Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 17
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,035
    Thanks
    2,167
    Thanked 3,347 Times in 1,123 Posts

    Jason Rainville's Portfolio Review

    I'm Jason, 25 years old and failing at freelancing essentially. Right now I'm working with a few small tabletop RPG publishers. While I've seen some improvement over the years I feel that there are some crucial things I might be missing. I've got some more specific info down below, but generally I just want to get better overall. if you want to skip reading all the crap below and just critique that's fine

    Where I want to be:
    Freelancing, creating covers or interior art for fantasy novels, rpg book etc. While concept art/video game art in general doesn't interest me as much, I'd very much consider working for video game publishers. I want to work mainly with characters, with environment and creature art in a secondary role.

    Pin-up art would probably be the dream. If I could paint goddesses, super heroines, mythical femme-beings etc. I'd be happy. More erotic/pornographic images however I'm not into; tasteful nudes only.

    More specifically in the short term I'd like to get in with Paizo/WOTC (which I've done some small work for in the past but through a failed artists studio headed by a guy who's paid none of us, the cocksucker).


    Where I think I could be going wrong;

    I don't want to taint any critiques but there are a few things that have been troubling me;

    - My rendering usually feels plastic. Adding more texture/softening certain things makes it look unfinished, while rendering everything out makes it look even more plastic.
    - Composition confounds me
    - When I try to make things more dynamic with dramatic lighting and louder colours most images end up feeling tacky, but understating it makes it feel dull. i might be having some problems with contrast.
    - lately I've noticed a trend in my work where things get too soft and mushy. I think I've gone back to softer brushes after things felt too harsh and specific.

    lastly; paintovers, no matter how quick or dirty are always appreciated. thanks in advance for any crits, here's some more recent/best work;

    ---------------------------------

    Name:  ITCOM_2.jpg
Views: 1655
Size:  326.1 KB Name:  DarkPathCover2.jpg
Views: 1585
Size:  327.8 KB

    Name:  catagasin9.jpg
Views: 1592
Size:  140.7 KB Name:  sirensnew2saq.jpg
Views: 2520
Size:  101.6 KB

    (study)

    Name:  ps7b.jpg
Views: 1652
Size:  97.3 KB

    Name:  valev.jpg
Views: 1620
Size:  181.3 KB

    Name:  warrior2.jpg
Views: 0
Size:  308.9 KB Name:  0813_aquila.jpg
Views: 1572
Size:  260.1 KB

    Name:  0606.jpg
Views: 1569
Size:  302.9 KB Name:  0704_Aquarius.jpg
Views: 1568
Size:  317.5 KB

    Name:  dwarves2.jpg
Views: 1571
Size:  131.6 KB Name:  orc2.jpg
Views: 1615
Size:  213.3 KB

    Name:  harpy3.jpg
Views: 1598
Size:  112.7 KB

      Similar Threads
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    1st pic: This is a little bit too blurry overall. My main issue with it however is the guy in the front--his anatomy is very off and his head is much cartoonier/unrealistically proportioned than the rest of the figures in the composition. I also find all of the characters in the image are very stiffly posed.

    2nd pic: The background is overly blurred, and looks especially odd with the spiderwebs on it since they are so much sharper and look very out of place for how far in the background they are. The lamp post in the foreground is far too prominent and is honestly where my eye keeps looking. Why is it so large and bright, and why did you put so much detail on the leaves next to it?

    3rd pic: This one is quite good. I would only watch out with the far hand of the man who is being punched--once again this is an area with too much attention when not necessary. The gun by the hand might also be repositioned as its position in space looks rather awkward next to the cat woman's head.

    4th pic: I like this one a lot--very nice colours and lighting. A few areas of pure black or just a very very dark value in key places would help create that extra bit of punch. Also the rocks appear a bit plastic, so some more texture and some stress crack lines in them would make them more "rocky".

    5th pic: Great study! Not much to crit here...maybe the soft brush used on the hair looks a bit odd when it goes beyond the hair like that, but really it is a strong painting.

