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  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by AegisKleais
    The only point I mean to imply (to dispel any confusion) is that when it comes to inspiration, an actual canvas vs. a digital canvas bears no difference to me.

    It seems like there may have been a miscommunication between us (these things happen). If you're referring to the actual art's 3D presence in reality vs. the 2D flat portrayal in a monitor, I'm apt to follow your core belief here.
    This is where it should have ended from what I can tell. If the goal is really to teach, to spread knowledge, this is where it was accomplished and acknowledged - in whatever way. Even if he didn't take the time to pedal all the way back and beg forgiveness, at this point, he's revoked his statement - or at least stated a change of opinion. The situation changed again right here. And yet more statements kept coming in on top of dpaint's. Because people aren't trying to simply share knowledge. It's the Internet, everyone having to get their own version of correction, or sarcastic comment into the fray - they've got to teach a lesson of "humility" as you put it. Unfortunately, this happens a lot. If everyone's fine with jumping on board to teach random people "humility" - even at the cost of insulting people themselves...fine, by all means. Just don't try to play it off like you're being a friendly community member, gracing others with your teachings. The "teaching" part was accomplished a long time ago. By someone with far more experience. The rest of it was just people jumping on the bandwagon.

    (Oh, and uh...Aegis, don't mean to be essentially spouting off all these responses and judgements about you, when I'm not even talking to you. Hopefully you don't take offense to any of this, not my intention, they're just my observations.)

    ...god damn you, Internet.

    Last edited by Two Listen; February 22nd, 2011 at 07:20 PM.
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  4. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by AegisKleais View Post
    But what makes this a right vs. wrong topic? How can something so subjective as how impressed a person is by the medium through which they view their art have a definitive right and wrong side to it?

    If this is upsetting someone, can you tell me in a more neutral point what exactly about it is angering? I have a sneaking suspicion that this is just a mis-communication.
    I'll see if I can...and I'll even try to be brief. A lot has been said - and I even agree with most of it...from both sides. I think the crux of the issue is this (and why people are quite passionate about it): physical art/paintings in person are a completely different experience than reproductions or images on a monitor. Fact. "Real paintings" respond differently in different lighting conditions, viewing angles and distances. Fact. The scale of paintings has a real effect on the viewer as well. Fact.

    Most artists, and non-artist "appreciators" alike, would agree that the above facts are a major part of the appeal of visual art.

    The problem seems to me you are basically discounting one of the primary experiences of a vast number of artists, patrons and art history in general, and chalking it up to your "opinion", which seems to lack any significant experience in the subject at hand. I don't really know of course, perhaps you've visited many museums, stood in front of great works and not been moved at all. I realize you've said, numerous times, that your opinion can change, and probably will, that's cool - I just think people would like to hear, "Yeah, you're probably right, I don't really understand it right now but I'll take your word for it".

    Basically it's already been said, and I don't know if my two cents added any clarity. Just be open and willing to grow and explore - that is really what I think everyone just wants for you - believe it or not I think they're trying to help - but you tend to lock into a defensive position and the "discussion" shifts to semantics and becomes personal.

    Anyway, that's all I really have...except to relate this little story...a few years ago I went down to see a Sargent exhibit...stepped into one of the smaller, side portrait galleries to admire a classic life-size portrait...I realized someone else had entered and sort of shifted a bit to allow them by...I turned to acknowledge them and IT WAS A FUCKING PAINTING! Oh, I also cried when I saw the Italian marble quarry paintings.

    What would Caravaggio do?
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  6. #63
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    I would like to politely request the discussion return to the ways the internet has changed the study of art for students as well as the professional field of art, along with where art is going from here. I think we've been over viewing paintings physically versus their representation on a screen quite thoroughly.

    Thanks all for your participation.

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  7. #64
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    I agree with you eyestrain, if anyone wants to discuss with me for clarification, please PM me and I'll gladly speak with you in private. My apologies to the OP if this provided information you were not particularly looking for.

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  8. #65
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    No, this is also part of the discussion, there are just a lot of things I hope to hear about. As someone who was raised on the internet my experience, I assume, is very different than artists who grew up or learned without it, and I would very much like to hear their experience (as well as the opinions of those who grew up with the internet as to whether or not their experience has been enjoyable, useful, beneficial, or not).

    Personally I want to think about what will be, and wonder what you all think.

    Specific topics I wonder what you think of-
    Artists discovering they are artists through the internet

    Art as a social activity (on and offline)

    Mainstream discovery of incredible artists (using a digital canvas)

    Derivative art communities (fanart, disney/anime/other style)

    Android Jones' physical digital gallery Illuminotic ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRB9dpa1Jio )

    and a question- Has the internet been beneficial to art as a whole, or detracted from it?

    Trying not to pigeonhole the conversation but realize being very vague might not lead everyone to what I am thinking of.

    Last edited by eyestrain; February 24th, 2011 at 03:57 AM.
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  9. #66
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    Well the internet has been beneficial to me as an artist, because withouth it, and without art communities such as this one, I would've never heard about the influential people and their works, for example Loomis and Bridgeman.
    Therefore I would've never learned the fundamentals of drawing and painting, thus making it almost impossible for me to improve.
    Nor would I have gotten the critiques or encouragement necessary for me to keep on pushing myself.

    (You see I grew up in a country where art wasnt as valued, and without a market like here in North America, so beign an artist or learning the tools to become a succesful one would've been practically impossible there. Luckily enough I had the internet and cgsociety's forums)

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  10. #67
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    Even though I think art is always valued to some degree in any community (even our 1600 pop town in the mountains had an art gallery, although it was exclusively landscapes and wildlife art) I feel the same way.

    Something I just thought of. I did have opportunities to take art classes in primary school, but was never interested in "realism" or art history as a young person. I only wanted to draw my own stories in "my style".
    I think if I hadn't had online communities where that was appreciated I may have stopped drawing and wouldn't have reached the maturity to try and branch out. It may have just fizzled as a hobby and not developed into a passion.
    Maybe.

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