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Thread: Post your Palette!

  1. #31
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    @Jeff - Haha, yes! I actually studied very briefly with Faragasso here in NYC. Wonderful person- I wish I could have studied with him longer. This is essentially the same palette he teaches, though he usually teaches a limited version geared specifically towards portraits. He told me once that for more complicated pictures he would mix up several extra strings like this.

    @Gwenevere - yes, it sure is organized. Believe it or not, I'm actually not a very organized person. Nobody believes me but it's true. It's just that I realized years ago that if I wanted certain results in a painting I would have to get organized or it just wouldn't happen. So, I learned to turn the organized on when necessary.

    Also- once the palette is set up I actually find it quite intuitive. I stop thinking about all the numbers and rows and columns and instead it just becomes physical. Need to go lighter? Move to the right. Darker? Move left. Warmer? Move up. Cooler? Move down. Too chromatic? Add gray from the top of the column. Actually, the only time I have to stop and think is when I want to mix complements together instead of using gray to modify chroma. I have to do a bit of calculus of what color I'll end up with.

    The good part is that all the strings are in a sealable box, which has some cotton squares in the lid where I put a few drops of clove oil at the end of each session. This keeps the paint from drying out, which means next time I want to paint I just pop the lid off and I'm ready to go. The down side is that if you leave the paint in the clove oil fumes too long it can affect the drying time of the paint on the canvas.

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  3. #32
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    Dose, I've heard about using the clove oil. I just put my opened paints in the freezer. So, you just put a dab on the cotton and duct-tape the cotton to the top (I have the same air-tight box). How long do the paints last before a skin appears on it?

    Dougie

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  4. #33
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    Dose - Awesome!

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  5. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Hoppes View Post
    Dose, I've heard about using the clove oil. I just put my opened paints in the freezer. So, you just put a dab on the cotton and duct-tape the cotton to the top (I have the same air-tight box). How long do the paints last before a skin appears on it?
    At the end of each painting session I just put a drop or two of clove oil on each cotton square. If there's a pigment that dries out quickly (i.e. umber) I might add an extra drop or two on the square that will end up closest. The cotton squares are just duct-taped up there.

    I use the freezer as well. Actually, in general I prefer the freezer to the clove oil, mainly because if you leave the paints sealed in with the clove oil fumes for too long (say, 2 weeks), it will affect the drying time of the paints. I had one painting take 3 weeks to dry to the touch. This isn't a problem if you open the box before too long.

    I like the freezer because it's not modifying the paint (much, at least). The downside is that you have to wait for the paints to thaw to a workable consistency. With the clove oil you just pop the top off and go, and you can leave it right in your studio instead of digging it out from the freezer. These days I only get a few short painting sessions a week (sometimes maybe 20-30 minutes), and I want to make sure I have as few excuses to avoid it as possible, and that I spend as much time as possible painting and as little time as possible setting up/cleaning up.

    So, these days it's the clove oil for me.

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  6. #35
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    I'm Impressed

    Quote Originally Posted by dose View Post
    As mentioned in another thread, I am a bit of a palette mad scientist. I really enjoy experimenting with different palettes, from the very simple & limited to the very complex. Here are some photos of my latest madness. It's a Reilly-on-steroids palette, with a gray string + 7 high-chroma strings. Each string has 9 steps in it (numbered 1-9, with 0 as black and 10 as white).

    I pre-mix the strings and tube them up in syringes, which I keep in pegboard next to my easel (pictured).

    Pigment key for palette:

    IB: Ivory Black
    W: White (currently Permalba, but switching back to lead for drying time)
    RU: Raw Umber
    BU: Burnt Umber
    BS: Burnt Sienna
    AC: Alizarin Crimson Permanent (currently using Winsor & Newton- PR177)
    UB: Ultramarine Blue
    PT: Phthalo Turquoise
    PGY: Phthalo Green, Yellow Shade (currently Gamblin Phthalo Emerald)
    CYL: Cadmium Yellow Light
    CO: Cadmium Orange
    CRL: Cadmium Red Light

    Aside from the yellow string, all the higher values are mixed up with white from the pigment furthest to the right (i.e. for orange it's mixed up from Burnt Umber to Cadmium Orange, then from Cadmium Orange up to white. For Alizarin Crimson it's mixed straight from Alizarin up to white.)

    Normally I would add a black in the 0 column, but the particular image I'm working on doesn't get much lower than value 1 so I'm leaving it off.

    Note: values of pigments vary from brand to brand, and even batch to batch within brand, so don't take these values as universal.
    brilliant

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  7. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by RangerX View Post
    brilliant
    Wish I could take credit- 99.99% of the credit for that one goes to Frank Reilly.

    But thanks!

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