    6th: Anatomy on this is very good. The skin tones bother me however. She is very red coloured, yet is in a blue environment. Her skin tones should be dependent upon the surroundings. I can see you tried putting in some of the blue into the shadows, but it would also influence the stuff in the light (because if the light was red, the surroundings would be too). The clouds can also be made to look more like clouds as they appear rather solid at the moment.

    7th: Possibly my favourite of the bunch. This is very good, only thing I see is that the red flowers are a bit too strong and saturated. But everything else is great--the rock, skin tones, and drapery and all very believable.

    8th: Honestly this doesn't make much sense. Why are there a bunch of green goats? If she is in a cave, where is all the light coming from? She is also in an extremely awkward pose, and her legs/pelvis are anatomically off. The foreground isn't making much sense either with the purple flowers creating a rift in the image and being very out of place colours wise.

    9th: There is too much fighting for attention here--the figure, the white of the waves, the flowers, the orange at the bottom etc. The top half of the picture looks like it is from a different painting than the bottom half.

    10th: This looks pretty good. Not much to crit here...

    11th: The first thing I notice is the texture is very distracting and I would get rid of it, or find a way to make it look more natural and like sand. At the moment it honestly is not good at all. The rest of the painting is nice however. A few anatomy issues like short arms and a very thick waist. But the cool shadows against the warm light works well. I would tone down the metal belt buckle as it draws too much attention to itself.

    12th: This looks very good. Grab some ref for the wings and feathered legs, as well as the feet. They are all a bit too cartoony, and don't meet the same quality with which you have painted the torso. Her arms also can be reworked a bit as they don't recede back in space very well.



    All in all, a very good portfolio Jason. Keep on with your hard work!

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Andrew Sonea For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    asdfl;

    Last edited by Andrew Sonea; April 17th, 2011 at 02:29 PM.
    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    asdfsadf

    Last edited by Andrew Sonea; April 17th, 2011 at 02:29 PM.
    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    asdfsadf

    Last edited by Andrew Sonea; April 17th, 2011 at 02:30 PM.
    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,035
    Thanks
    2,167
    Thanked 3,347 Times in 1,123 Posts
    4 crits for the price of one!

    EDIT: and big thanks. Agreed with all of it. So essentially main problems would be improper focus, some anatomy/colour constancy issues and things being too blurred in areas?

    And for the lady with the goats.... boy it was a weird one. The brief is that she's Capricorn, the mistress of like 40 mountain goats (the males being dark green) who resides in a seaside cave. In the cave is a large garden/forest which grows from the light emanating from within the cave, which is apparently equivalent to normal sunlight.

    Last edited by Jason Rainville; April 17th, 2011 at 02:19 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    Oops, wow I didn't mean to post four times haha. It wasn't posting properly, nto sure if it my internet or what.

    But yeah those are the main things. You mentioned also that you found you were painting too plasticy, and not good with texture. I wasn't bothered by it looking too plastic, but if you are perhaps you should do some texture studies. Practice using textured brushes, phototexture overlays etc. You may want to look at Brad Rigney (Cryptcrawler). His stuff used to be super plastic looking, but now he is using texture very well. You can maybe try to analyze how he made the transition, what types of thigns he was doing, and how he is using the textures.

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to Andrew Sonea For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,035
    Thanks
    2,167
    Thanked 3,347 Times in 1,123 Posts
    I actually have cryptcrawler's video, Only saw it halfway through once though. I'll def take another look

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    1,882
    Thanks
    1,455
    Thanked 1,439 Times in 748 Posts
    I've never seen his video unfortunately...but just looking at his art you can see an improvement in texture:
    http://cryptcrawler.deviantart.com/a...2F4278841&qo=7
    http://cryptcrawler.deviantart.com/a...2F4278841&qo=0

    Also I guess just study artists who use texture a lot and still make it look finished. There are a ton of them, but off the top of my head here are a couple:
    http://maciejkuciara.com/
    http://www.komarckart.com/index.html
    http://www.goodbrush.com/
    http://matejapetkovic.cgsociety.org/gallery/

