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  1. #31
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    If you can't take the heat, stay out of the kitchen....
    Because it's really hard to avoid someone's "presence" in an internet forum.

    And if her comments really bother you that much... Ignore her.
    Can I block posts, emails and messages from specific users?

    If there are particular members that bother you and you do not want to see their posts or receive Private Messages and Emails from them, then you can add these members to your 'Ignore List'. There are several ways to do this:
    Through your User Control Panel: User CP, Settings & Options, Edit Ignore List. Then, type their name into the empty text box and click 'Okay'.

    It's your loss if they happen to give some really good advice somewhere that you won't see, but...

    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
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  3. #32
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    I intentionally ignored the previous posts since the few sentences I glanced over hinted at drama. However I couldn't help starting my Monday off on the wrong foot by reading the whole "incident" and;

    lol u mad.

    This isn't a nice pretty art meadow full of sunshine and kisses and fresh-baked critique cookies delivered to you by jovial, doe-eyed cherubs. This is a paint and pixel-splattered furnace that forges the swords of artistic mastery. This is a place where swarthy and belligerent dwarves drink turpentine mead, berate their apprentices and slap the trade into their skulls. It's where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares.

    So when you cry for paragraphs about how someone posted a single sentence where they criticized your attitude in a rather benign way, it makes all of us dwarves point and laugh at you.





    THESE;


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    Were the very first images I created with my first tablet. They are awful. They're so awful that even with all my inexperience at the time I KNEW they were awful. I soon realized WHY they were so awful; even though I had a nice brand new shiny tablet, I had no idea how to really draw things. the face on the guy on the right is smushed and skewed. the folds on the cloth on the left guy make no sense and he's going to break at the waist. The middle guy has a dildo on his helmet.






    That summer I put away my tablet for some time, started my sketchbook, and drew with only pencils for the better part of a year. A year later;

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    Still pretty awful, but I'm on my way.



    So why, WHY would the lowly pencil (which is so archaic and not worthy of a second of attention from such an evolved being such as yourself) be a superior implement of learning?! It's staggeringly simple;

    No bells and whistles.

    Pencil marks aren't permanent, but sometimes they are a bitch to erase. You can only rework your image so much before the marks are ingrained or the paper falls apart. Photoshop by contrast allows you to ENDLESSLY erase, paint over, resize and move any and all elements of an image. you can eventually match up your frankenstein of a drawing to your reference just by trial and error, which won't teach you a damn thing. Simply put, and if you read anything I've typed here read this, but since I'm being a meanie head and likely to be ignored I'll have it at a font size that will catch the eye;

    A pencil forces you to observe thoughtfully, place your strokes carefully, and learn quickly


    So, before you say "no u dunt understaaaaaand" check the first few pages of my sketchbook. Most if not all the early drawing studies are done in pencil. You are me from the summer of 2006. You can choose to continue struggling with half-assed likenesses done digitally on a slippery tablet that you're not used to, or you can do what I did, discard the tech that you're nowhere near ready to use properly, clutch the graphite that countless others have, and start really drawing.

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  5. #33
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    Ooops no offense meant Mr Arenhaus, I wasnt infected with sarkiness honestly! I was attempting a bit of affectionate crawling and grovelling as I do appreciate what you tell me, honestly mate. I think this thread is a bit antagonistic and its rubbing off on some folks sheeessh!! Lol

    Anyhow back to your point I do suffer from limited space on a computer desk and it is hard for me to do it that way, But because I value your opinion, I shall persevere and keep at it. Like you say its probably the the angle that is causing the issues as I am always drawing flat on the table. I can see what you are on about though.

    So it seems that I need to get re-organised and prop up a board and have a go that way.

    (moans!) I just think I am getting the hang of this drawing lark and I find out there is such a lot more road ahead of me ............... Bugger!

    In all seriousness thanks very much for all the help matey, and to all of you that shoot me down again and again, then pick me up, dust me off and point me back in the right direction.

    Last edited by Lightship69; April 25th, 2011 at 11:34 AM.
    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
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  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaEvil1 View Post
    As for this tablet thing:

    Like I have already stated, I don't work exclusivly on a tablet. But I do have the audacity to want to finish this piece on a tablet. If people thinks that hinders my progress or thinks it makes me posessed by the devil, then I'm sorry, but I don't agree.
    You don't agree based on what? Your years of experience as a draughftsman? Your study and reading of the Masters? Your awareness of traditional methods of study?

    Your hyperbole about people thinking it means you're posessed by the devil is absurd by the way, and an indicator of your own drama.

    Your rejection of more experienced artists offering their advice will only isolate you here. None of us mind a bit of a challenge but hostile rejection by someone completely lacking in experience is ridiculous in the extreme.

    Nevertheless, good luck to you, I'll be interested to see your progress.

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  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Rainville View Post
    This isn't a nice pretty art meadow full of sunshine and kisses and fresh-baked critique cookies delivered to you by jovial, doe-eyed cherubs.
    Bullshit! Is too!

    Oh wait, yeah, it is more like this (which brought a tear to my eye):

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Rainville View Post
    This is a paint and pixel-splattered furnace that forges the swords of artistic mastery. This is a place where swarthy and belligerent dwarves drink turpentine mead, berate their apprentices and slap the trade into their skulls. It's where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares.
    I believe this was left off the Runes album?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Rainville View Post
    clutch the graphite that countless others have, and start really drawing.
    Amen Brother! Let the graphite clutching begin!

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  8. #36
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    I've made my stance clear. Can people who take issue with that lash out against me somewhere else? Thanks.

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  9. #37
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    Not lashing out at all...just trying to help you shed some misconceptions. But you seem dead set on holding on to them so yeah, good luck.

