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  1. #1
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    Brain Left side right side JeffX99

    I've been noticing when I'm painting that , although I work the canvas equally , at the end I tend to favor the left side, the right side I need to get it done as fast as possible

    does anyone have this condition

    I'll direct this to JeffX99 since he does canvas work

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  3. #2
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    since you noticed it and if it needs to be changed, change it.

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    Hey RangerX - you mean you tend to focus and develop the left side and leave the right side to just be thrown together toward the end? Just want to make sure I'm clear on the problem. Like sone one says, if you notice it that is a good thing - can't fix or work through things you're unaware of. So just try to consciously force yourself to develop the entire thing - select or design compositions that are heavier on the right - things like that.

    Also remember to design/compose for one strong center of interest - subduing other elements to support your statement.

    I hope that helps and answers your question? Post a couple examples and I'm sure some others will have good advice.

    Edit after Elwell's comment: Absolutely - or look at it in a mirror. I like to look at my paintings in very dim light once I get them blocked in - quickly reduces them to value pattern and big shapes and I know if I'm on the right track - frequently I have to adjust.

    Last edited by JeffX99; April 10th, 2011 at 04:04 PM.
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    Turn it upside down.


    Tristan Elwell
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  9. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Hey RangerX - you mean you tend to focus and develop the left side and leave the right side to just be thrown together toward the end? Just want to make sure I'm clear on the problem. Like sone one says, if you notice it that is a good thing - can't fix or work through things you're unaware of. So just try to consciously force yourself to develop the entire thing - select or design compositions that are heavier on the right - things like that.

    Also remember to design/compose for one strong center of interest - subduing other elements to support your statement.

    I hope that helps and answers your question? Post a couple examples and I'm sure some others will have good advice.

    Edit after Elwell's comment: Absolutely - or look at it in a mirror. I like to look at my paintings in very dim light once I get them blocked in - quickly reduces them to value pattern and big shapes and I know if I'm on the right track - frequently I have to adjust.
    thanks will stay aware now plus have more patience

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