Art: First Animation Attempt
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  1. #1
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    First Animation Attempt

    Hello. c:
    So, here's my first animation attempt. I'm sure it has tons and tons of mistakes, but it was fun to do and I learned quite a bit. Originally it was 12 fps, but I bumped it up to 24 since I was reading that's what film runs at...so figured I should get used to it, haha.

    Basically this was a test to see if I had the patience for animation, which I do, so if I get into a good art college this fall I'll be taking classes in it for sure~ -excited-

    But even if I don't I can keep self-teaching myself!



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    Good Work

    Nice work, it's better than I could have done Very smooth animation, and the movements are quite realistic.
    Not being a professional there's not much that I can point out that may be lacking XD To me this seems to be quite a nice walk cycle, good work.

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  3. #3
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    Dude, you're off to an awesome start! I like the design you used.

    You were..half correct in terms of using 12FPS. Film is played at 24FPS. Animation is often shot on twos (one drawing held for two exposures), so it effectively becomes 12FPS. Animation is still shot at 24FPS because with some extremely fast movements or with camera moves, the characters have to be animated on ones.

    So review:

    Ones=drawings that are only exposed for one frame
    twos=drawings that are exposed for two frames

    Now on to the nitty gritty:

    Good:

    interesting design.
    giving the character an attitude (although you will learn a 'mechanical walk' if you study animation in school, how a character walks is informed by who they are and how they feel.)
    Although you haven't drawn through, it looks like you got that hip movement working nicely.

    Needs work:

    You're form/volume is shifting. This just takes practice, and is often the reason why animators will work with a rough form-based version. His legs especially change length.

    Since you meant for this to be 12FPS, and this really should be on two's...using http://www.convertfiles.com/ I downloaded the file as a quicktime so I could play it half speed. The pace you have should be a walk. However, the gait you are animating is a trot.

    Most animals use four gaits:

    Walk
    Trot
    canter (cats are one of the few animals that don't use this gait)
    gallop

    A walk is a 'four beat' cycle. That means each foot hits the ground at a distinct and seperate moment. An animal will usually step off with a rear foot first from a stopped position. In this case, I'm going to start with the Right Hind.

    beats as follows:
    1. Right Hind
    2. Right Front
    3. Left Hind
    4. Left Front

    The hind feet will land almost overlapping where the front feet were. I even found a link!



    A trot is a two-beat gait, which is what you've used. With a trot there is a period where all four feet are off the ground between each beat. i.e., rf/lh, air, lf/rh, air, and so on.

    Now I'm probably getting a little more involved than what's needed here, so I'm going to leave off the canter and gallop for now.

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    slow down the timing and work on the tail

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    Wow, thanks for the extremely helpful crits! I was having a ton of problems with this, mainly because it kept limping. At one point I had 25 frames but the final was 18. I didn't know about the ones and twos, so I'll keep that in mind for next time.

    That video was awesome. Sprinting looks so fun to draw!
    I was attempting to keep everything the same size by using a grid, but it didn't work so well. Is there a better way to do it, or just practice tons and tons? :0

    @Relski: I will! My other friend pointed out that it changes sizes, so I need to watch for that.

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    @Fuzzy
    the tail? err i mean work by making it flow nicely. tails move like a cloth. google up some tail movements

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    Shark:

    The limping is probably caused by a spacing issue. The space /between/ your drawings will determine how slow or fast something is moving. It's possible you had a few drawings on one step close together then a big gap in spacing.

    As for keeping forms and volumes, a large part of it is indeed practice. Practice combined with knowledge of anatomy and form. I think the grid is an interesting idea, but I'm not sure how helpful it would be in the long run because a grid only represents the y and x axis. Even though animators draw on a two-dimensional plane, they try to give a three-dimensional depth by using the 'z' axis. (If you hae a character running towards you, they would get larger. This is the 'z' axis.)

    As for drawing:. Some people like to break down the forms when they do a rough pass. Others will do an armature. Some will do a gesture and correct as they go along. Part of the process is finding something that works for you. And the great thing about making mistakes is that you learn from them!

    This is a great clip where Glen Keane is talking about Freddie Moore and Ollie Johnston's animation/drawings.




    And, uh. Tails move like cloth? I'm going to admit I'm confused. Can you be a little more clear, Relski? Many animals have bones that are present in the tail, giving them a structure cloth doesn't have.

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    oh geez, sorry i've been animating with some clothes this days
    make the tail more of a WAVE

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_uvp4714JJx...8side%2529.gif

    sorry for just giving a link but look at sample of four-legged animal (it's exaggerated coz it's disney like)
    preston blair's book is awesome.

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