,211 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by stragan View Post
    lol thats exactly how i pictured thick-lead mechs

    btw if leadholder is really that good, why do people still continue using wooden pencils
    is it just because of tradition?
    It's probably just that the public doesn't need anything like the leadholder so they're harder to find and harder to buy leads for. Most people use regular mechanical pencils because they don't need to be sharpened. If they use a wooden pencil it's because they bought a pack of 20 for their kid for school or they got a complete set of art pencils or one turned up in the pencil cup at work or something. If they lose it it's not a big deal.

    Otherwise, I don't know about other artists but I find sharpening leadholders a bit of a pain. You end up with a sharpener full of incredibly fine graphite dust which proceeds to escape and get all over everything. I have to keep the sharpener in a plastic baggie if I don't want to carry sandpaper everywhere. Although it's nice to have a dust supply around if you have a sticky lock.

    *** Sketchbook * Landscapes * Portfolio * Store***

    "There are two kinds of students: the self-taught and the hopeless."
    - Dr. Piotr Rudnicki
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Southwestern Pennsylvania
    Posts
    7,134
    Thanks
    8,227
    Thanked 5,581 Times in 1,786 Posts
    I already answered this question when the bastards made me switch from burnt twigs to pencils, but I can't find the thread in the archives. Sorry.

    No position or belief, whether religious, political or social, is valid if one has to lie to support it.--Alj Mary

    Ironically, the concept of SIMPLICITY is most often misunderstood by simple-minded people. --Alj Mary
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    4,543
    Thanks
    2,307
    Thanked 2,122 Times in 871 Posts
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    76
    Thanks
    47
    Thanked 19 Times in 14 Posts
    They're simply two different tools used for different jobs. It's like asking if oil paints would ever replace watercolors. Obviously not.

    That said, They each have their advantages to the right person. Everyone will find their own preferred ways to uses them. I personally like to begin a sketch with a mechanical pencil (HB in most cases). This is so I can keep the pencil moving without having to sharpen, and keep the line weight light and loose. I then switch to softer lead wood pencils (mostly 3b to 5b) then go over my initial sketch for a cleaner line, line weight variety, detail, and shading. During this stage my initial light drawing will nearly disappear only leaving subtle lines which I think adds some character.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #13
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,669 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Some people take lead holders really seriously.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  17. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    1,147
    Thanks
    782
    Thanked 490 Times in 312 Posts
    oooooh... made me think of the old hand drafting days we had to do as part of engineering school. That was my favorite part of engineering too. Then we switched to CAD, and I got into 3D.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,898 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Dude...that link is...AWESOME! Where do you find this stuff?

    The reason I think most artists don't use lead holders is their weight...much heavier than wood pencils.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #16
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,567 Times in 753 Posts
    Nice link Elwell.

    Just a little trick from me. You can even use heavyweight chalk/pastel holder from Koh-I-Noor for square graphite sticks. All you need to do is wrap the stick several times with masking tape where it sticks inside. Holds really strong .



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Farvus For This Useful Post:


  21. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Sussex
    Posts
    2,597
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 1,494 Times in 744 Posts
    Mechanical pencil leads below .7, the graphite is cut with plastic. The marks they make are gray and the feel in your hand is slippery and nasty.

    I'm a big fan of lead holders and woodless pencils. The graphite in these (and in regular pencils) is cut with clay and feels crisp and gritty. Especially on rough newsprint.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    South Africa
    Posts
    1,116
    Thanks
    111
    Thanked 690 Times in 417 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by Stoat View Post
    Mechanical pencil leads below .7, the graphite is cut with plastic. The marks they make are gray and the feel in your hand is slippery and nasty.

    I'm a big fan of lead holders and woodless pencils. The graphite in these (and in regular pencils) is cut with clay and feels crisp and gritty. Especially on rough newsprint.
    It is worth remembering that all those great Renaissance masters basically used "lead holders" to hold their chalk or charcoal or silver wire. It's the wood pencil that is the newfangled gadget. ;-)

    Personally I like mechanical pencil, though for rapid sketches I prefer the broader line you get with a somewhat blunt wooden pencil. Haven't tried lead holders yet. I looked over them in an art supply shop today and very much liked their look and feel, so as soon as my current supply of wooden pencil run out, I'll probably switch to lead holders.

    ____________________________________________
    My sketchbook thread:
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...ight=blogmatix
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Noo Yawk
    Posts
    2,176
    Thanks
    10
    Thanked 776 Times in 461 Posts
    I've varied between mechanical and wooden, but it's mostly a result of my needing to create highly detailed images. Amusingly enough, it was only after I switched back to wooden pencils that I my detail improved. That being said, I generally stay away from graphite sticks nowadays because they're blunted far too easily by my rate of drawing.

    Amateur Artist. Professional Asshole.

    Lookit the Pretty!

    Rule #1 of depicting soldiers: KEEP THE DAMN FINGER OFF THE DAMN TRIGGER.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  24. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    104
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 24 Times in 19 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by GuruGaia View Post
    just grab one of these http://www.amazon.com/PRO-ART-LEAD-S.../dp/B0027AGG86 Great for the lead holder user on the go.
    That sharpener looks awesome. Too bad they don't ship to Canada!


    sketchblog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #21
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    119
    Thanks
    25
    Thanked 53 Times in 32 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by flash jordan View Post
    That sharpener looks awesome. Too bad they don't ship to Canada!
    In case Faber Castell is sold in Canada they sell a similar sharpener for lead holders. The Blade gets dull very quickly but they cost only 0.50 euro a piece here. http://www.londongraphics.co.uk/acat...pener-lead.jpg



    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •