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Thread: Trying to learn color

  1. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by dose View Post
    <nitpick>
    Better to say it would have similar mixing qualities. Colors that appear identical but that are made up of different pigments will likely have different mixing properties.
    </nitpick>
    Point taken. What I was trying to get across is that if you are using paint that looks black, and behaves like black, then you are using black paint, whether that paint has any actual black pigment in it or not. What's even funnier is people who go on and on about never using black, but who happily use colors like payne's gray, which is just black paint with some ultramarine mixed in.

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  4. #41
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    I figured that's what you were going for. It was just worded in a way that could be taken by others to say that colors that appear the same will mix the same, regardless of their pigments, though that's not what you meant.

    Totally hear you on Payne's Gray. I see that one a lot as well- too funny...
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  5. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazymember View Post
    So would this be best for now? I have basically have a zero understanding how color works and how to apply it. I also found this video that seems somewhat applicable. Such as the parts where he matches the tones of the blue with his grayscale guide. (really long video, about half and hour) link
    Welllll...working with just black and white will be about values, which are actually more important than color in establishing a sense of light and form. Of course, this won't help much if you're trying to understand color.

    It just depends on what you're after, though asking these questions I'm guessing you're near the starting point (which is fine btw), so you're probably better off focusing on values right now...and making sure you're drawing skills are high enough to handle painting.
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  7. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by lazymember View Post
    So would this be best for now? I have basically have a zero understanding how color works and how to apply it. I also found this video that seems somewhat applicable. Such as the parts where he matches the tones of the blue with his grayscale guide. (really long video, about half and hour) link
    If you have grasped that value is a dimension of colour, and not something separate from colour, then you have more than zero understanding.

    Far from merely observing and copying, painting in colour involves deciding what hue, value and chroma each component needs to be in order to create the relationships that you want. You learn the essence of this approach by learning to decide what value each component needs to be. And when you are ready to give your components hue and chroma as well as value, make sure you still pay as much attention to the latter dimension as if you were still painting in greyscale colours.
    Last edited by briggsy@ashtons; June 29th, 2011 at 10:57 PM.
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  8. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndreasM View Post
    I have always been sceptical towards the Munsell system, there were tons of great colorists out there before the system was developed. But then again, people learn differently. I guess it's possible to get an "eye" for colour without too much theory, in the same way many people have a great "pitch" for music, and can learn complicated songs without neccesarily learning the notes (many seems to pick up the basic prinsiples by trial and error or by instinct). And then there are many skilled musicians out there who rely on their theory first and their ears second. Just don't put them in a jazz band.
    I'd be more than happy if thinking in terms of the dimensions of colour became as common among painters as being able to read music is among musicians - even jazz musicians!
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