    Website
    Sketchbook
    Blog

    "Complacency is the womb of mediocrity. " -- Jason Manley

    "If you always put limits on everything you do, physical or anything else, it will spread into your work and into your life. There are no limits. There are only plateaus, and you must not stay there, you must go beyond them." -- Bruce Lee
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Andrew Sonea For This Useful Post:


  14. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Posts
    2,069
    Thanks
    992
    Thanked 2,174 Times in 754 Posts
    I don't think rendering is your issue--in fact, I'd say that part is easily professional enough to be getting work from the companies you're aiming at. I'd say if anything you're falling short in the gesture and costuming departments. The gestures feel stiff overall, and the costumes are quite a bit too plain. Check out the art that Wizards commissions--often it's very highly detailed with a lot of nick-nacks in the design.

    Really solid work, all in all. Keep at it!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to Noah Bradley For This Useful Post:


  16. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    France !
    Posts
    1,473
    Thanks
    707
    Thanked 527 Times in 473 Posts
    Hi jason ! I second noah bradley for the rendering stuff, i don't think it comes from it ! All i see is some anatomy issues, the more you'll understand anatomy better, the more you'll be able to render them better ! So keep it up, don't give up, and you'll be successful !


    contact: kikindaface.art at gmail.com

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to kikindaface For This Useful Post:


  18. #12
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Austin
    Posts
    868
    Thanks
    610
    Thanked 567 Times in 343 Posts
    So, I think you're aware that there are a few anatomy and design slip-ups here and there, alongside some general stiffness, but I really don't think that's what is completely holding you up.

    I think you have an identity crisis.

    First, you want to work in probably the most competitive genres of illustration. Needless to say you are walking on a very well trodden path. In front of you are some very skilled and highly talented people, who already have a track record for success. Not to say you aren't skilled or capable, but what is your game plan to compete with people like Algen, Jana, and Rapoza (Just to name a few community examples.)?

    Sure, eventually you will raise your ability level to muster, but what then? What is it about your depiction of an orc that will set it apart from the 10,000 others we have all seen? Why is your image not a disposable one? How can I spot a Jason Rainville in a sea of well established archetypes and cliches? What makes you unique? How do you stand out?

    These, I think, are more important questions in the long run.
    Best of luck.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to {CKL} For This Useful Post:


  20. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    6,035
    Thanks
    2,167
    Thanked 3,347 Times in 1,123 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by CKLamb View Post
    So, I think you're aware that there are a few anatomy and design slip-ups here and there, alongside some general stiffness, but I really don't think that's what is completely holding you up.

    I think you have an identity crisis.

    First, you want to work in probably the most competitive genres of illustration. Needless to say you are walking on a very well trodden path. In front of you are some very skilled and highly talented people, who already have a track record for success. Not to say you aren't skilled or capable, but what is your game plan to compete with people like Algen, Jana, and Rapoza (Just to name a few community examples.)?

    Sure, eventually you will raise your ability level to muster, but what then? What is it about your depiction of an orc that will set it apart from the 10,000 others we have all seen? Why is your image not a disposable one? How can I spot a Jason Rainville in a sea of well established archetypes and cliches? What makes you unique? How do you stand out?

    These, I think, are more important questions in the long run.
    Best of luck.

    I'd thank you ten times for that if I could, I think that hit to one of the big issues I've been neglecting.

    First with an "excuse" for the orc and some of the other images; most of these were paid work for clients that wanted classic monster/character archetypes depicted in a standard, cliched way (despite the fact that they're all small publishers directly competing with WOTC.... sounds familiar to my situation ). I wanted to give those dwarves a heavily persian influence, but the client was clear that they were to be "normal"

    Aside from some of that, I've never put any thought into what "style" I was using, and often I find myself conflicted over whether I should throw realistic lighting situations out the door and go for all sunset/high contrast lighting or whether I should tone everything down with normal sunny days or overcast skies. Subtlety or drama. then i don't know whether to bullshit a bunch of tiny unrealistic details on equipment and clothing, or go for more simple realistic accouterments. THEN on top of that the quality of my work is just plain inconsistent.

    I really don't want to take on something gimmicky just so I can differentiate myself. I've never even dabbled in lined art, exaggerated proportions or highly graphic images. I just don't really know where to go

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook