How should i go about developing my art skills.
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 30 of 31
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    How should i go about developing my art skills.

    I know the answer is practice, but i mean how do yuo study. Do i get a bunch of art books and mimic relentlessly. Do i constantly draw in pen and only draw from still life. What techniques and help can you offer. id really like to start improving my work.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    By studying, understanding and practicing the fundamentals.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Posts
    1,819
    Thanks
    1,540
    Thanked 1,837 Times in 521 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    dude if you have to ask, you're not really inspired. It shouldn't feel like a shore that you want to get better at. do art that makes you happy and eventually you will improve out of habit of just doing it. Do what you want

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to nauvice For This Useful Post:


  6. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    367
    Thanks
    130
    Thanked 79 Times in 64 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It is kind of what zwarrior says. The first pictures that I drew from life (which you can see in my sketchbook), I had no idea of how to go about rendering. Well, I recently started drawing a chair and said to myself "I want to do as good as a job as I can with this thing." I'm about 8-10 hours in and, with no idea how to render, I just went for it - trying to make the values blend and look exactly as to what I'm looking at. It's a challenge, (mind racking at times) but it's also pretty fun to experiment and to figure out what works.

    I think once you are in the right frame of mind, it will come naturally to you to want to try and go beyond what you are comfortable with to get better.

    Sketchbook: There and Back again Updated- 7/04/12
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    47
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 27 Times in 14 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Anyone who thinks there's a "more efficient" route than simply working your ass off (mindfully!) is a fool. So just draw. If you don't have this mind set, you're just going to get hung up on theories and methods and never really delve into the TRUE art of PRACTICE.

    Stop staring at the fork and just immerse yourself in the taste. Figuring out what works for you is far more valuable than figuring out what does or doesn't work for others.

    Seems like everyone's just looking for a cookie-cutter path to awesomeness these days. Ahhh the instant gratification generation, ain't it grand!

    Last edited by Phight; April 6th, 2011 at 02:59 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Williston, Vermont
    Posts
    550
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 156 Times in 102 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    First of all... every method works differently for every person. There is no right or wrong answer or right or wrong method. There is only the art that is produced in the end. The first thing that you have to do is to find what you like to do (landscapes, still lifes, concept art, comics, abstract, collage, etc..).

    Once you figure out what you like to do, the next step is to figure out the best way to go about it. As JeffX99 says, it's all about fundamentals. Play. Have fun. Work on the fundamental aspects that you like.

    So, I like to paint landscapes with odd shapes in it. First I started with pen/ink to just draw the landscapes and create realistic looking shapes. Once I was happy with my drawings, I started painting landscapes to get the look that I want. After that, I started drawing still lifes and then painted still lifes. Now, i mix the two. For me, I know where my weak areas are and am constantly trying to improve them.

    So, in essence, figure out what you want to do, figure out the medium that you like, work on creating the basic art, and then work on the fundamental portions that you are weak on to produce a piece that is more towards your liking.

    Dougie

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  9. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Doug Hoppes For This Useful Post:


  10. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    24
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    @zwarrior: Its not something that feels like a chore. I posted this because ive been feeling overwhelmed just with the mere choices of how to go about study and just wanted to hear some other things people did to get the ball rolling on that.

    @Mathew: Thanks man.

    @Phight: Nothing to do with instant gratification. And i do practice alot drawing things that i enjoy drawing. But there isnt much improvement. Which is why i made this lol

    @Doug: thanks man i think that this is probably been the most helpful post in this thread.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I say it all the time - there is really only one way to develop yourself as an artist - you need to learn how to observe and translate what you see onto a two dimensional surface. There are five main fundamental principles that allow that: composition, accurate drawing of shape/perspective, value, edges, and color. That is in order of importance.

    How you go about studying and understanding those principles is up to you, but the best way to get a handle on it is by studying from life. Keep it very simple at first - basic still lifes are the easist to begin with. I recommend two books that will help a great deal: "Drawing Essentials" by Deborah Rockman and James Gurney's "Imaginitive Realism". They make a great pair because one covers observational drawing and Jim's covers how to work from imagination. For a great book on composition and environments I recommend Jack Hamm's "Drawing Scenery".

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following User Says Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    183
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 104 Times in 57 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I got a styrofoam cube, a few spheres, and a cardboard cone along with a can of flat white paint at a craft store (most of this stuff is in the floral section) for less than $15. Those things along with a desklamp can be used to work on things like composition, accurate drawing, edges, and value.

    Among the 1 million other things you feel the need to practice, this one's pretty simple.

    It took me like three hours to finish the shading on your upper lip. It's probably the best drawing I've ever done.



    My sketchbook (it'll get good near the end)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to J@n!t For This Useful Post:


  15. #10
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by J@n!t View Post
    I got a styrofoam cube, a few spheres, and a cardboard cone along with a can of flat white paint at a craft store (most of this stuff is in the floral section) for less than $15. Those things along with a desklamp can be used to work on things like composition, accurate drawing, edges, and value.

    Among the 1 million other things you feel the need to practice, this one's pretty simple.
    Don't you have a horse skull handy too?!

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    @Captain.Colour I was about to post the same question, but now there is no need.
    Thanks for the good advice everyone.

    Just to throw in my 2 cents, I find fallen crab apples and flower pedals make a fun still life for practicing color.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. The Following User Says Thank You to LucidCognition For This Useful Post:


  18. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Silicon Valley
    Posts
    183
    Thanks
    84
    Thanked 104 Times in 57 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Don't you have a horse skull handy too?!
    That was at school-- and it disappeared after we drew it one time! Booo!!!

    There are 11 horse skulls at my place, but they are all inside living horses

    It took me like three hours to finish the shading on your upper lip. It's probably the best drawing I've ever done.



    My sketchbook (it'll get good near the end)
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. The Following User Says Thank You to J@n!t For This Useful Post:


  20. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    246
    Thanks
    53
    Thanked 47 Times in 24 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Just do blind contour drawings. It's what makes a great artist great.

    http://www.bfowler.com

    Blog

    Twitter

    Available for work!
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  21. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Seattle
    Posts
    226
    Thanks
    127
    Thanked 148 Times in 78 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Get ready to use a lot of paper. I'd recommend having a sketch book and cheaper loose leaf filler paper so you can do more finished stuff in the book and random stuff all over the filler paper. That's what I'm trying right now.

    "A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step."
    Lao-tzu, Chinese philosopher (604 BC - 531 BC)

    My SketchBook.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    You attempt to make the kind of art that you'd like to hang on your wall.

    Fail, repeat.

    Last edited by Flake; April 6th, 2011 at 09:54 PM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  23. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Flake For This Useful Post:


  24. #16
    OmenSpirits's Avatar
    OmenSpirits is offline Commercial-Illustrator in-training, NOT an artist. Level 13 Gladiator: Retiarius
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Birth Place of the World, NYC
    Posts
    2,826
    Thanks
    2,622
    Thanked 1,042 Times in 680 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0


    You must, draw this pebble. Once you are able to snatch this pebble from your page, you will have truly become...an artist!



    "Everything must serve the idea. The means used to convey the idea should be the simplest and clear. Just what is required. No extra images. To me this is a universal principle of art. Saying as much as possible with a minimum of means."
    -John Huston, Director
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  25. #17
    Arshes Nei's Avatar
    Arshes Nei is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Torrance, CA
    Posts
    6,802
    Thanks
    2,278
    Thanked 4,259 Times in 2,074 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Sometimes I wonder when people ask what's the best, if they think somewhere there's some artist hiding this best method from anyone and is only selling it for the price of 400 children's souls.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  26. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Arshes Nei For This Useful Post:


  27. #18
    hunchback's Avatar
    hunchback is offline I disagree! PENIS! TACO! CHEWBACCA!
    Level 8 Gladiator: Thracian
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    ottawa, ontario
    Posts
    1,223
    Thanks
    2,692
    Thanked 557 Times in 350 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    a while back, I imagined there was such a thing. Ive tryed them all. Videos, books, interviews. scrounging the internet to find that secret technique. Its an obsession.

    I bought Markos DVD thinking it would show me how to draw awesome. The guy never went to college and got a job as a production artist while in his teens. Of course there has to be a secret, right? I mean, shit!, no one just got out of the womb and started painting amazing.

    Sooo i got the dvd, freaked out like OMG, put in and watched the entire thing.

    Guess what?

    he just did it.

    It wasnt like there was some new fangled approach to drawing. some certain way he held the pencl. what kind of paper he used. It had some cool tips about design and making cool characters but it was hardly the eye opener that i had expected it to be.

    so now im scratching my head. well what the fuck do i do now?





    DRAW!

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  28. The Following User Says Thank You to hunchback For This Useful Post:


  29. #19
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Williston, Vermont
    Posts
    550
    Thanks
    38
    Thanked 156 Times in 102 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, it's amazing how many people want to know the "Secret". My instructor was telling a story about a woman in her plein-air class who asked: "Where did you get the tube of Sky Paint?" I always wanted to make up some tubes (I tube a lot of my own colors) and call them "Sky Paint", "Ground Paint", "Elm Tree Paint", etc. Just to show people when I'm demonstrating :-)

    Just like I'm always told: "I wish that I could do that. But, I can't draw a straight line". I usually tell them that I can't draw a straight line either (doesn't exist in nature) and for that, I definitely need a ruler. I always tell them that they can. They just need to have the desire to do it a LOT.

    Dougie

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  30. #20
    p sage's Avatar
    p sage is offline in pursuit of hot lines Level 14 Gladiator: Dimacheri
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,463
    Thanks
    3,896
    Thanked 1,666 Times in 1,468 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Captain.Colour View Post
    I know the answer is practice, but i mean how do yuo study. Do i get a bunch of art books and mimic relentlessly.
    No, don't mimic or mindlessly copy.

    As others have said, try for understanding.

    I think the guy saying "blind contour drawing" is trolling.

    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

    The Road to Perdition
    clog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  31. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Palo Alto, California
    Posts
    220
    Thanks
    77
    Thanked 64 Times in 57 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Pretty much what P-sage said, when i picked up Loomis i did as much reading as i did sketching. Same with Bridgman! you want to get the techniques down, not copy the books page for page.