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  10. #38
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    follow up

    I am fortunate enough to have a cintiq one of the fist ones with out 1,000 of levels of sensitivity but still I love it but I have drawn on traditional tablets back in 1993 or 4 when I was in college was when I first discovered Wacom ...anyways I thought I would say this try doing thumbnails set up pages in photoshop that let you do contour drawings..in other words don't lift your pen off the tablet just stare at the photo and draw what you see... do 5-10 of these and the face will be etched in your mind you will then be able to see the face in your minds eye.......on a personal preference note I have a hard time portraying the face in line only but another fun exercise is to start with a black canvas and only add the light it will help you see that light defines shapes......anyways I think it is good that so many people take interest and time to help fellow artists....back in college I hated critique day but I always made better pieces because of it.......

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  11. #39
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    sorry I never replied: I have a bad habit of posting in a thread and not coming back much. Yes, though, that was what I meant: get the proper proportions, the right forms, and the correct placement and you're pretty much good to go. Value, for black and white at least, is key if you want realism. Keep in mind "realism" and "realistic" aren't the same. Realism = looks just like what you're drawing and the viewer feels like they can take it off the page. Realistic means it looks like what you're drawing, as in "Hey, that's a vase!" but you don't necessarily feel like you can water the plants in the vase.

    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
    George Bridgman
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  12. #40
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    Forget drawing pretty girls & concentrate on structure.

    The features are the icing on the structure cake.

    I'm pretty sure there's a tutorial here somewhere called "Drawing Heads" so if you search that you should find enough info to keep you going for months.

    Sydney artist Luke Marcatili

    "Fear is the mindkiller..."
    - The Litany Against Fear
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  13. #41
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    Smile Dont hate it, intergrate it.

    So why, WHY would the lowly pencil (which is so archaic and not worthy of a second of attention from such an evolved being such as yourself) be a superior implement of learning?! It's staggeringly simple;

    No bells and whistles.

    Pencil marks aren't permanent, but sometimes they are a bitch to erase. You can only rework your image so much before the marks are ingrained or the paper falls apart. Photoshop by contrast allows you to ENDLESSLY erase, paint over, resize and move any and all elements of an image. you can eventually match up your frankenstein of a drawing to your reference just by trial and error, which won't teach you a damn thing. Simply put, and if you read anything I've typed here read this, but since I'm being a meanie head and likely to be ignored I'll have it at a font size that will catch the eye;

    A pencil forces you to observe thoughtfully, place your strokes carefully, and learn quickly

    So, before you say "no u dunt understaaaaaand" check the first few pages of my sketchbook. Most if not all the early drawing studies are done in pencil. You are me from the summer of 2006. You can choose to continue struggling with half-assed likenesses done digitally on a slippery tablet that you're not used to, or you can do what I did, discard the tech that you're nowhere near ready to use properly, clutch the graphite that countless others have, and start really drawing.
    Very True Jason.
    Its interesting looking at JR's posted examples how much he's acheived not just technically but also emotionally as well.

    Ive often wondered if there is an unseen "energy of the artist" that is somehow channelled and infused through traditional mediums but blocked/diminished when filtered through electronic methods of application? hmmm
    I am in no way condemming the digitial format, (Im trying to learn it myself) but a common objection from critics of digitally made art, is its' cold and sterile and artists who've solely honed their artistic skills through this format never seemed to (completely)grasp the technical correctness or ability to convey a unique 'gestalt' to their work that traditional artists do.
    The merits of efficiency, economy, colour vibrancy and array of visual effects cannot be denied using digital methods however the mind-eye-hand-to surface connection seems to be be far more prominent and unified with the traditional methods of creating art.
    The truth is every artist benefits through "cross pollenization" from other methods, mediums and styles that seem irrelevant(?)or unrelated to their own.

    back to the thread topic: DaEvil1 have you tried the good old tip of turning your reference picture upside down? This often repeated bit of advice from one artist to another will retrain your mind (and eye) to simply draw the lines and shapes its looking at not what you mind 'thinks' its sees. You'll be surprised in the level of accuracy of your work using this method.

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  14. #42
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    Well I for one am taking the criticism that DaEvil isn't taking and using it. I, too, have been pretty ignorant and stubborn with my tablet, but I think this thread has inspired me to go back to pencil, however much hesitation I may have for it.

    Thanks guys

    Edit: just realized this is a very old thread, and did not mean to bump it. Sorry guys

    Last edited by mRomano; August 12th, 2012 at 07:12 PM.
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  15. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagoelius View Post
    I am in no way condemming the digitial format, (Im trying to learn it myself) but a common objection from critics of digitally made art, is its' cold and sterile and artists who've solely honed their artistic skills through this format never seemed to (completely)grasp the technical correctness or ability to convey a unique 'gestalt' to their work that traditional artists do.
    I'd say that is mostly due to the lack of training in fundamentals, and not a particular medium.

    However, the real media do more for the artist than digital can. They are better at grasping the "handwriting" of brushstrokes, the strokes themselves are less repetitive due to interaction between the support, tool and color, the paint textures create themselves, and so on. Digital medium needs a lot of special attention and tricks to come close to the organic quality of that whole gestalt of texture.

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  16. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dagoelius View Post
    Ive often wondered if there is an unseen "energy of the artist" that is somehow channelled and infused through traditional mediums but blocked/diminished when filtered through electronic methods of application? hmmm
    .
    I don't know much about drawing yet but I think I might know the answer to your question Dagoelius. If you check that link: http://harmonicresolution.com/Sensory%20Homunculus.htm you can see how big part of the human brain is connected directly to hands. Hands are the tools of our mind. That is me as a pre school teacher talking

    As for drawing I have to say I have learned a lot from this thread, I even changed the way of holding my pencil and making strokes. Had no idea it matters so much to move the whole arm so thanks for all the info here.

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