high school art

Join 500,000+ Artists

Its' free and it takes less than 10 seconds!

Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: high school art

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    Exclamation high school art

    Hey guys

    I'm reasonably new to these forums but I've lurked around several threads from time to time.

    I wanted to ask you guys your opinion or advice on what I am currently experiencing. I'm taking art class in my senior year of high school and I'm not really enjoying it.

    I've always loved drawing fantasy and sci-fi art in my own time but I'm really struggling to find high school art fun and enjoyable. We are always experimenting with a different medium every lesson and given a homework project to complete, often vague in description and as a 70 minute lesson doesn't go indepth in to a medium enough, I find I am constantly looking at 'homework projects' with a what the hell am I supposed to do mentality?

    In class our teacher tells us to find a way to interpret the work and personalize it so that it is a reflection of our perception and how we see the piece. I try adding a sci-fi or fantasy drawing element to a project and got told off for mixing mediums and for my personal involvement in it not seeming relevant...

    I love art and I'm obsessed with drawing anything and everything I can get my hands on outside of school, I'm steadily filling up a sketchbook full of pictures and have developed a small group of people on facebook and at school who I constantly show ideas and pieces to, they are all impressed and keep me motivated to continue working in my own time.

    I'm finding high school art boring, uninspiring and in some ways childish. I don't mean in anyway to say that I'm better then what the curriculum teaches or that I'm lazy but I just feel as though the projects we are required to do lock us into a specific medium without any creative outlet for our personal expression.

    A piece I just finished had to be an ink grid relating to urban environments. I'm currently working on a piece that is a representation of our journey home. I was unclear of what that meant, was it something deeper or just literally, what journey is it to get home from school? I asked the teacher and she held up an example of a girl from our class.

    The example was a section of a roadmap (which we [have] to use in the piece) but she had cut a hole out and drawn in an eye. When I questioned the significance of the eye, the teacher asked me to ask the student who drew it. I didn't want to be rude so I waited until the end of class and asked her what the picture was about, she told me she drew the eye in because the roadmap journey is how she 'see's' the journey home, she seemed confused when she said this like she was making something up on the spot.

    We also took some time to use bleach on various colored inks, all of which produced a really cool rust effect but so what? We had to draw an image out of the rust effect in a collage. The collage looked like something I had done in pre-school...

    Talking with artists on deviantART who I aspire to be like one day, they told me to practice all in my own time and refine my own skills. I learned that if I could take a figure drawing class at school or in my own time, I would benefit greatly. I don't think my school would ever offer figure drawing, especially if it involved nude models.

    I don't know if I just need to shut up and deal with it or if anyone can offer some advice or relate to what I'm currently thinking. I want to repeat I don't feel like I am better then any of the other students, nor do I think my teacher is bad but I often find myself questioning the reasoning for gluing squares to a page or bleching away inks when I'm so inspired and excited by the prospect of finishing a sci-fi or fantasy piece such as a knight or bionic commando.



    ps. I wrote a better one that doesn't make me sound stuck up but I clicked submit and it crashed my browser :/ so i'm tired and kinda frustrated

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  


  2. Hide this ad by registering as a member
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    33
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 9 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Well, as you are a senior.. it's very likely your community college would offer life drawing. You may just need to exercise patience, do your assignments and do what you feel will most benefit you outside of that until you can take more in-depth classes with a teacher who you like.

    The rest I cannot comment on, but check to see if your local CC has life drawing classes. Your school may have a program that allows you to study at the community college while still in high school, especially since you are a senior and while I have no experience in either kinds of schools.. I do know that they tend to offer those sorts of things.

    Good luck

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. The Following User Says Thank You to Lotuschild For This Useful Post:


  5. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Hey lotus

    Thanks for the advice, I'm looking at pursuing a BFA in Illustration after school so I will scope out whats available in my area.

    If anyone else has advice on how to make high school art fun then please let me know! Any advice is welcomed

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  6. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Um, yeah, dunno what to tell you about how to salvage the high school class, doesn't sound like a terribly useful class...

