good tutorials/reading on light and shadow?
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    good tutorials/reading on light and shadow?

    trying to get my rendering from pure values up but i cant think of too many sources other than the whole general art book tutorials that only have heres a cube a circle and a cone exercise.

    or is that truly all there is too it and from this point i should just do more real world practice? and if so whats good real world things to practice?

    trying to really get my fundamentals up

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    Andrew Loomis' "Successful Drawing" and "Creative Illustration". No better resource on the fundamentals of tone and value that I've found. Free PDFs here:

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/10338/Andr...essful-Drawing

    http://www.scribd.com/doc/2244752/An...e-Illustration

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    excellent my good sir thank you very much.

    heres a sample of my right now skill level..
    i feel like i have an ok understanding of it but it takes me too long when doing digital paintings of having to "think" about it rather than understanding and just doing.

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    successful drawing is a beast of a book...
    its one of the best drawing books ive seen even but its like.. damn where does it end. practice practice practice.

    guess i better get to work.

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    here's some info very similar to what we went over in the drawing class: http://www.artinstructionblog.com/dr...ight-and-shade

    To put it in practice we had to set up couple still ives with neutral colored objects (mostly black, off white and white) point a spotlight at them, and then do graphite drawings... using light logic and observation.

    This is one of the class drawing we had to do, 10x12 graphite pencil, all strokes and crosshatching, building up the values, no rubbing and smudging.
    Still life was eggs, ribbons, some torn paper, arranged n a cardboard box, with a 75-95W desk lamp pointing at it. About 30 hours of crosshatching.



    And a photo I took of the still life, after the drawing was finished....
    Anyway, that's the kind of stuff we were doing to start learning how to see and draw light.

    Last edited by Conniekat8; February 26th, 2012 at 06:13 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by battlebattle View Post
    successful drawing is a beast of a book...
    its one of the best drawing books ive seen even but its like.. damn where does it end. practice practice practice.

    guess i better get to work.
    Yeah, but the sections on light and tone are nothing major. Give it a read though, it's great info. The chapter "Tone" in Creative Illustration is just as good and a bit meatier.

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    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
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    Quote Originally Posted by battlebattle View Post
    or is that truly all there is too it and from this point i should just do more real world practice? and if so whats good real world things to practice?
    Yep.

    Simple, solid, hard-edged shapes like Connie shared. Neutral colors and flat/matte surfaces are very helpful when studying value. Skulls make excellent subjects of course. I like to pick up cheap home decor or child's toys at the thrift stores and paint them flat white for both myself and students to use. I'll post some in a bit...

    Here's a sampling of the kinds of things I'm talking about:

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    Last edited by JeffX99; June 6th, 2011 at 07:45 PM.
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    Yes, what Jeff said!
    Our drawing teacher said we can pick up a lot of objects from around the house, or outside, spray paint them flat white, or semi-gloss or sateen black.

    He said fir the first semester, till we get the basics down to stay away from intense colors or a lot of texture, because they become more difficult to interpret.... and he wants us to get the basics down on simpler objects first.

    As time goes on and our observational and drawing skills grow, we increase the complexity, number, texture and coloring of the objects.

    Last edited by Conniekat8; June 7th, 2011 at 02:51 AM.
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    thank you guys excellent links and advise.
    i will practice for the next.. 6 or so hours

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    William L. Maughan's "Drawing The Head" taught me a lot about how light and shadow work. The biggest thing I remember is that cast shadows have hard edges and form shadows have soft edges. That was a big turning point in my drawing once I understood it.

    My Sketchbook

    And then God said, "Let us make man in our likeness and our image. Let us make him ridiculously hard to draw so that poor artists everywhere will have to spend 10,000+ hours failing repeatedly before they can begin to capture the form and likeness onto a two-dimensional surface." And there was man. And it was good. And artists everywhere lost their minds.
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    anybody got any ideas about learning digitally?

    its weird, on paper i can do light and shadow a little easier without having to think about it because i know the pencil so well.. even though im no master im 10 times better on paper.

    anybody know any methods of practice i can do digitally? id like to get better at my digital while i learn light and shadow.

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    Digital is just a tool, once you understand the fundamentals it is no big deal to do the same things digitally, just a matter of learning the software. If you don't know the fundamentals then you're just adding a layer of difficulty trying to learn them digitally.

    Edit: I would recommend you get a sketchbook started, we have no idea what your current level is.

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    i think this came out pretty well.. ive never tried to push it with textures and stuff because the basic light shadow never looked ok enough where i though finish details would help it.

    i did the apple in like 40 minutes but i did the lemon in like 15..

    just using all the stuff i learned from the apple i was able to render it to texture ready level in like 3 minutes.

    but this was a rare case.. im going to try it again with something else.

    hm.


    (edit) what the hell man.. i did the peach in like 15 minutes..
    im impressing myself, yesterday i couldnt even render a damn egg and that peach almost looks real..

    should i be trying something harder? or one from imagination? i dont know how to tell if i "got" it?
    im not used to anything but being frustrated.. this is very weird being 100% honest.


    double(edit)
    i did this one from memory/imagination?
    i tried drawing the peach again and it took about 15 minutes and it still looks ok. i think im going to try something harder.

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    Last edited by battlebattle; June 8th, 2011 at 03:51 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Conniekat8 View Post

    And a photo I took of the still life, after the drawing was finished....
    Anyway, that's the kind of stuff we were doing to start learning how to see and draw light.
    Oh wow, do you mind if I use that photo as a reference for my own study? It is exactly what I have been looking for.

    Also, OP, have this: http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/light.htm

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    Quote Originally Posted by cannibalcarnivale View Post
    Oh wow, do you mind if I use that photo as a reference for my own study? It is exactly what I have been looking for.

    Also, OP, have this: http://www.itchy-animation.co.uk/light.htm
    Go for it
    The teacher had us set up the still life, if you are interested in setting up your own, I'll describe the details and parameters he gave us

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    The teacher had us set up the still life, if you are interested in setting up your own, I'll describe the details and parameters he gave us
    I'd appreciate if you did I gotta start to work from life, too, and any piece of advice helps..

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    ok, here are the details og the project:
    - Find a large shoe box, or an office file box, with a lid. (Lid is important for putting it away when not drawing)
    - Cut two sides open so they fold open flat.
    - You can line interior with white or off white paper, or leave it raw cardboard... this can be changed as needed, to work as a background for your composition.
    - Desk or clip lamp with an ‘old style’ milky white incandescent light bulb. At least 60Watts, I prefer around 100W.
    - Industrial strength glue, usually silicone or ‘tough as nails’ from hardware stores, to glue the pieces to the box.
    - Smooth, cold press white Bristol board (like Strathmore Bristol 500) or equivalent, and graphite pencils. 2H, H, HB, and B… maybe 4B for deeper darks, if needed…. If you are going to do graphite pencil piece. About 18x26, with format area not smaller then 8x10.

    Items to start drawing:
    - Black satin ribbons of various widths 0.5"-3". (from craft or sewing stores). Satin usually has a nice range of values/sheen on it. Make sure the surface is smooth (rather then having lot of relief or color embroidery on it)
    - one or two hollowed out eggs, or other simple curvy shapes. If they are in color, spray paint them white. They can also be spray painted black with satin paint, or of flat you can use some baby oil or hand cream or similar to give it a bit more sheen. Flat black doesn't give you a whole lot to draw, on a value scale, it needs a bit of reflection.
    - 2-3 sheets of black and white construction paper. (usually you tear it up in some sort of interesting shape to use in composition, and to experiment with lighting.)

    Notes: First couple of pieces, the teacher wanted us to draw larger then life, with relatively simple shapes, to get used to seeing and hatching in the values. Then you can complicate things and introduce other objects from there.

    Setup:
    -Set the box on a desk in front of you, just beyond your drawing board. Set up a desk lamp over the still life to get interesting single point light source. If you are getting too much light from the rest of the room lighting, you can use box lid or something else to shield it. To start with you want pretty decent contrast between lights and darks… till your skills get more refined.

    -Draw a few thumbnail sketches looking at your still life from different points of view before deciding on the composition.
    - Use your composition thumbnail to center the piece on paper and determine final size. We were supposed to draw eggs about 1.5x larger then life… egg being about 2”-3” wide.
    - Make a light HB pencil under drawing from observation (after you centered everything on the page)
    - Start shading using light pencil strokes, if doing pencil work, and layer the values.
    - We also did couple value scales on the side of the same paper, as a warm-up.

    The whole project, with pencil can take between 20-50 hours… or more with an extra large drawing area.

    Here are a few pics:

    1. Box, unfolded open with still life glued inside.
    2. Value scales (bad oblique photo of them, but they give you a rough idea what I mean by ‘value scale’. each square is at least 1”x1”
    3. Thumbnail sketch example - the whole sketch is about 5 min, and not bigger then about 3”x3” give or take. We did 3-4 of those from different POV’s before deciding on a final.
    4. Closeup from my drawing, where you can still (kind of ) see pencil strokes, rather then soft blending.

    Last edited by Conniekat8; February 26th, 2012 at 06:13 PM.
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    I think my post didn't register... *bump* ???

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    Great job Connie! I'll be interested to see if anyone follows through...

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    what do you guys think?
    i thought the ceramic holder thing would make it harder and the metal too.

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    Not bad - your elipses need quite a bit of work though. Also post it a bit smaller so we can see it without scrolling.

    Not sure what the partial elipse is moving out of shadow around the bottom of the egg?

    Nice observation of the cracked shell and interior color though.

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