Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 1 to 13 of 32
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,906 Times in 2,547 Posts

    Getting the most out of critique

    Here's a few pointers on how to get the most out of critique you receive:

    1) Analyze whether you agree, disagree or even understand the critique. See how it relates to the work or your approach and development in general.

    2) Consider or verify the source of the critique...particularly if you do not agree with it or it seems confusing. If their work is pretty decent then pay attention, if not then disregard if you don't agree. But always be considerate, polite and thank them. Conflicting critique or advice should definitely be checked out. Some people know what they're talking about, others don't...simply check to see who is who.

    3) Ask for clarification if you don't quite understand a point, but try to be specific, and ask only after you've done some research and checked any references offered. Try to study and understand the points of the critique on your own first.

    4) Follow through...do your best to follow through on the critique you feel is most valid. If someone says you should work with simple forms and shapes to understand value better, by gosh, do some drawings along those lines and post them up. Don't just keep banging away at your "vampire knight mounted on a flying armored dragon"...or, you know, whatever. It is very frustrating to offer sound, carefully considered critique to someone who simply ignores it. Basically it means you will no longer receive valuable critique from that individual.

    5) Don't make excuses...excuses mean you are not ready for critique and the effort required to improve.

    6) If someone recommends a book or resource, get it. It is recommended because it will help you with your development. If this is not an option, you aren't ready for critique.

    7) Don't ask for "tips, tricks or techniques". There aren't any. At least there aren't any someone else can tell you and have you understand. Tips, tricks and techniques are what you develop on your own and they contribute to your own style and expression. They are too subtle, individual and tied to the media and hand skills to be able to communicate easily.

    8) In general, if you are not willing or ready to follow advice and critique, don't bother asking.

    9) Be aware that what may at first seem like harsh critique is still intended to help, or shake you up, or break through all the BS you may have heard. Accept it in the spirit intended.

    10) Keep working hard! But work effectively...

    We now resume your regularly scheduled forum...

    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by JeffX99; April 15th, 2011 at 02:01 PM. Reason: forgot image...again...
    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. The Following 28 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:

    + Show/Hide list of the thanked


  4. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    131
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    There are two big problems with your work:

    - The inane text that doesn't seem to belong anywhere but just seems tacked on. Not very stylish!

    - The triangle and the ball is in completely different styles, try adding some amount of shading to it, to make your composition and what you want to communicate even clearer! \s

    Good post and points. Sticky this pls.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  5. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,906 Times in 2,547 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by DaEvil1 View Post
    There are two big problems with your work:

    - The inane text that doesn't seem to belong anywhere but just seems tacked on. Not very stylish!

    - The triangle and the ball is in completely different styles, try adding some amount of shading to it, to make your composition and what you want to communicate even clearer! \s

    Good post and points. Sticky this pls.
    Thanks! Yeah, that's probably why I got a B on this assignment as I recall! I wanted to use it though because people may find it hard to believe, but this was the first assignment in Advanced Heads and Hands II at the Academy of Art. That's right. A sphere. I got a B and the instructor mentioned I probably shouldn't use White China marker for highlights as it is grease based. He was right.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    131
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Thanks! Yeah, that's probably why I got a B on this assignment as I recall! I wanted to use it though because people may find it hard to believe, but this was the first assignment in Advanced Heads and Hands II at the Academy of Art. That's right. A sphere. I got a B and the instructor mentioned I probably shouldn't use White China marker for highlights as it is grease based. He was right.
    Heh! That's kind of surprising. I suppose it just goes to show just how important the basic shapes and it's interplay with the surroundings really are in art.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,839
    Thanks
    2,658
    Thanked 1,049 Times in 685 Posts
    Jeff,

    You really didn't try and push the values of the ball. The inherent color of the ball is the same as the background which almost flattens out the object, except for the dark shadow.

    Oh, and there's all this text above it that REALLY doesn't add to the overall study itself.



    Edit: and here's a good example of someone who knows how to take a critique and work from it-
    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=218499

    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to OmenSpirits For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,906 Times in 2,547 Posts
    I know OS - I was trying to explain my theoretical understanding of the sphere via my Jungian connection to the sub-conscious Id. The sphere doesn't really exist at all...only my dreams of the sphere.

    Edit: And yes Omen - that is an excellent example of a solid critique thread and the effort to improve. Good job mina - and everyone helping.

    Last edited by JeffX99; April 15th, 2011 at 08:48 PM. Reason: Adding...
    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    137
    Thanks
    19
    Thanked 29 Times in 26 Posts
    Hey that's my thread I am really lucky to be receiving so much help from everyone in it. I had been drawing everything blindly for so long just from a few random tutorials and imagination, I never really sought after critique until recently. I used to just throw out anything I tried to draw that confused or frustrated me. So I really can't understand when people post here and just dismiss all the useful critique they receive... I know some people are sensitive about their work but I have never seen a post in a critique thread that wasn't helpful and constructive.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    131
    Thanks
    54
    Thanked 36 Times in 33 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    I know OS - I was trying to explain my theoretical understanding of the sphere via my Jungian connection to the sub-conscious Id. The sphere doesn't really exist at all...only my dreams of the sphere.
    Tssss, next thing you're gonna claim that it's an abstract piece to be excempt from having to improve composition, contrasts and lightplay!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  13. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fehérvárcsurgó, Hungary
    Posts
    2,543
    Thanks
    851
    Thanked 1,171 Times in 996 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    I know OS - I was trying to explain my theoretical understanding of the sphere via my Jungian connection to the sub-conscious Id. The sphere doesn't really exist at all...only my dreams of the sphere.
    It all makes sense now... But I didn't see it without your explanation. You need to express this all with visual tools only, without additional text, you know.
    The picture itself should tell the story!
    {Besides, a sphere of dreams should use some more colors in my opinion. But I understand our dreams differ...}
    But it's a really nice start