    My Sketchbook!This scrub needs your guidance

    Very Cool Guys:
    Lakai ---- Whirly
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  32. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    VA/LA
    Posts
    778
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 377 Times in 165 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Most drawing approaches have a lot in common. I disagree with the point of view that you'll master drawing just by practicing. You need a kind of method, a framework to understand the visual phenomena in the world. The most important things to consider are to move systematically, starting with the simplest assessment first (like gesture first) and eventually work down to specifics. Read Harold Speed's The Science and Practice of Drawing, you can find it free online.

    -Ramon

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  33. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ramon Hurtado For This Useful Post:


  34. #23
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by panchosimpson View Post
    Most drawing approaches have a lot in common. I disagree with the point of view that you'll master drawing just by practicing.
    Just curious where this was said?

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  35. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    VA/LA
    Posts
    778
    Thanks
    95
    Thanked 377 Times in 165 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    it's just a general belief that floats around, I didn't mean that it was particularly expressed in this thread.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  36. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Ramon Hurtado For This Useful Post:


  37. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    3,432
    Thanks
    643
    Thanked 1,484 Times in 719 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by panchosimpson View Post
    Read Harold Speed's The Science and Practice of Drawing, you can find it free online.
    http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/14264

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  38. The Following User Says Thank You to Flake For This Useful Post:


  39. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Posts
    1,306
    Thanks
    528
    Thanked 525 Times in 302 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Price of 400 children's souls.
    So, that's your secret!

    Try this:
    buy sketchbook!
    buy pens!
    take sketchbook somewhere!
    look at someone or thing!
    draw thing!
    rinse and repeat!

    I'm currently reading Handbook of drawing by William Walker, Constructive Anatomy by Bridgman, and The element of drawing and John Ruskin.

    *** Sketchbook and other stuff ***

    Flashback's SB

    Anatomy Atlas

    Digital Galleries

    Visit & Support:
    http://www.ctrlpaint.com/
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  40. #27
    p sage's Avatar
    p sage is offline in pursuit of hot lines Level 14 Gladiator: Dimacheri
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    3,463
    Thanks
    3,896
    Thanked 1,666 Times in 1,468 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    Sometimes I wonder when people ask what's the best, if they think somewhere there's some artist hiding this best method from anyone and is only selling it for the price of 400 children's souls.
    The answer to that is, "yes, there is a secret to drawing; but you have to be an expert draftsman to understand it"



    Thinking connects desire with creation.
    How good are you?

    The Road to Perdition
    clog
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  41. The Following User Says Thank You to p sage For This Useful Post:


  42. #28
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by panchosimpson View Post
    it's just a general belief that floats around, I didn't mean that it was particularly expressed in this thread.
    Ah...yeah, totally agree with that, and you're right - another one of those common misconceptions. You can practice really hard, for a long time, in the wrong manner...and end up nowhere.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  43. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  44. #29
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    ORL, Florida
    Posts
    1,044
    Thanks
    564
    Thanked 388 Times in 267 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    Ah...yeah, totally agree with that, and you're right - another one of those common misconceptions. You can practice really hard, for a long time, in the wrong manner...and end up nowhere.
    Yup. My friend has been drawing for 3 years straight, and I started in August of last year. I'm already way, way ahead of him. He only drew from his head without reference.

    BLAHBLAHBLAH
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  45. #30
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    New York, NY, USA 10002
    Posts
    883
    Thanks
    800
    Thanked 305 Times in 212 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Drop everything for a moment and study perspective, unless you are going to be an abstract artist. Experiment with thumbnail sketches of blocks in perspective until you get the hang of it. Then go on to anatomy. Because your human figure could look distorted if you don't have some sense of perspective (something I struggled with as I tried to draw an imaginary person from a top down view). Perspective also allows you to put figures relatively at different heights without distorting them. When it comes to shading or rendering or how light produces the shadows and shades on an object, use references from a photo studio and not from some random reference with a lot of interfering lights, because too many light can confuse the student. Once you know how one lighting works, you can estimate how two lightings can affect an object.

    The rest are just studies, e.g. human anatomy studies, cars, or bird anatomy studies. But in general, they still constitute your ability to draw. This is better done with 3D objects (albeit being hard to draw something such as a life bird unless you have one in a cage as a pet, as they don't stay still, and that is why people order skeletons and buy sculptures for reference). Once you have a firm foundation, you can manipulate things and start being creative. You can modify cars to look something from a sci-fi movie or create monsters that have wings with your knowledge of birds.

    It should be noted that drawing is mostly done with the mind than hand. You can have the most precise hand, but if all you can draw are straight lines that represents nothing practical, it won't take you anywhere. This also means that just drawing copies whether 3D or 2D is not enough unless you learn something.

    When drawing a big picture. Always allow time for yourself to take several steps back and see your work from a distance and then compare it to the object you are drawing.

    Last edited by Vay; April 8th, 2011 at 02:59 AM.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Members who have read this thread: 1

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •