Posting up some more of my work
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    Posting up some more of my work

    Hello all,

    Aside from my pic of chun-li, I haven't utilized this forum very much. So, I decided to post some of the drawings I've been doing on my 18x24 sketchpad (mainly to see if I'm off in the right direction).

    First two pictures I was just trying to get the angle of the cube right. I know I messed up on the second cube with the top right corner. As well, the shading is poor.


    The hand is from one of those wooden models and is the latest thing I've done. I added two pictures, one is as closeup as I can get it for the filesize.

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    Yeah, I guess I'm not improving very much. Still not comfortable drawing this way.

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    You're headed in the right direction...but fergod'sake you don't have a board behind your pad? Gotta have a firm surface to work against. Also break into some charcoal, much faster values and lay-in. Of course charcoal gets messy just looking at it...so if you're doing this in the house...well...don't. Good job on the hand mannequin though. Just keep it up!

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    I think you should try out some charcoal. I think you just need to push your values much more. And I think your line hatching needs to be tighter so there's more consistent value. Try to really observe your subject. You are at the point where you should start adding light and shadow to your drawing, don't be afraid to fall on your face many times doing so.

    Just dive in and try to capture what you see in terms of value and shape.

    edit: dammit Jeff, way to get to the charcoal suggestion before me!

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    Only critique I can come up with right now is: Don't scribble your shading like that.

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    @Jeff - I'm using some sort of mini-easel. It's actually sitting on a TV tray to get it up higher. It works reasonably well, except like you mentioned, there's no support for the sides. I try to turn it into a positive though - it helps me keep my strokes light, at least. I've looked at some stores and online, but nothing seems to be much better (and portable).

    @DeadlyHazard - I'll have to dive into it I suppose with charcoal. Though, I'm really self-concious about my line quality, and I don't want to try and "hide" any of my mistakes. I still can't make sketches with that "sketch" quality - it's like what you see in the examples I posted, pretty dull. Should I be trying to work faster?

    @Kweckduck - Yeah, I know. I was doing it just to bring some contrast in the picture. I was focusing mainly on the fingers and lines.

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    Hi matey

    I like the hand studies, they are coming on nicely.

    But I have issues with your reflection on the table, or shadow on the table and because I'm not jeffx99 who is years ahead of me I have re-created the scene in a 3d package to show you how the reflection should look and where a ahadow would be if you need one. In the one you did the perspective seemed off and the reflection seemed curved, sorry about that.

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    there are two things to ask now No1. does this help you out or shall I go and sit in a corner and sulk!
    No 2. this looks like a really interesting study would you mind if I had a crack at it too? just for my sketch book thingy.

    I hope this is useful to you, all the best

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    @Lightship - The model does help out, thank you. I'll observe it better for the next time.

    Go for it if you want to. It's a styrofoam cube on a table.

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    i dont get exaclty why the "cast shadow" is being treated as a cast light.

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    I think you should stay away from shading all together right now and just focus on line quality and structure. Also, I am not quite sure why you feel so compelled to use an easel to sketch on, especially for the subject matter you are drawing. It's all personal preference of course, so it's not right or wrong, just saying it's an odd choice. I think doing some really simple perspective exercises for one and two point perspective would help you a lot too, as the cubes drawings are very off as other have mentioned. Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avvatar View Post
    I think you should stay away from shading all together right now and just focus on line quality and structure. Also, I am not quite sure why you feel so compelled to use an easel to sketch on, especially for the subject matter you are drawing. It's all personal preference of course, so it's not right or wrong, just saying it's an odd choice. I think doing some really simple perspective exercises for one and two point perspective would help you a lot too, as the cubes drawings are very off as other have mentioned. Good luck.
    I work from an easel because I hear from people that drawing large is a good way to get better. So, that's why I do it.

    Yeah, the cubes are skewed now that I look at them (I swear they look better on the paper I drew them on). Oh well.

    I agree that I do need to work on line quality - that's currently top priority for me, at the moment.

    Thanks for stopping by.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bullitbikini View Post
    i dont get exaclty why the "cast shadow" is being treated as a cast light.
    Reflection in the tabletop I believe...I think he forgot or just didn't put it in the cast shadow.

    Mathew - gotta get a board behind that pad though. Any home improvement type store has masonite usually already cut up into 18x24 panels - or will cut one for you. Equipmnt really is a big part of being able to do this stuff right - you don't want to be fighting wonky setups at the same time you're trying to concentrate on drawing.

    There are plenty of much better alternatives that are very portable - I would get a half french easel, or a full size is fine too - just clunkier.

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    I have one of those masonite type material portable drawing boards with the clips built in.. so I can draw in my lap, outside propped against a tree or if I go to a room with an easel, I can use it as a sturdy prop for my drawing pad. They're not so expensive. A big piece of straight up masonite is probably cheaper and you can use like... gigantic staples clips to clip things to it.

    Mine has reference clipped to the top for whatever project... or comic scripts etc.

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    I feel like you are worrying too much about what other people do. There is no secret formula to drawing that will make you amazing. It all depends on the person. Have you ever just tried sketching on a desk? It works pretty well. Also, drawing large is a lot more time consuming then small, and right now since you have to learn the basics, it might be counter-productive. As for the cubes, they aren't just skewed, the vanishing points are all over the place. Even if it looks better in person, they are still off. That is why I suggest looking into some perspective tutorials.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avvatar View Post
    I feel like you are worrying too much about what other people do. There is no secret formula to drawing that will make you amazing. It all depends on the person. Have you ever just tried sketching on a desk? It works pretty well. Also, drawing large is a lot more time consuming then small, and right now since you have to learn the basics, it might be counter-productive. As for the cubes, they aren't just skewed, the vanishing points are all over the place. Even if it looks better in person, they are still off. That is why I suggest looking into some perspective tutorials.
    No formula? I thought it was dedication, hardwork, with a side of funk. Not to mention I'm using "Pro Fast" pencils...

    Anyways, I do have a drawing table I use, so that's my sit-down work area. It's the fact that I used to draw with only my wrist, with it resting on the pad, that I believe is the problem. So, I'm still feeling the effects of trying to correct having that crutch. It's difficult for me.

    Do you have any exercises for me that would be a good start for either perspective or line-work?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Avvatar View Post
    I feel like you are worrying too much about what other people do. There is no secret formula to drawing that will make you amazing. It all depends on the person. Have you ever just tried sketching on a desk? It works pretty well. Also, drawing large is a lot more time consuming then small, and right now since you have to learn the basics, it might be counter-productive. As for the cubes, they aren't just skewed, the vanishing points are all over the place. Even if it looks better in person, they are still off. That is why I suggest looking into some perspective tutorials.
    You're right about there being no secret formula - but there is really only one approach to learning to draw well that has been proven out over time: drawing from life at an easel. If it worked better other ways that is what we would be doing.
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    I agree Mathew should study some perspective theory as well - but he's just getting started so plenty of time...there's a lifetime of learning ahead.

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    Well, I don't think it necessarily has to be an easel as long as you have something that works like one
    ex: one of these things
    or those desks that you can adjust the height and tilt of.
    I even prop up my sketchbook on my legs if I'm working in a small sketchbook (but maybe that's bad so don't listen to me on that one)
    So just figure out what works best for you and keep up the life drawing.

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    Yeah - that's a drawing mule or horse - they work great but lower your pov and make it hard to step back from your work. Also not very portable. The most versatile piece of equipment you can invest in is the French Easel - haul it anywhere, draw or paint, set to any height, etc.

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    We use mules in life drawing classes throughout the school year, and they can be set on the short end, and a board placed on top to support a larger pad of paper. This allows you to stand while working, which can be very nice for gestures, but still leaves the field of view open. Adding a little ledge to the long side helps, of course.

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    I guess I just like them because I like to sit and draw rather than stand, but you're right it's not something you can take anywhere. Both have their own uses I suppose.

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    Hoping these are better than the ones I posted before.

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    Those structures look isometric instead of being drawn with some handle on perspective.

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    Four squares isn't enough to do you a lot of good. What you should do is pick an arbitrary point on the page and use that as your vanishing point, then try to fill up the page with boxes. It'll get you used to eyeballing in perspective. Maybe pick more than one spot off the page and do two-point that way, just as an ongoing exercise. Heck, just take regular sketchbook pages and do it as doodling while you're doing other stuff, it's good foundation work.

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    I'm angry at how this turned out, but I'll post it anyway.

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    Right idea but make that excercise look good. Even with a simple excercise you should strive to make it look sweet. Use a ruler...keep things parallel and perpendicular...emphasize the box lines, especially the closest ones...lighten the lines to the VP...make the VP one actual point and make sure every line goes to it.

    Perspective is very precise and should be reflected in your excercise. Yes I know one can understand the principle and not execute a precise technical drawing, but, people expect very accurate, clean execution of perspective studies. Just not the type of thing to be sloppy with. So yeah, do some more and tighten them up...

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    Thanks Jeff - I didn't use a ruler because I figured it would be good practice for control. You can see I tried to ink in the boxes to bold them, but that didn't go so well. It looks terrible, I know.

    I'll definitely do it again with a ruler, but my table easel moves around if I put too much pressure on it. I had to put my knee up there on the base to try to hold it down . I need to buy one of those french easels (which I'm planning on doing).

    In the meantime I did buy a mirror, and I drew a bit of myself with it.

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    Is it just me or do you draw everything with outline only? You seem to do this in your sketchbook too (like yeah, there's one or two pics of Loomis head practice but otherwise you don't seem to construct your drawings from shapes).
    Don't try to concentrate on the line and shape at the same time, try constructing your drawing from shapes before adding the final outline with ink or something.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    Don't try to concentrate on the line and shape at the same time, try constructing your drawing from shapes before adding the final outline with ink or something.
    I find this SO hard. I picked up Loomis for the first time a year ago and I am studying quite a lot of Hogarth at the moment- and I always always ALWAYS find myself trying to copy the outlines of Hogarth's illustrations. Yeah I know, cylinders and tubes and boxes and so forth- but when I just sit down and start, it's all line and outline again.

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    In your last perspective drawing the box in the upper left and the box lower right look really good, Mathew!

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    Hey Mathew - glad you're stepping up to the French Easel. You don't need to work at the easel for things like these box perspective excercises - just work at a table on regular printer paper - you can crank through a ton of them and get experimental with shapes. Working at the easel is mainly just for observational drawing.

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