I have problems with taking criticism.

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    I have problems with taking criticism.

    As a artist, I love my work. Even if one of the piece is crap. I love it.

    If someone gives me a negative comment, I am more likely to tear somebody's face apart rather than ignoring or listening to their words.
    My work is very personal to me. Few things hit my red buttom harder than a insult to my work.

    I don't want to name examples in my life. I know I have this problem and really have to deal with it to be a profressional artist. Or just an artist in the real world. Like AA, the first step is to admit I have a problem.

    This is what I'm struggling with. This is more of a rant than anything else.
    Thanks for reading.

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    Try not to think of it as insults to your work but as a way to get better. They comment your work because you have potential and youre good enough for them to see how you can improove.
    Just think about it. Nothing in this world is perfect. Perfection does not exist, but it's a consept we humans like to stribe for. Even the most beautiful painting out there has its flaws, I'm sure of that. There will always be someone better than you and there will always be something to learn, but you can get far on that road none the less. You wont learn anything if you don't listen to people.

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    It's not you

    Hello

    Not an uncommon problem at all, I've come across numerous artist's during ages past schooling and professional work who suffer from high degrees of this affliction.
    Here you are unable to divorce yourself from your work, any attack (as percieved by you)on it is a personal attack on you. You are going to need to learn to view your art as simply art when being reviewed. As if you were looking at the work of any artist, the art is not you or your's. Of course this is easier said than done, but it is something you'll need to deal with if art is to be your profession. Why you may ask, because the vast majority of these people I've dealt with in the past disappear rather quickly. Not the type most others care to be near to or to work with.

    Mr. D

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  7. #4
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    Mr. D is right about the "emotional detachment" you need to learn and develop. Which doesn't mean you should care less of your art or have less pride for it, but see that it too can have flaws and you shouldn't allow those flaws to be there if you can fix them. It can be easier if you do art that you don't pour your soul into, something that personal work can be, but choose a more non-personal image to do (like... a square box or something) and ask critiques for that, and think "if I love my work, I want it to be the best I can do and also be good for others to look at".

    If someone gives me a negative comment, I am more likely to tear somebody's face apart rather than ignoring or listening to their words.
    That's why internet is such a good thing. You can't tear someone's face and you don't really have to take it all at once, but take your time, chill out, read it again, see if there's anything that makes sense, chill out bit more, look at your art, the crit, and see if there's a point somewhere that you can use.

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    If you're doing this for personal enjoyment keep it for personal enjoyment.

    If you're trying to improve and you know people need to see your work to give you tips, you have to learn to cope with it.

    If you're trying to do this as a profession, you're definitely going to need to learn how to cope with it.

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    I'm all about taking criticism, but I've been out landscaping all week, and I would happily punch in the face any of the wankers who come up - unsolicited - and comment on my painting. did I ask you to look? did I ask you to speak your mind? if you sit with a laptop writing in a café, do I lean over your shoulder and say 'you're no Shakespeare'?
    Luckily I'm too concentrated on my work to actually react, but it's like bloody mosquitoes buzzing in your ears.

    </end rant>

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    It's important to be able to distinguish between criticism and people just giving you shit. The internet is a mixed bag that way which is why conceptart is a great place for an objective opinion.

    Ask yourself, what flaws are they pointing out? Is it something conceptual? The lighting? The choice of colors? Or are they just saying they don't like it without any substantial explanation?

    Also, where are you getting these criticisms from? Other artists? A teacher? Or just some jackass you know who likes the sound of his own voice?

    Personally, I need objective criticism, or I would never excel. But I don't attach a lot of emotion to the actual process- just the concepts behind them. Maybe try to detach the two in your mind.

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    You say you love even the crap pieces - that means you own that they have flaws. If it's crap what would you better next time? Critique yourself as if you'd never seen the work and then think if some of the words given to you were justified or not. Suck it up, move on and listen to that little voice in your head when you know they were right.

