Color Pencils - Proper Techniques ?
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    Color Pencils - Proper Techniques ?

    I bought a 48 Pencil Set of Faber Castell Color Pencils and Also a box of Soft Pastels.

    Please guide me on good techniques for getting great results from coloured pencils. By techniques I mean, Blending, choosing colours, minimizing waste of color and paper, and how to protect the drawing from being smudged.

    I bought Pastels just because of curiosity about the material. However if I like the results I may use them as mixed media but as they are too delicate to be used regularly and limited colour range I may not use them as my primary colour media.

    One important point is I am learning traditional drawing, Painting etc as an entry point into digital painting, leading to concept art Environments. Since I want to avoid straining my eyes on PC screen just to lean little things, Will it help to get skilled in traditional will make it quicker to get desired results from digital media ?

    Last edited by NajamQ; March 7th, 2011 at 06:57 AM.
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    You should start of light then go dark. And layer the colors. Before you layer different color you should layer them on a different sheet of paper to see how the affect each other. And to blend you can you Tortillions. You can blend them like you would with graphite.

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    That's uh, kinda lot to ask. Wouldn't it be more helpful if we just downloaded all our art experience from our brains to your brains so all work could be skipped?

    I would suggest you to go to a library and borrow some traditional colouring technique books aimed for this, as well as colour theory to help choosing colours and start testing things. Try different blending ways on your own to see what is more comfortable and what works with your pencils, try different papers, colours, etc. If you find yourself smudging, try different hand positions, having paper under your hand, maybe light cotton glove on your drawing hand? Experiment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TinyBird View Post
    That's uh, kinda lot to ask. Wouldn't it be more helpful if we just downloaded all our art experience from our brains to your brains so all work could be skipped?

    I would suggest you to go to a library and borrow some traditional colouring technique books aimed for this, as well as colour theory to help choosing colours and start testing things. Try different blending ways on your own to see what is more comfortable and what works with your pencils, try different papers, colours, etc. If you find yourself smudging, try different hand positions, having paper under your hand, maybe light cotton glove on your drawing hand? Experiment.
    Actually that's the beauty of asking the experienced people. It saves you a lot from making mistakes yourself and spending time correcting them, Why not instead learn from experts. Why are teachers for when a student can do everything himself .

    Well, Since I have been trying hard to get some results from digital media but honestly I felt that I lack the basic knowledge, Because Digital media uses same fundamentals as traditional paintings/drawings do. So I know a bit of colour theory but never actually tried to implement it on paper.

    Thanks for your input.

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    I've never had too much trouble with color pencils smudging - they have such a high binder/wax content they're not like drier media. Like TinyBird said just try a lot of different stuff. There are a lot of books on color pencil techniques specifically which will give you a lot more direct advice and ideas than we could ever offer here. That's what the books are for!

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    Go get one of Bet Borgeson's books. http://www.borgesonstudio.com/books.htm That should be enough to teach you the basics of coloured pencil as a medium, the rest you can figure out on your own.

    Quote Originally Posted by NajamQ
    minimizing waste of color and paper
    NO NO NO NO! This is a terrible attitude to approach art with. It's ALL a waste of colour and paper, for years and years and years. This kind of thinking makes you reluctant to experiment and will result in you stunting your learning. Just buy goddamn cheap recycled printing paper, accept that you are going to be a paper-wasting machine for the next 10 years and get on with it. Coloured pencils take a long time to wear down and you're likely only going to have to replace your favourite colours (unless you're in the habit of dropping them and breaking the leads). Don't worry about that either.

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    Quote Originally Posted by vineris View Post
    Go get one of Bet Borgeson's books. http://www.borgesonstudio.com/books.htm That should be enough to teach you the basics of coloured pencil as a medium, the rest you can figure out on your own.



    NO NO NO NO! This is a terrible attitude to approach art with. It's ALL a waste of colour and paper, for years and years and years. This kind of thinking makes you reluctant to experiment and will result in you stunting your learning. Just buy goddamn cheap recycled printing paper, accept that you are going to be a paper-wasting machine for the next 10 years and get on with it. Coloured pencils take a long time to wear down and you're likely only going to have to replace your favourite colours (unless you're in the habit of dropping them and breaking the leads). Don't worry about that either.
    Thanks! for guiding me on right thought process. I will surely get back to practice with a less restrained mind.

    Pencils are cheap anyway and so is the paper. So I should not be worried about waste of money which for me is bit of a concern. Just I need guidance on doing the right practice instead of beating about the bush.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JeffX99 View Post
    I've never had too much trouble with color pencils smudging - they have such a high binder/wax content they're not like drier media. Like TinyBird said just try a lot of different stuff. There are a lot of books on color pencil techniques specifically which will give you a lot more direct advice and ideas than we could ever offer here. That's what the books are for!
    Thanks! Jeff, Always appreciate your input.

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    Serious coloured pencil blending be a very tedious process. I believe the pros will lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour blend it in, and on and on and on. Prepare yourself for a good exercise in patience.

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    Serious coloured pencil blending be a very tedious process. I believe the pros will lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour blend it in, and on and on and on. Prepare yourself for a good exercise in patience.

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    And then God said, "Let us make man in our likeness and our image. Let us make him ridiculously hard to draw so that poor artists everywhere will have to spend 10,000+ hours failing repeatedly before they can begin to capture the form and likeness onto a two-dimensional surface." And there was man. And it was good. And artists everywhere lost their minds.
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    Quote Originally Posted by manlybrian View Post
    Serious coloured pencil blending be a very tedious process. I believe the pros will lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour, blend it in, lightly colour blend it in, and on and on and on. Prepare yourself for a good exercise in patience.
    I don't blend. Light layers of colour do the job without becoming a smeared mess.

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    This thread is exactly what I came here to look for. I'm beginning to veer away from digital colour and go back to traditional media to break my worrying dependancy on my tablet.

    Also, what has reaffirmed this for me was finding the picture I have attached. I always loved pencil crayons, but I was wondering how much use they see or how seriously they are taken by pros.

    This was apparently done in colour pencils on a bristol board by Howard David Johnson.

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