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Thread: The Pre-Raphaelites

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aly Fell View Post
    Oh arse, only two days to go for the exhibition. I won't make it! Oh well, I'll go and drown my sorrows at the Lady Lever Gallery.

    Best gallery I've been to recently was the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge. After visiting the recent exhibition in Dulwich, actually seeing the art on his home turf was illuminating!

    'The Cult of Beauty' was certainly a super exhibition. Quite transporting, seeing such lush paintings and objects all together. One that was there from the Lever Gallery was Lawrence Alma-Tadema's Tepidarium. I'm surprised how tiny it was, (9x13 inches) scarcely bigger than an A4 page of paper.




    Such amazing detail and texture in such a small space. Alma-Thadema also did furniture and jewellery designs, by the way, such as this weird chair which was also there:



    And this bracelet:





    How well the silk folds are done on this one, 'Mother and Child/Cherries' by Lord Leighton, also made me go 'ooh'.



    Awesome how multi-talented many of these 19th century painters were. Leighton was also a decent sculptor. Some of his bronzes were also in the exhibition, including this:


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  3. #32
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    Thanks Folks

    In the dozen days after my post on the pre-Raphaelites, an entire thread of richly tapestried commentary came in. It came in from people at this site, some of whom clearly know much more about the pre-Raphaelites than I do. My post was originally generated by a retired teacher & lecturer who was and is trying to catch-up on many areas of the intellectual and cultural heritage of his European heritage and civilization. The film on that group of artists was just part of my catch-up.

    The ABC1 series in the late afternoon, from 4:30 to 5:00 p.m. from 19 June to 10 July 2011; and Desperate Romantics, a six-part drama, followed on BBC Two in July 2011---I deeply enjoyed partly because of my linkage of the content with history and philosophy, religion and politics in the period. I won't go into detail here for the story of art movements in a wider cultural and intellectual landscape is complex and too much for these little boxes. Belated thanks for your responses folks.-Ron

    Last edited by RonPrice; December 11th, 2011 at 06:10 AM. Reason: to add some words
    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
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  4. #33
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    The writings of John Ruskin were fundamental to the movement and he was their champion as well as their mentor. He was a very gifted artist to boot.

    Despite all the words that have been spilled on this subject, including those of Ruskin himself, the movement is essentially about nostalgia.
    That is; nostalgia for a way of painting, a way of life, a moral code...

    But ultimately it was nostalgia pure and simple, and one that was Victorian in its particulars yet 'English' in its generality.

    Being English, I recognise the DNA inside these paintings making this nostalgia characteristic of this fair isle:

    England is like a walled garden. A sea walled garden. Its climate that of a perpetual misty spring morning. The women daydreamed of are the lavender skinned nymphs who live in the ancient forest. Sunshine; a moment's fulfilment of the yearnings of rainy days. Our fields pock-marked with the standing stones of our ancestors.

    The land of shires and wars elsewhere - its great nostalgic poet; Tolkien, writing The Lord of the Rings during a time when it might all have be taken away forever.

    Last edited by Chris Bennett; December 11th, 2011 at 07:05 AM.
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  5. #34
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    I have a great affection for the PRs (Frampton excepted), and The Nazarenes as well. I also greatly admire Hunt in particular, even though he did create one of the ugliest paintings of the 19th century (The Triumph of the Innocents).

    The documentary linked in a previous post is fairly well done - though why modern film makers insist on not using period music is beyond me. A maddeningly lowbrow practice that alienates knowledgeable viewers without necessarily attracting the serious novice.

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  6. #35
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    correct me if i am terribly wrong but weren't they inspired by carvaggio?

    this is my art history blog: "teenager traversing art history"
    http://teenagertraversingarthistory.blogspot.com/

    ps i know it has a horrible name...any suggestions are welcome!!!
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  7. #36
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    You are terribly corrected...
    No.
    Whether you are forgiven, is another matter.

    From Gegarin's point of view
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