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    It's something every creative person has to come to terms with, writer, musician, dancer, artist. Like Mr. D said you have to detach your ego from your work. Critique is about the work - not about you. Maybe this will help: On Critique.

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    Never show your work in public.

    Keep it in a shrine in your house. This is said with NO sarcasm.

    Producing something of a creative nature, by most ideas, are made for the public consumption, and if we've learned anything about the public, they are VERY fickle.

    If this is your passion, own it. No unwritten rule says you have to share it with anyone beyond who you wish.

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
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  20. #11
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    Well, ultimately you're on your own anyway. It's not like you can go running to the Internet or the art director every single time you have an assignment, it would take too long. If there isn't an inner voice that's picking your art apart mercilessly you're going to have to develop one and listen to it. It's not about listening or not listening to other people, it's not about your feelings, it's about not accepting crap.

    You need standards and you need to live up to them. If you love everything you do then what incentive do you have to get any better? You can just poop out shit all day and be deliriously happy. It's when you step back and start saying "this is not good enough, I will not accept this," that's when you can start moving forward.

    I think once you get over that hump it's a lot easier to listen to other people.

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    My husband calls this "chronic turd polishing". It's so much more freeing when you can just look at said "turds" and realize that no matter how much polish and shine they have, they're still just turds.

    I'm still working on this myself.

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    critic

    Quote Originally Posted by ronin356 View Post
    As a artist, I love my work. Even if one of the piece is crap. I love it.

    If someone gives me a negative comment, I am more likely to tear somebody's face apart rather than ignoring or listening to their words.
    My work is very personal to me. Few things hit my red buttom harder than a insult to my work.

    I don't want to name examples in my life. I know I have this problem and really have to deal with it to be a profressional artist. Or just an artist in the real world. Like AA, the first step is to admit I have a problem.

    This is what I'm struggling with. This is more of a rant than anything else.
    Thanks for reading.
    its the only way to improve here , we all believe that our creations are good, but this impression only belongs to the artist, for myself, gives me an aggressive feeling the next one will be on, not to mention theres a lot of talent here such as Jeff ,Dpaint my favourites

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    It's also important to be able to develop the ability to self-critique. At times you can be the most truthful critic of your work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Noah Bradley View Post
    At times you can be the most truthful critic of your work.
    You can also be the most unreasonably ruthless and vicious though. You made it, you can see all the flaws. Doesn't mean that somebody else can't genuinely think it's a cool image that they'd like to have. And it totally matches their new cushions.
    I've never had a crit on this site that came close to the shredding I've done myself when the thing was finished. (which only reinforces your point etc..)

    I've almost talked someone out of giving me money for stuff.


    /2p worth

    Last edited by Flake; May 21st, 2011 at 12:11 AM.
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  28. #16
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    Critique yourself, don't rip yourself a new one.

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    Noah, I can't help it.

    I want to be good. ( giant EEEGGOOO!!!)
    I figure if you want to be good the target should be high

    Halfway to Whistler is still further than all the way to Kinkade..

    Last edited by Flake; May 20th, 2011 at 09:05 AM. Reason: Typo
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  32. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flake View Post
    Halfway to Whistler is still further than all the way to Kinkade..
    If we measure that in Liefeld units, how much is it? 1000?

    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

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  34. #19
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    OMG NO! Don't start in with Liefeld Units...then you have to get into negative integers and shit. Next thing you know someone will develop a scale and kev and bcarman are going to get involved!

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  36. #20
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    Accepting criticism is part of growing up. You want your id, ego, and superego (concepts of a personality) to be in harmony, or else you will take a toll on your mental health. It seems your superego is undersized, or else you would take criticisms more easily. Chances are, you don't criticize yourself or punish yourself too much, and that is why you love every art you make (you are spoiled). And so the only time you can be criticized is from an external source, which you are not used to. Learn to criticize yourself more and be more readily to accept another's criticism.

