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  1. #40
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    Forget drawing pretty girls & concentrate on structure.

    The features are the icing on the structure cake.

    I'm pretty sure there's a tutorial here somewhere called "Drawing Heads" so if you search that you should find enough info to keep you going for months.

    Sydney artist Luke Marcatili

    "Fear is the mindkiller..."
    - The Litany Against Fear
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  3. #41
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    Smile Dont hate it, intergrate it.

    So why, WHY would the lowly pencil (which is so archaic and not worthy of a second of attention from such an evolved being such as yourself) be a superior implement of learning?! It's staggeringly simple;

    No bells and whistles.

    Pencil marks aren't permanent, but sometimes they are a bitch to erase. You can only rework your image so much before the marks are ingrained or the paper falls apart. Photoshop by contrast allows you to ENDLESSLY erase, paint over, resize and move any and all elements of an image. you can eventually match up your frankenstein of a drawing to your reference just by trial and error, which won't teach you a damn thing. Simply put, and if you read anything I've typed here read this, but since I'm being a meanie head and likely to be ignored I'll have it at a font size that will catch the eye;

    A pencil forces you to observe thoughtfully, place your strokes carefully, and learn quickly

    So, before you say "no u dunt understaaaaaand" check the first few pages of my sketchbook. Most if not all the early drawing studies are done in pencil. You are me from the summer of 2006. You can choose to continue struggling with half-assed likenesses done digitally on a slippery tablet that you're not used to, or you can do what I did, discard the tech that you're nowhere near ready to use properly, clutch the graphite that countless others have, and start really drawing.
    Very True Jason.
    Its interesting looking at JR's posted examples how much he's acheived not just technically but also emotionally as well.

    Ive often wondered if there is an unseen "energy of the artist" that is somehow channelled and infused through traditional mediums but blocked/diminished when filtered through electronic methods of application? hmmm
    I am in no way condemming the digitial format, (Im trying to learn it myself) but a common objection from critics of digitally made art, is its' cold and sterile and artists who've solely honed their artistic skills through this format never seemed to (completely)grasp the technical correctness or ability to convey a unique 'gestalt' to their work that traditional artists do.
    The merits of efficiency, economy, colour vibrancy and array of visual effects cannot be denied using digital methods however the mind-eye-hand-to surface connection seems to be be far more prominent and unified with the traditional methods of creating art.
    The truth is every artist benefits through "cross pollenization" from other methods, mediums and styles that seem irrelevant(?)or unrelated to their own.

    back to the thread topic: DaEvil1 have you tried the good old tip of turning your reference picture upside down? This often repeated bit of advice from one artist to another will retrain your mind (and eye) to simply draw the lines and shapes its looking at not what you mind 'thinks' its sees. You'll be surprised in the level of accuracy of your work using this method.

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  4. #42
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    Well I for one am taking the criticism that DaEvil isn't taking and using it. I, too, have been pretty ignorant and stubborn with my tablet, but I think this thread has inspired me to go back to pencil, however much hesitation I may have for it.

    Thanks guys

    Edit: just realized this is a very old thread, and did not mean to bump it. Sorry guys

    Last edited by mRomano; August 12th, 2012 at 07:12 PM.
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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagoelius View Post
    I am in no way condemming the digitial format, (Im trying to learn it myself) but a common objection from critics of digitally made art, is its' cold and sterile and artists who've solely honed their artistic skills through this format never seemed to (completely)grasp the technical correctness or ability to convey a unique 'gestalt' to their work that traditional artists do.
    I'd say that is mostly due to the lack of training in fundamentals, and not a particular medium.

    However, the real media do more for the artist than digital can. They are better at grasping the "handwriting" of brushstrokes, the strokes themselves are less repetitive due to interaction between the support, tool and color, the paint textures create themselves, and so on. Digital medium needs a lot of special attention and tricks to come close to the organic quality of that whole gestalt of texture.

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  6. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagoelius View Post
    Ive often wondered if there is an unseen "energy of the artist" that is somehow channelled and infused through traditional mediums but blocked/diminished when filtered through electronic methods of application? hmmm
    .
    I don't know much about drawing yet but I think I might know the answer to your question Dagoelius. If you check that link: http://harmonicresolution.com/Sensory%20Homunculus.htm you can see how big part of the human brain is connected directly to hands. Hands are the tools of our mind. That is me as a pre school teacher talking

    As for drawing I have to say I have learned a lot from this thread, I even changed the way of holding my pencil and making strokes. Had no idea it matters so much to move the whole arm so thanks for all the info here.

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