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  1. #235
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    Quote Originally Posted by velderia View Post
    I read about stockholm syndrome prior to that accident.
    I hate to be nit-picking, but it's an important difference. Again.. it's the "Bystander effect". Not Stockholm syndrome... Think of it this way. Bystanders are passive whilst kidnappers in Stockholm are hot. It's probably not acurate, but I bet its easier to remember the difference this way.

    I'm the complete opposite though.. If I see someone fall. I will rush over to see if that person needs help. Probably because I would not expect anyone else to do so.. But I did once see a similar episode. An elderly woman fell on a loose tile. 4 people rushed to help her up and one went in the store and seemed angry as he talked to the personel. It's probably a rare thing, but it does happen.
    If my friend is attacked at a bar I WOULD bite back, despite the agressor being huge, and although I don't personally expect much of people. I do expect my friends would do the same for me. Even my male friends.

    Last edited by Lady Medusa; April 20th, 2011 at 03:11 AM. Reason: typo
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  4. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by damascus57 View Post
    To be perfectly honest.. I kinda expect nothing less from the OP. In fact when I saw the title I immediately thought 'Ah, a Naomi thread!'

    I actually don't know who you are, and this statement puzzles me. I spend most of my time at another forum where such topics would be met with a multitude of "Meh, interesting" or mild agreement or disagreement. We have manual registrations - signing up requires passing a psych/intelligence test with no questions - just a blank box of "tell us about yourself". People have been turned down for all kinds of weirdass reasons, but the forums themselves require no moderation at all - although occasionally some entertainment fodder is let in to heat the place up a bit. No opposition can be terribly boring.

    My initial post was pretty nondescript, at the most I expected some defense of the Lion King. I thought it was pretty ironic the letter had Snow White on it. The recipient of the letter gave up art and animation forever according to her family.




    Anyways the whole gender bias on protection bothers me. Women are very protective by nature, they have to be - they are troupe animals just like the others, and they carry the young. This is pretty much a given that they will be protective. *People* can and will help other *people* given a chance. It has little to do with sex, culture perhaps but not so in the US from my experience. Some men have bouts of solipsism - they like protecting females and being chivalrous, and automatically think females are the opposite - a receptive "lady" - sure - in China Yin and Yang are Feminine and Masculine, yet the third principle, Jen, the Man line is neither. *Man* is neither wholly masculine nor feminine, but a mixture of both. You can tend towards one end of the spectrum or another but it's still going to be a mix.


    The same one which can be seen when a Bull Elk protects his cows? Or a female elephant protects her young from lions? It is the same instinct...not some weird expectation.
    Elk don't live in cities with mass stores of nuclear bombs, computers and vast social structures involving mobile global communication networks.

    I've shot a female Elk...not sure where the Bull was but I could have shot him too. Anyways....crazy monkeys with guns are a totally different animal, with a completely different set of enviromental hazards.

    Last edited by Izi; April 20th, 2011 at 05:20 AM.
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  6. #237
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    According to cladistics, which is starting (?) to gain popularity over Linnean taxonomy in biology, birds are dinosaurs. I swear that this makes them at least 200% more entertaining to watch.
    That was so funny, and so true It actually took me a few years to actually grok what Bakker was saying in The Dinosaur Heresies as it pertains to our modern world but once you realize this, and maybe see Jurassic Park - geese suddenly become horrifically creepy.

    Last I checked they were treating Dinosauria as its own class. It would make sense to group them in some way but even I have a hard time wrapping my head around Triceratops and Ostriches sharing close family lines. Although I do seem to remember Triceratops and being bird-hipped...

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  7. #238
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naomi Ningishzidda View Post
    I spend most of my time at another forum where such topics would be met with a multitude of "Meh, interesting" or mild agreement or disagreement. We have manual registrations - signing up requires passing a psych/intelligence test with no questions - just a blank box of "tell us about yourself". People have been turned down for all kinds of weirdass reasons, but the forums themselves require no moderation at all - although occasionally some entertainment fodder is let in to heat the place up a bit. No opposition can be terribly boring.
    Translation:

    "I'm the Queen Breeze in my Kingdom of Wind. I have a great treehouse in the clouds, where I'm an upstanding and important member, where I'm powerful and intelligent and I sit in there wasting time and feeling important. We have absolute power to deny membership based on completely arbitrary criteria. What a rush! Ah to be an elitist at my own power game created out of thin air, and you should come try to join so I can get a thrill up my arse being in a position to judge you. We do transmutational yoga and eat alchemy sandwiches and ride flying unicorns of esoteric freudian solipsism while googling anthropology. Whee! We're brainy as brainy can be, up in our imaginary treehouse in the clouds... where we'll live forever, eleven years old and immortal, dominating the universe without ever leaving our pyjamas!"

    This has been a babelfish transliterational educational production.