    Last edited by Vay; May 20th, 2011 at 02:33 AM.
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  37. #21
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    Taking criticism is just like any other sacrifice, though, isn't it? You want to feel lovely about your work, but you want to get better at this stuff even more. So you take your lumps and learn from it. It's a lot like the sacrifices you make to learn on your own, really.

    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

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  39. #22
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    This is how I look at it:

    The mind set to have is.. People critique your work because: They care for your improvement.

    People give critique because:
    - They want to help you.
    - They want an ego boost of showing you how much they know.
    - They get an ego boost by being mean to people.

    It's easy to tell which one's who:

    If they want to help you: you'll see that they actually make an effort of explaining to you what they mean. And won't leave you with something really confusing. If it makes sense to you, take it in. It will make you a better artist. Be happy that there are people that actually wants to help you and really shows that they want you to understand their point of view.

    Ego boost of showing you how much they know: They critique every tiny little thing and leaves it with comments like "the face is weird" instead of actually giving you an idea of why it isn't looking right. This is because they don't know why anything is wrong because they don't have the knowledge to tell you. They just critiqued for the sake of critiquing. This is actually worse than the mean people because they leave you in confusion. And if you listen to them, they can sometimes give you bad critique that you start to follow. It's just to take it with a grain of salt and look at the comment objectively: "Did I get anything out of this comment? No? Then say thanks and move on." I usually comment back: "I don't really know what you're trying to say.. but thanks nontheless" that way you're not being rude but you're also showing them that they need to be more clear.

    The mean: This is the easiest to realize who they are. They give you comments like: lol that sucks. Or: lol wtf is this. or whatever. I never comment back to people like this. On places like DA it's just to hide the comment if it bothers you and if they keep coming back, it's just to block them. On CA, they aren't people like that, they'd get banned. It's just to bite the lemon and realize that there are idiots in this world.

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  41. #23
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    Criticism is something that makes you think twice, being too proud makes you blind to your mistakes. Accepting critics are part of understanding reality, because there's more than you to this world, because everything has it flaws and can always get better. Perfection isn't fully reachable, even if you can get very close.

    If you want to improve, accept critics. If you don't want to, then do whatever u want.
    Of course, you can always criticize yourself, but you are after all only one person and most likely, you see things only from your own perspective, it will only take you as far as you can go as a single human being.

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  43. #24
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    I agree with what others have said about critique being useful for learning and that most people who critique you want to help.

    I will also point out that if you want to be a professional you will be making alot of your art for the consumption of other people. That is just the unfortunate truth. Now where you work will affect how much of their ideas and opinions must be reflected in your art. I am not a pro but my impression is that in fields say animation and advertising you have less to say over subject matter and design than say an independent artist who sells at galleries. But even the independent artist needs to understand what is appealing to others, even on a compositional level in order to be successful. If your stuff is crap, who's going to buy it? (okay okay, there are people who will buy anything based solely on criteria like "oh it's blue! I must have it" or "oh a dragon! I love dragons" but this is a small group of people.)

    So as a professional not only is criticism important for self improvement and goals, but it will be important for your job. Your career opportunities will be greatly decreased if you cannot listen to people and either conform to or compromise with their suggestions.

    and actually this last bit is applicable to many careers, really.

    Last edited by wooden mango; May 20th, 2011 at 02:38 PM.
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    Here's something I don't understand:

    how can one not see what is good and or bad about its own drawing OR, at the very least, be aware of what he likes or doesn't like about it?

    I don't understand the OP. Any critic someone makes either falls in one of those categories:

    1) You knew about the flaw and so he isn't teaching you anything. No emotional reaction there.

    2) You didn't see the flaw and now realize that that's something you've got to work on. ("Oh shit, I didn't see that but he's right!").

    3) He's saying something that makes no sense at all and all you can think of is "Jesus this guy doesn't know what he's talking about."

    I don't get it. Where's the part where you go "How dare you tell me the hands look messed up! YOUR FACE IS MESSED UP!"
    Whatever you draw either looks right or doesn't and you know it right away.