    I was home-schooled so I skipped all that (thankfully.) Instead I took a few community college classes and found a life drawing class at a local gallery. They were all pretty good, no-nonsense, practical classes. I also found an uninstructed life-drawing group which was great for getting some real practice and building up a life-drawing portfolio. Plus I spent a summer at an arts camp that had cool classes like stone carving and animation, that was fun, especially mingling with other kids interested in art. So those are all types of things you could look for that might be more useful than your high school class...

    Plus, hey, it counts as "extra-curricular activities" on your college application. Win-win.

    I also took one CAD class though the local high school, but it was one of their vocational classes for adults... If your school has any continuing-ed/adult vocational classes like that, there might be some better options there than what you get in the generic high school art class? Something to check, anyway.

    A lot of art schools have pre-college summer programs, too. Could be worth looking at.

    Truth be told though, a LOT of my pre-college art education was just me practicing on my own, constantly... And we didn't even have internet. Man, I would have killed for access to art communities back then...

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #5
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,670 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Thallion View Post
    If anyone else has advice on how to make high school art fun then please let me know!
    Don't try to make it into something that it isn't. Your teachers can only teach what they know, and honestly, most HS art teachers don't know much about the kind of art you like. That doesn't mean you can't learn anything from them, it just means what you can learn is probably something different than what you were expecting when you signed up for the class. The person in charge of making it fun is you. Take the assignments and play with them. Your challenge is to find ways of expressing yourself without shoehorning in some random fantasy or sci-fi element. Because trust me, if you think getting an illustration degree is all about drawing dragons and robots, you've got another thing coming.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    The land of fast cars and loud guitars.
    Posts
    94
    Thanks
    55
    Thanked 24 Times in 16 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I just finished a class where I experienced some issues similar to yours, namely, jumping from one completely new technique/medium to another and being expected to do something with it without any practice or experience. That can be a little frustrating, but it can also be liberating. You aren't expected to do anything impressive with a new technique, so you can just let go and try to have fun with it. Beyond that, I just figured, okay, I don't get this and it doesn't appeal to me, but one day down the road I may want to accomplish something and this technique or medium may be the perfect solution, so it's a good tool to at least be introduced to. Cheers.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by QueenGwenevere View Post
    Um, yeah, dunno what to tell you about how to salvage the high school class, doesn't sound like a terribly useful class...

    I was home-schooled so I skipped all that (thankfully.) Instead I took a few community college classes and found a life drawing class at a local gallery. They were all pretty good, no-nonsense, practical classes. I also found an uninstructed life-drawing group which was great for getting some real practice and building up a life-drawing portfolio. Plus I spent a summer at an arts camp that had cool classes like stone carving and animation, that was fun, especially mingling with other kids interested in art. So those are all types of things you could look for that might be more useful than your high school class...

    Plus, hey, it counts as "extra-curricular activities" on your college application. Win-win.

    I also took one CAD class though the local high school, but it was one of their vocational classes for adults... If your school has any continuing-ed/adult vocational classes like that, there might be some better options there than what you get in the generic high school art class? Something to check, anyway.

    A lot of art schools have pre-college summer programs, too. Could be worth looking at.

    Truth be told though, a LOT of my pre-college art education was just me practicing on my own, constantly... And we didn't even have internet. Man, I would have killed for access to art communities back then...
    Ah thanks heaps for the tips. I'll definitely check out the possibility of summer stuff!

    Don't try to make it into something that it isn't. Your teachers can only teach what they know, and honestly, most HS art teachers don't know much about the kind of art you like. That doesn't mean you can't learn anything from them, it just means what you can learn is probably something different than what you were expecting when you signed up for the class. The person in charge of making it fun is you. Take the assignments and play with them. Your challenge is to find ways of expressing yourself without shoehorning in some random fantasy or sci-fi element. Because trust me, if you think getting an illustration degree is all about drawing dragons and robots, you've got another thing coming.
    I understand how my hobby of drawing sci-fi and fantasy could be taken as what I think illustration would be about :p

    I am not just into drawing that sort of stuff, it's currently what I spend a bit of my time doing when I don't have school work but I understand that art school won't be all dragons and elves.

    I just finished a class where I experienced some issues similar to yours, namely, jumping from one completely new technique/medium to another and being expected to do something with it without any practice or experience. That can be a little frustrating, but it can also be liberating. You aren't expected to do anything impressive with a new technique, so you can just let go and try to have fun with it. Beyond that, I just figured, okay, I don't get this and it doesn't appeal to me, but one day down the road I may want to accomplish something and this technique or medium may be the perfect solution, so it's a good tool to at least be introduced to. Cheers.
    Aha! The main problem with the class is that we jump from medium to medium so fast without any practice so it's not very clear how we are supposed to do these projects because we don't work with the medium long enough to understand the majority of the fundamental concepts. It is a mentality though so I suppose I'll just try to find a fun way to go about doing them

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  11. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Sunshine State
    Posts
    1,598
    Thanks
    1,106
    Thanked 226 Times in 174 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Your teacher most likely has decided to wet your feet in many different things, which is great. At least you're getting a basic instruction of how to handle each medium. Most people don't even get that. A puddle here, a puddle there; you're hopping around. Nobody expects you to take any of them anywhere...yet.

    It's about being exposed to things, which is arguably more important than what your teacher could otherwise do in the limited time he/she probably has.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by drd View Post
    Your teacher most likely has decided to wet your feet in many different things, which is great. At least you're getting a basic instruction of how to handle each medium. Most people don't even get that. A puddle here, a puddle there; you're hopping around. Nobody expects you to take any of them anywhere...yet.

    It's about being exposed to things, which is arguably more important than what your teacher could otherwise do in the limited time he/she probably has.
    true :p i just feel a little harsh done by knowing that our senior marks are based off 'wetting our feet' I can understand the reasoning behind sampling all different types, most people haven't decided what they want to do after school either.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  13. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    33
    Thanks
    5
    Thanked 9 Times in 5 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by drd View Post
    Your teacher most likely has decided to wet your feet in many different things, which is great. At least you're getting a basic instruction of how to handle each medium. Most people don't even get that. A puddle here, a puddle there; you're hopping around. Nobody expects you to take any of them anywhere...yet.

    It's about being exposed to things, which is arguably more important than what your teacher could otherwise do in the limited time he/she probably has.
    Yes. This. I wish I had jumped in more puddles. Instead I'm having to seek them out when I'm timid and feel behind the rest of my age group because I never took any art in school. I've toyed with a very small amount of traditional mediums without any direction and I have to pay in full for whatever I do try..which is a real bummer if I end up hating the medium.

    But I too was mostly homeschooled, I had friends who did the College credits thing, and there was a life drawing group near me but I had 0 interest in art then, I went to keep my friend company and couldn't get into it. Oh how things have changed. You can try stopping by a local art store and seeing if they have a bulletin board of any kind, search for one in your area if you can't find one at the CC.

    My problem right now is that the only one here is at the CC and there are tons of people who want one, but no one willing to make it happen. So to the CC I go.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    135
    Thanks
    20
    Thanked 29 Times in 26 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I failed high-school art out of boredom for the curriculum, and I fully believe that there are much better ways to learn the intricacies of art then what they have to offer. Which, by my standards, is all well and good - I'm fine with that some people may like it, but I never will and I can see why the OP doesn't, either.

    However, I understand that you don't go there to get better at art - that's much better done on your own - you go there to learn the breadth and depth of art, it's medium, how it was conceived through history. You go there to learn about art, not to magically learn art itself. I can respect that. I just don't want to do that.

    However, I really wish that people wouldn't just make up "deep" meanings for their art - it only really seems to happen during high-school, and it seems cheap. Might just be me.

    Sketchbook of the Now|Visual Lovemaking|Abominables
    I do that thing where you scalp cars-salesmen and call it art.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    68
    Thanks
    30
    Thanked 33 Times in 27 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    The exciting parts of drawing are completely separate from whatever medium you might me using. Honestly, I can't help but feel that it cultivates an attitude very inimical to real learning when teachers insist on experimental media. I'm in college and I see seniors in life drawing class who still lack any of the fundamental understanding requisite in interpreting the exciting slice of nature before them, because they've been convinced that graphite is lame. I've decided that art and creativity are impossible to contrive...when you execute a convention of visual expression with enough control and conviction, people will discover "truth " within it, and any instrument which you decide to use will be operate on your terms, guided by your knowledge.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    308
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 126 Times in 91 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    art is what you make it generally, so like many ppl suggested, try and make each project personal in some way. Im a freshman in college pursuing a bachelors in illustration, and there are STILL classes where I get assignments that I have noooo clue how its supposed to be relevant to my major. But not everything has to be relevant, its more about covering a lot of different bases before jumping into a single minded way of thinking. Some of the stuff I did this semester was not exactly something I would ever see myself making but I still found it enjoyable to try something new.

    And as far as figure drawing goes, don't expect it in high school. I'd suggest checking out summer programs at colleges. Many have art classes specifically for high schoolers interested in higher art education. Sometimes art museums or community learning centers offer figure drawing classes (even if you just go on your own to a museum and sketch statues its very beneficial)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Boston, MA
    Posts
    308
    Thanks
    23
    Thanked 126 Times in 91 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    art is what you make it generally, so like many ppl suggested, try and make each project personal in some way. Im a freshman in college pursuing a bachelors in illustration, and there are STILL classes where I get assignments that I have noooo clue how its supposed to be relevant to my major. But not everything has to be relevant, its more about covering a lot of different bases before jumping into a single minded way of thinking. Some of the stuff I did this semester was not exactly something I would ever see myself making but I still found it enjoyable to try something new.

    And as far as figure drawing goes, don't expect it in high school. I'd suggest checking out summer programs at colleges. Many have art classes specifically for high schoolers interested in higher art education. Sometimes art museums or community learning centers offer figure drawing classes (even if you just go on your own to a museum and sketch statues its very beneficial)

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  18. #15
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Lintire View Post
    I failed high-school art out of boredom for the curriculum, and I fully believe that there are much better ways to learn the intricacies of art then what they have to offer. Which, by my standards, is all well and good - I'm fine with that some people may like it, but I never will and I can see why the OP doesn't, either.

    However, I understand that you don't go there to get better at art - that's much better done on your own - you go there to learn the breadth and depth of art, it's medium, how it was conceived through history. You go there to learn about art, not to magically learn art itself. I can respect that. I just don't want to do that.

    However, I really wish that people wouldn't just make up "deep" meanings for their art - it only really seems to happen during high-school, and it seems cheap. Might just be me.
    Awesome! Someone with an almost identical perspective as my own

    I 100% agree about the intent you say about high school art and I also respect what they are trying to do but I also don't want to do that I'm willing to suck it up :p

    I have to agree also with the idea that people making up deep meanings for their art is both annoying and stupid. We experiment with a medium for about 40 minutes and suddenly they are talking about the medium and their art piece as though they have studied the medium for a year or two.

    In response to mediums and tools, I love my graphite pencil. I've been experimenting with its uses in my own time and love the very vague and mysterious lack of detail I draw in because I can conceal and leave the imagination up to the viewer through shading and the application of graphite.

    None of that in class either

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  19. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    28
    Thanks
    3
    Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    It sounds to me that you are in the wrong place.

    You should take up game arts.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  20. The Following User Says Thank You to h-edition For This Useful Post:


  21. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Bremerton, Washington
    Posts
    62
    Thanks
    6
    Thanked 11 Times in 4 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    high school art is generally boring. i got accepted into AP studio art here, but I turned her down. unless you go to an art high school, its better to learn on your own. At least in my opinion.

    I feel less rushed to complete things. i don't deal with crappy communal materials. and it feels less like work to me.

    http://www.conceptart.org/forums/sho...d.php?t=206799
    ^you should check out my sketchbook^
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  22. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    11
    Thanks
    1
    Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by h-edition View Post
    It sounds to me that you are in the wrong place.

    You should take up game arts.
    I do hope to get into the game industry but I'm not sure where a game art specific course would be available. I'm going to be in San Francisco next year so I suppose I could look around there.

    The ones I have found at the moment are dealing with a lot of modeling and animation in which I have no interest. I'm hoping to get into concept art or character art

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 0

There are no members to list at the moment.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
  • 424,149 Artists
  • 3,599,276 Artist Posts
  • 32,941 Sketchbooks
  • 54 New Art Jobs
Art Workshop Discount Inside
Register

Developed Actively by vBSocial.com
The Art Department
SpringOfSea's Sketchbook