First Time Reference HELP Plz.

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Thread: First Time Reference HELP Plz.

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    Icon First Time Reference HELP Plz.

    Hi...after getting advice from the very helpful folks here. I started using references to practice DP. And tried this first. I've highlighted some problem areas, it was hard for me to make those wrinkle like shapes of snow in the mountain. Which as you can see are not completed. Don't know, whether it was using the right brush or colors it was just hard. How do you know the right brush to use for painting a particular thing? Need advice...

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    not a bad attempt. for brushes, you cant really go wrong with the hard round. With opacity on you can achieve some really nice bending. Maybe try a chalk brush for textured areas and smaller details. Its all practice really, and 'feel'. that will come over time, and you'll find brushes you really get on with. also, i dont know if you are but try not to colour pick too much when using ref. It's best to try and match the colour with your eye, itll help u loads. hope that helped

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    That helps a bit. Yup, I picked the color from the reference.
    Thanks...

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    Well to get those creases, you need to practice to make it believable. You also need to train your eye to see that those creases are slightly blue and very close in value of the that snow/white color. By the way, try using very desaturated yellow when painting snow. I've learned this from Whit Brachna. Try getting his dvd on painting snow mountain. That's a one crazy tutorial. Also, you can overlay real images of snow to get those tiny, hard to achieve textures.

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    I'd say a big part of the problem is that your just looking at the reference but don't really understand it. The picture flattens everything and you've carried that flatness into your painting. Look at your creases running along the bottom of the mountain where the snowline stops. Everyone of them is nearly the same color. They don't help add depth to your drawing because they just look like lines drawn on top of the snow. Real mountains are (obviously) three dimensional. Each one of those folds your seeing is a crag many meters wide. Push the shadows in those areas to show the form of the mountain instead of just trying to copy where the folds are. Think of sculpting the mountain in paint rather then realistically representing the picture.

    Hope this helps.

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    To piggyback Kafka's comment - I learn a lot from just dragging the eyedropper tool over a painting/photo and analyzing the difference between color. You have been using it, but take a look at how often the value changes, how the base of that mountain is saturated, then it goes gray and then the snow hits.
    Look back and forth between your painting and the photo, and figure out what's missing. You've simplified the mountain, missing all of the beautiful edge detail where the rock comes through the snow again. On the left of the photograph, the rock is more prominent, where you have the snow going past the edge of the painting, which it doesn't do. You have a good start, just keep your eyes open and draw from the photograph, don't slip into memory.

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    Remember, too -- you can paint the blue areas and try to make the edges rough, or you can paint the blue areas and then drag rough white on top of them. Um, if you see what I mean.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    That was very helpful.
    How much time should I practice?
    I did this in 45mins, yeah thats bad. Should have taken more time. The fact that I don't have a tablet is also bad.
    Thanks Guys...

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    You should practice for as many hours as you can every single day. If you put forth complete effort, you will see results. It doesn't matter if you have a tablet or not, you just need to train your eyes to see.

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    On a practical level get the image Dpi up as high as you can get (300 or so) only then can you get the level of fine detail that you are looking for.

    Hope this helps

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    Since you don't have a tablet (I assume you're working with a mouse), it might be a good idea to do some sketching on paper too. You'll be able to move more freely, so you'll be able to do and experiment with more. Experimentation is really important when it comes to grounding yourself, figuring out what works and what doesn't.

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    "I learn a lot from just dragging the eyedropper tool over a painting/photo and analyzing the difference between color. "

    Yes. It gets easier but at first its very hard to figure out the colour of something from looking at it. That sounds daft but its amazing how often say a green thing is infact not green but a sort of dark greyish yellow, for example.. And the way colours work together is hard to fathom; a grey thing next to a blue thing can look pink... And almost evrything is less saturated than you imagine. Eyedropped helps you learn this stuff and after a while you get better at making the colours yourself, although i still use it for particularly tricky ones, or just to confirm i was on the right track...

    "You've simplified the mountain, missing all of the beautiful edge detail where the rock comes through the snow again"

    Yes. Totally agree with Carakhan on these points. the rocks are blued with distance, then theres the boundary with the snow which appears almost pink and borwn but is infact a lovely creamy greyish blueish mixed area of high detail (although Ill warrent theres all sorts of lilacs and purples in there), and then the snow itself which is high grey and very light blue. mm yummy!
    so really youve got two jobs, matching the shape, or type of shape t the transition zone, and the way it behaves colourwise. its a tricky one and worth several attempts!
    Working with a mouse is really hard; its execllent for Lasoo tool but hopeless for sweeping strokes. Buy a wacom, i got one for xmas and its absolutely amazing. totally changed my whole outlook on sketching and studies. love it.

    Last edited by Velocity Kendall; June 10th, 2011 at 12:05 PM.
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  21. #13
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    I don't have enuf money to buy a Wacom, lol. But really, wish there was an institute for concept art in my city with teachers like you guys... YOU GUYS ARE AWESOME...

    Cheer Up! World's a big place...
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  22. #14
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    i have this one. £34.99 so about 60 bucks US. its wicked!

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/Wacom-CTL-460-...nputDevices_RL

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