    I'm not saying you're gonna know what is it that's off in your drawing, but you're gonna know right away something's off.

    Unless we're talking about more subjective criticism such as "I don't like that you used brown in your painting" or "Space marine just ain't my thing". But even then I don't know how you could get mad at that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TheCoconutChef View Post
    Here's something I don't understand:

    how can one not see what is good and or bad about its own drawing
    I've found that through my improvement, I see more and more mistakes in my old work as well as more and more mistakes in work done by others... professionals... even some masters(!).

    Your eye becomes more attuned as you gain more skills and understanding. So it is pretty understandable that when you're starting out you just might not know what is wrong with your drawing, if anything.

    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

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    There's criticism and criticism.

    When your client tells you how your work needs to change to fit his requirements, that's not criticism. It could be a great drawing, but not fill the assignment. That's just business.

    When your art teacher or your peers critique your work...eh, well. That's what you're paying for. When you ask someone what they think, expect to get an answer.

    Like the OP, though, I can't stand drive-by critique. Fair, unfair...whatever. Don't care. If I didn't ask for your opinion, getting your opinion anyway activates the HULK SMASH lobe of my brain.

    How many people would walk up to a stranger and say, "MAN, that's an unflattering jacket on you"?

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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  49. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwarrior View Post
    This is the part where many can get offended. At least for me it is... because "flaw" is subjective (unless you know exactly what the artist's intent is...
    Flaws are not subjective if the"intent" is some level of representational "realism". In cases where style dominates there is little one can critique.

    Quote Originally Posted by zwarrior View Post
    But I get stand offish when someone says the color choices I picked are wrong just because they would have done it different. In those cases I don't care for their bias, its my work not theirs...
    Again color is rarely "wrong" unless one is going for some level of realism or accurate light...I don't think most people offer critique just because they would have done something differently.

    And as always, critique is there to take or leave...and as Omen pointed out early on, don't seek critique of your work if you're not ready for it.

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    What's your intent with your art? If you want to be a professional illustrator, guess what - you need your work critiqued hard. You don't want "sugar coated" - you want the meat of what sucks about your work. Or at least, that's what I'd want. You can't make a living with art if you suck at it. (Take the sculpture of the Pope done by that Modernist sculptor - the people HATE it, think it's ugly, and they say it doesn't look like their beloved Pope AT ALL. A likeness is definitely important in some places)

    Last edited by hitnrun; May 21st, 2011 at 10:03 PM.
    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
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    Quote Originally Posted by zwarrior View Post
    This is the part where many can get offended. At least for me it is... because "flaw" is subjective (unless you know exactly what the artist's intent is, and no one knows that better than the artist themselves). A lot of people mock the idea of someone saying "that's just my style" or "you just don't understand", but some times that is the case, what one person sees as a flaw may not be so in the eye of the artist. That's what I dislike about critiques at times, it's someone's opinion with a dogmatic pretense to it.

    I'll admit I had some cases where I did get a critique and thought they were right, but that's on mostly obvious mistakes like a leg was too short when I didn't mean to make it so, or something like that. But I get stand offish when someone says the color choices I picked are wrong just because they would have done it different. In those cases I don't care for their bias, its my work not theirs...
    Just because something is subjective doesn't mean it isn't worth considering. If you receive a critique that is like that check out the other artist's work (if you can) or if it's a vague comment like "I don't like the colour" ask someone to elaborate. Maybe they think it's contrary to the mood of the piece. Maybe they find a certain area of colour distracting. These are important aspects of your design. Then consider their ideas in relation to your work, what you intended and so forth. I would even say that for some of these more subjective critiques you should it give it a try. I mean, what harm could it do? You might actually like the results. And if you don't then don't do it again. Experimentation in art is probably just as important as taking criticism.

    Also, there is no shame in listening to the advice of others. As someone else above said, as an individual we can only see the world from one perspective and different perspectives give you a more rounded view of what's going on.

    Last edited by wooden mango; May 22nd, 2011 at 10:01 AM.
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