Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts

    Buy skull or full skeleton?

    I'm going to buy an anatomical skull to help me learn the human head. But should I just buy the whole skeleton? Would having a skeleton on hand help me to learn anatomy, enough to justify $350? For those that have studied human anatomy/life drawing, would buying the full skeleton be a good investment?
    Last edited by Poe; April 14th, 2004 at 10:36 PM.


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,202
    Thanks
    4,876
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    If you want to spend the money, you could get the high quality skull plus this skeleton for under $300.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Thanks for replying Elwell. It may just be the photos, but the "budget" skeleton's skull (with the three removable teeth) seems a little... wonky.

    budget vs classic
    Buy skull or full skeleton?Buy skull or full skeleton?
    Last edited by Poe; April 14th, 2004 at 11:56 PM.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,202
    Thanks
    4,876
    Thanked 16,685 Times in 5,021 Posts
    I agree, that's why I suggested also going with the more expensive skull. You can never have too many skulls.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Sothern Cal/Oregon
    Posts
    5
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    I don't think you are going to have any problems with a cheaper skull if all you want to do is learn about the shape of the human head. People have different shaped heads, so the "wonkey skull" just came from someone with a different shaped head. Price difference probably comes down more to material and time spent making it more than anything. As to buying the whole skeleton, I don't think you will find much help unless you are actually drawing skeletons. What I would think would be better is something that shows actual musculature as the musculature is actually what makes most of the finer details of the human body.
    Ita erat quando hic adveni

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    NewYork
    Posts
    1,407
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
    hmmm...I kinda disagree. I think learning about the skeletal system is every bit as important as learning the musculature of the human body. I studied (and still do) human anatomy and figure drawing and I found it very useful to know the structure of our skeletal system. It's not even that important to learn the names of all the bones (or muscles) - it helps in conversation with other artists/professors/know-it-alls - but as long as you know it's there - and you know what you are looking at.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    japan
    Posts
    225
    Thanks
    0
    Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
    I agree the skeleton is EXTREMELY important. Why do you think every anatomy book for artists starts with an in depth explanation of the skeleton and then goes on to the muscles? There are many places on the body where the bone protrudes and they are great points of reference for measuring. If you don't know where the skeleton is, and where the muscles attatch to the bones, it will show. I've noticed a signifcant improvement in my figure drawing since I've been studying the skeleton.

    Personally I would buy the more expensive skull. It'll be a much more worthwhile investment. Even once you've memorized every onok and cranny of skull, you can still use that skull as a really good study of light and shadow to increase your rendering abilities.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,419
    Thanks
    174
    Thanked 359 Times in 305 Posts
    Good thread.
    AFAIC, the skeleton is far MORE important than the musculature in anatomy. Separate them and what have you got? A skeleton and... a sack of flesh lying on the floor. I bought myself a 3' skeleton called Mr. Thrifty that's used for medical schools and such. Don't remember the name of the catalog anymore, but I'll se if I can dig it up, cause it's a great bargain. When I got mine they were selling factory irregulars for a heavy price reduction.... I think I paid like $50.00. The reason they're irregulars is just because some of the screws are sticking out too far and stuff.. nothing that affects it anatomically. I know they're more expensive now, but not too much. A 3 foot skeleton is a lot easier to keep around than a lifesize one. I didn't like the skull on it though, soI also bought a decent skull from Dick Blick.

    After really studying the skelton closely, I came to realize that basically every form you see on the surface id there on the skeleton. Follow the curvature of the humerous fro example, and you'll see the same indents and bumps that exist on the outer surface of the upper arm. It's only really at the abdomen and the neck, and to some extent the inner thighs, where flesh takes the form more than bone. Hands feet, chest, the head... almost all bony forms.
    "Figure drawing prepares you for painting at a high level" - Jeff Watts

    Sketchbook

Similar Threads

  1. Human skull & arm skeleton 3d pdf's
    By Ville_S in forum REFERENCES & INSPIRATIONS
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: August 13th, 2011, 07:17 AM
  2. Skeleton WiP
    By Neolight in forum Art Critique Center
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: April 12th, 2009, 06:03 PM
  3. Art: Constructed Skull VS. Real Skull
    By HunterKiller_ in forum Fine Art
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: December 7th, 2006, 01:10 AM
  4. Art: seek help to buy skull or skeleton to study anatomy
    By peichen in forum Fine Art
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: December 22nd, 2005, 07:28 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Designed by The Coldest Water, we build the coldest best water bottles, ice packs and best pillows.