    Oh, that topic Nice example, people often abandon their painting after receiving crits, I don't know why. Well, in some cases critics persuade them they should study the basics instead... There are some not very soft critics here but I must say they are usually right.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,839
    Thanks
    2,658
    Thanked 1,049 Times in 685 Posts
    *Bump*



    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  15. #11
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,895
    Thanks
    901
    Thanked 948 Times in 813 Posts
    Hi guys

    I feel the need for my soapbox, sorry!

    This is a really good thread to put up, because in my opinion, there are an awful lot of people posting on here that just seem to want you to blow sunshine up them and take them to a happy place where they are admired and loved by all who dare gaze upon them and thier work. Instead they get a bit of critisism and go on the attack, and its suddenly personal and not helpful to anyone!

    All I can say is if thats what you want "loads of smiles and pats on the back" then show your work to your aunties and uncles and other family members that love you and will spare your delicate sensibilities.

    In here you get a damn sight more positive information and solid feedback that can sometimes be described as a bit harsh. Sometimes they even tell you to bin the work and start again, go back to the beginning with the fundamentals.

    But look at it this way, if you want to work in the illustration industry, go freelance and get paid commisions, take a shot at a book illustractor job or whatever then the critisism youre gonna get are going to be a lot more harsh. These people are running a business and they want more bang for their bucks. Also some will want concorde standard work from you but are willing only to pay bus fare, this is a hard business where people want to make as much money as they can, as do you.

    To get the good money jobs you need to be very good at this game, and more importantly you need a thick skin to take the hits, then pick yourself up and go and do better!

    To answer shiNIN's point
    " people often abandon their painting after receiving crits, I don't know why. Well, in some cases critics persuade them they should study the basics instead... "
    These people get disheartened and give up for a great many reasons the crits from here might be the last straw. For example my own family said to me way back in the day "theres no future and no money in such childishness" and "go and get a propper job that pays" and so for years I stopped drawing and built mixing desks and recording studio equipment, and hated myself!

    Thats just me though it might just be that some people have bigger dreams than abilities, I dont know. But I do know that there are always going to be people who hate your work and will tell you so in no uncertain terms, citisism is a part of life and you need to find a better way of dealing with it than goind to your room and having a sulk!

    I agree whole heartedly with you shiNIN There are some hard critics here but I must say they are usually right. but it wouldnt hurt to try and sugar coat it a bit!

    Look at jeffs points 1 - 10 above, print them out and stick them over the monitor and learn from your crits and mistakes.

    See you on the road to understanding guys and thanks.

    Last edited by Lightship69; May 14th, 2011 at 09:06 AM.
    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  16. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Lightship69 For This Useful Post:


  17. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    435
    Thanks
    108
    Thanked 149 Times in 140 Posts
    I feel the need to add a comment here( and therefore bump this up to the top .)

    On the topic of harsh critique I know it sucks to hear people rip your stuff to shreds but it's easier for people to tell you what you're doing wrong as oppose to praising what is right. The flaws always jump out way more than the well executed parts of something. It's just the way people see things.

    Besides if I point out your strengths and you continue to focus on those. What good is that?

    So a harsh critique or being told you lack certain skills doesn't mean you're a failure it just means that your work has some weaknesses that need to be worked on and sometimes they can't be improved by continuing with the questioned piece, they come from your process of construction and knowledge of art. I try to be as nice as I can giving people critique but there's only so many ways you can sweeten the bitter truth.


    Just know that everybody who has strong art skills has gotten them by listening to the criticism of their peers and by working through their weaknesses.

    Last edited by wooden mango; May 17th, 2011 at 12:43 PM.
    My sketchbook

    DA

    "This is a paint and pixel-splattered furnace that forges the swords of artistic mastery. This is a place where swarthy and belligerent dwarves drink turpentine mead, berate their apprentices and slap the trade into their skulls. It's where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares." --Jason Rainville
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

  18. The Following User Says Thank You to wooden mango For This Useful Post:


  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Vienna
    Posts
    2,109
    Thanks
    801
    Thanked 911 Times in 455 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by wooden mango View Post
    On the topic of harsh critique I know it sucks to hear people rip your stuff to shreds but it's easier for people to tell you what you're doing wrong as oppose to praising what is right. The flaws always jump out way more than the well executed parts of something. It's just the way people see things.
    i object to that wholeheartedly. seeing flaws and the ability to put it into words is a matter of knowledge, and not something people inherit.

    i actually see no need in praising the good parts... that they aint mentioned in the critique could aswell be taken as praise... writing critique and input is an effort that in itself can be considered praise/respect imo.

    newest sketchbook
    oil paintings

    "Have only 4 values, but all the edges you want." Glen Orbik
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote

Page 1 of 3 1 2 3 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 160

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook