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  1. #1
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    Equivalants to CA for other professions

    I'm curious if there's any. And are there equivalants to books like Loomis' and Bridgman's as well? Like for music/acting/dancing etc?
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  3. #2
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    A great question I've pondered numerous times - mainly because I'd like to see how they (other forums) deal with newbies. I doubt it would be very gentle. I don't know of any and don't really think they exist, like this one at least. I think there are reasons but they're too long to discuss here...more of a beer chat (that's right - you're not quite there yet!).

    As far as books I do think there are some that are like Loomis, Bridgman, etc. for other disciplines like acting, dance, architecture, graphic design, etc...don't know about music.

    Do a bit of research and see what turns up - and post it here.
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    I don't know about websites and forums, but there are plenty of great books for the technical aspects of theater and film, at least. I've only dealt in depth with costuming and stage makeup, but I'm partial to the Rosemary Ingham books (The Costume Technician's Handbook and The Costume Designer's Handbook). Similarly, there are a wealth of books for lighting, set design, etc. I'd be willing to bet there are books covering music and dance, as well.

  5. #4
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    for music it should be something like studying Beethoven, chopin, Vivaldi and all those masters, not sure there is actually some instructional book for music equivalent to Loomis and all that.
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    Yeah, that was my thinking at first - though I bet there are definitely some "classics" for music theory, classical music, maybe even jazz - besides just studying them directly of course.
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    Ultimate Guitar has lessons, chords, tabs, forums, etc. The only downside is there are some ads.
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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by manlybrian View Post
    Ultimate Guitar has lessons, chords, tabs, forums, etc. The only downside is there are some ads.
    For classical guitar there is www.delcamp.us, which is so committed to non-commercialism that they actually block links to any commercial sites.

    There are plenty of instructional books for classical guitar as well, from old classics like the guitar methods of Sor and Aguado, to more modern ones like Solo Guitar Playing by Frederick Noad.

    But these days, in classical music very few people get far if they do not have a teacher.
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    Quote Originally Posted by stabby2486 View Post
    I'm curious if there's any. And are there equivalants to books like Loomis' and Bridgman's as well? Like for music/acting/dancing etc?
    For writing, the Elements of Style.
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  12. #10
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    Animation has The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams as well as Preston Blair's book about cartooning.
    English, as Elwell said, has The Elements of Style.

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    The NaNoWriMo boards are really good to improve your writing if you post in the right sections and ask for honest critiques.

    As for other things, I visit Bhuz for oriental dance and Hoopcity for hooping. Contactjuggling.org is the place to go for, you guessed it, contact juggling. These are all things that many people do for fun, like drawing, but there's heaps of professionals willing to give critiques and help around these places. Don't really know of any books though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ccs View Post
    Animation has The Animator's Survival Kit by Richard Williams as well as Preston Blair's book about cartooning.
    There's also "The Illusion of Life" by Ollie Johnston and Frank Thomas as well as the two-volume series "Drawn to life" by Walt Stenchfield.


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