    Signing off.
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  9. #239
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naomi Ningishzidda View Post
    Hi all,
    I did some digging over coffee and found this remarkably well preserved letter copied and posted on Flickr.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/polaroi...5233/?edited=1


    I hope you all enjoy....
    If you dug further you'd see I already mentioned this letter years ago

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  10. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arshes Nei View Post
    If you dug further you'd see I already mentioned this letter years ago
    I highly doubt we were going to see posts easily from 2008. 2008 seems like yesterday but it's actually 3 years ago, and we have different people discussing the same thing.

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  12. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naomi Ningishzidda View Post
    Elk don't live in cities with mass stores of nuclear bombs, computers and vast social structures involving mobile global communication networks.
    Neither did "Man" until relatively recently. As I've tried to point out, you don't overcome millenia of evolutionary behavior by wishing or even inventing. Eventually yes, through more millenia of stable, conscientious effort/invention you can direct and impact evolution, but not in just a few hundred years (since firearms), for ourselves at least.

    That's my take on it anyway...though it is interesting that humans have had, and are able to develop significant diversity or variation in some domestic animals. Dogs for example...though they are still all the same species, not even sub-species yet. Recent genetics studies indicate that dogs have a very "slipper" set of genes within the genome that allows for this variability, something we've taken advantage of. Still, these variations of breeds do not change the deeper nature of the animal.

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  13. #242
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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    That's my take on it anyway...though it is interesting that humans have had, and are able to develop significant diversity or variation in some domestic animals. Dogs for example...though they are still all the same species, not even sub-species yet. Recent genetics studies indicate that dogs have a very "slipper" set of genes within the genome that allows for this variability, something we've taken advantage of. Still, these variations of breeds do not change the deeper nature of the animal.
    But the evolutionary process of domestication itself does change "the deeper nature of the animal." This started to become evident with Dmitry Belyaev's fox breeding experiments in Siberia, but now it seems similar genetic processes can be stimulated in other non-domestic animals as well. And, perhaps, those processes are at least partially responsible for what makes humans different from other primates. There's a good article on the foxes and their implications in last month's National Geographic.


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  15. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by velderia View Post
    I highly doubt we were going to see posts easily from 2008. 2008 seems like yesterday but it's actually 3 years ago, and we have different people discussing the same thing.
    Indeed, but at least the tone of the thread was better back then vs now. (Not all of it though)

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  16. #244
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    these threads always give me a good laugh. I can't 'not' sigh after saying that.

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  17. #245
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    Sarskia, I did take a look at that article just now while I had a bit of time. It is really well done. Especially the part about the end no one else had mentioned in the articles I was examining, that the schizophrenic feel of Disney films is actually due to the creative process itself. Thank you for posting it.

    One little thing I do have issue with is they mention Japan being historically more repressive to women than the West. I think it's worth it to know the importance of priestesses in Japanese both prehistorically and up until the Meiji period. The shaman-priestess of Japan seemed to be following the same rules of Shamanism the Chinese and Greeks were.

    Considering the history of the Church in Europe, I would find it very hard to believe *Japan* who honors a sun goddess and who practices the sexual liberated rituals of classical Asian shamanism is more repressive than the Roman Catholic Church of virgin baby mommas who never have sex with women (St. Augustine even argued women have no soul) run by male priests, who also are not allowed to have sex, who also enjoy an occasional (female) witch roasting.

    It´s good to make comparissons with movies that do it right, Christine Hoff Kraemer has written a nice essay comparing Nausicaä, Mononokehime, Pocahontas and Mulan ( can be read here : http://www.inhumandecency.org/christine/miyazaki.html ) where she points out the difference about how the characters are portrayed.


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  18. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by Naomi Ningishzidda View Post
    Considering the history of the Church in Europe, I would find it very hard to believe *Japan* who honors a sun goddess and who practices the sexual liberated rituals of classical Asian shamanism is more repressive than the Roman Catholic Church of virgin baby mommas who never have sex with women (St. Augustine even argued women have no soul) run by male priests, who also are not allowed to have sex, who also enjoy an occasional (female) witch roasting.
    Not to favor one belief in an imaginary friend over another, you can't judge a society's treatment of minorities by their religion. Religion is fantasy, not a thermometer of social tolerance. Idolizing a made-up woman is not empowerment. It's masturbating to a heavily airbrushed magazine cover.

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  19. #247
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    I suppose we could say the same about Obama before he got elected - he was a fantasy that could never live up to people's expectations - but that doesn't make the void Obama can't fill any less real. People's ideas about religion are so powerful they don't believe *Amaterasu* is "made up". So you are wrong on that count. However, we both know she really *is* made up. So look at why she was made up - the Japanese not only wanted, but needed a powerful, heavenly goddess who represented the most important object in their universe. That says a lot about their society. What Amaterasu represents is very real.

    Denial of man's tedency to externalize internal subconscious feelings and collective feelings of a society is a retarded summation of what religion actually is.

    Humans *are* what they put on altars, like it or not.

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