What's the difference between Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator?
 
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  1. #1
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    What's the difference between Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator?

    I am an amateur comic book artist and I need to learn to color my comics, but I don't know which software I should get. Should I get Adobe Photoshop, or Adobe Illustrator? What is the difference between the two programs?

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    Photoshop is primarily a raster bitmap editor.
    Illustrator is primarily a vector graphics editor.

    Also, they are spelled different.

    Anyways, bitmap raster graphics have to do with the fact that images are made up of pixels. Think of a photo you take of your friend. If you zoom in, there is a grid of pixels, and each has a unique color. When you zoom back out, it can make up a highly detailed image. This is something raster images excel at.

    A vector graphic, on the other hand, is merely mathematical information. If you want to create a line, it maps things like the starting point of the line, the end coordinates, attributes of that line such as thickness, etc. As you scale that image up, it merely provides match to infinitely redraw the image to its new scale. This is known as being "resolution independent". Generally, vector images aren't as detailed as bitmaps, but people have done impressive work with them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AegisKleais View Post
    Photoshop is primarily a raster bitmap editor.
    Illustrator is primarily a vector graphics editor.

    Also, they are spelled different.

    Anyways, bitmap raster graphics have to do with the fact that images are made up of pixels. Think of a photo you take of your friend. If you zoom in, there is a grid of pixels, and each has a unique color. When you zoom back out, it can make up a highly detailed image. This is something raster images excel at.

    A vector graphic, on the other hand, is merely mathematical information. If you want to create a line, it maps things like the starting point of the line, the end coordinates, attributes of that line such as thickness, etc. As you scale that image up, it merely provides match to infinitely redraw the image to its new scale. This is known as being "resolution independent". Generally, vector images aren't as detailed as bitmaps, but people have done impressive work with them.
    Thank you for taking the time to respond. Which one would be best for a comic book artist? They both seem to have benefits, but I can't figure out which would be best for a comic book artist.

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    Either would work, but if I had to take a guess, I'd say you'll do better with Illustrator. Though it's a bit harder to learn (all tools take time to master), the fact that it can create crisp clean, resolution-independent lines would be a plus.

    Photoshop has a limited amount of vector creation tools (and Illustrator has a limited amount of raster tools), but Adobe has still turned a deaf ear to adding even basic shared control between the apps. For example, a great feature when using the Pen tool in AI is to hold down the SPACEBAR as you are putting down anchor points, and it will allow you to move that anchor point on the fly as you place it. A very simply (and useful) feature, and even in PS CS5, Adobe has chosen not to add this to PS' Pen tool.

    AI CS5 has made significant leaps and bounds; I think it'll do you a solid for doing comic book art.

    "Doing something half-assed more than once just makes you more of an ass."
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  8. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by AegisKleais View Post
    Either would work, but if I had to take a guess, I'd say you'll do better with Illustrator. Though it's a bit harder to learn (all tools take time to master), the fact that it can create crisp clean, resolution-independent lines would be a plus.

    Photoshop has a limited amount of vector creation tools (and Illustrator has a limited amount of raster tools), but Adobe has still turned a deaf ear to adding even basic shared control between the apps. For example, a great feature when using the Pen tool in AI is to hold down the SPACEBAR as you are putting down anchor points, and it will allow you to move that anchor point on the fly as you place it. A very simply (and useful) feature, and even in PS CS5, Adobe has chosen not to add this to PS' Pen tool.

    AI CS5 has made significant leaps and bounds; I think it'll do you a solid for doing comic book art.
    Thank you, AegisKleais, that's what I wanted to know. If I'm plunking down over $600 in cold U.S. currency, I want to make sure I know that I'm getting the correct version for my needs as a comic book artist.

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    The best would be to try out both programs. I think you can download and use both for one month. Illustrator works can look too clean (lines, colors), very digital and photoshop can get closer to natural mediums. It depends on what kind of final look you want.

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  10. #8
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    Do yourself a favor. Download the fully functional 30 day trial from Adobe first. It's the best way to "Try before you Buy"

    "Doing something half-assed more than once just makes you more of an ass."
    ●● I7 920 2.67GHz QUAD ●● 12GB DDR3 ●● GTX285 OC ●● WINDOWS 7 PRO X64 ●● ADOBE CS5 ●● CINTIQ 21UX ●●
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