Lucian Freud: SBS2 TV, 3 February 2011, 8:30 to 9:50 pm.
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Thread: Lucian Freud: SBS2 TV, 3 February 2011, 8:30 to 9:50 pm.

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    Lucian Freud: SBS2 TV, 3 February 2011, 8:30 to 9:50 pm.

    LUCIAN FREUD

    In our world of the knowledge explosion and burgeoning information far beyond the capacity of any ordinary mortal to keep up on more than a sliver, a small portion, of it all, I was not surprised when yet another artist--unknown to me--was given a TV bio-pic1 last night. Lucian Freud, now 89, has been at the game of life more than two decades than I. He has gained a pre-eminence among British artists, a celebrity status, far beyond anything I will achieve even if I live to be a centenarian.–Ron Price with thanks to SBS2 TV, 3 February 2011, 8:30 to 9:50 pm.

    You had your first solo exhibition
    the year I was born, Lucian, and
    you travelled to Paris the year I
    travelled to Burlington and the
    same year as the opening of the
    2nd Seven Year Plan: 1946-1953.

    You were championed in and
    contributed to Patrick Swift’s
    X magazine which ran from ‘59
    to ’62 just as I was entering the
    Baha’i Faith and beginning my
    pioneer-life for the Canadian
    Baha’i community in Ontario.

    In my years of association with
    this new world religion all the
    way back to the fifties you have
    been painting nudes to almost
    the complete exclusion of all-else.

    Your subject matter, Lucian, is
    autobiographical and so is all my
    writing. “It’s all to do with hope,
    memory, sensuality, involvement,”
    you once said—and I would add
    much more. The 4000 hours you
    spent on a series of paintings of
    your mother are equalled by the
    same number of hours on Baha’i
    history. I like to think, Lucian…
    that I too have had an omnivorous
    gaze but it translates my world into
    words not portraits. My tendency to
    socialize and play the raconteur is
    limited now by my bipolar disorder
    and I trust your tendency to father
    children is also limited now as well.(1)

    (1) Simon Edge, “LUCIAN FREUD THE LOTHARIO,” in Express.co.uk, Friday May 16, 2008. Freud is reputed to have fathered some 40 children.

    Ron Price
    4 February 2011

    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
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    I find Freud's work a peculiar beast. His eye for color is very good, though his awareness of form and structure can be wanting. He'd be just another skilled painter in my book, except for one thing.

    Freud's work is entirely devoid of any compassion.

    That's the only reason it stands out to my eye. It is close enough in technical and tactical approach to the classic and Impressionist art, but where these sought the beauty, the meaning and the fleeting moment's charm, Freud seems to strive to remove all scraps of that. He'll meticulously track flaws. Exaggerate imperfections. Focus on the unattractive. It's normal for an artist to be enticed by a form and the play of light on it, no matter how insignificant or pedestrian the object is. If successful, that can elevate a subject. Freud does the opposite; I can't get the feeling he likes anything in his subjects, but instead obsessively dissects them.

    This isn't just a lack of emotion in his work, it's like a black hole that sucks emotion out. When I look at Freud's work, I can't imagine the artist wanting to communicate anything but disgust with the world and people, if even that. It's the work of a person completely without empathy.

    I acknowledge his technical proficiency and his obsession, but I think he had wasted his talent on this cheap pettiness. Oh well.

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    Well put, Arenhaus. I'd agree with that assessment.

    I'll add that if his last name were Jones, IMO, he'd be nowhere.

    I was once on the receiving end of a critique so savagely nasty, I marched straight out of class to the office and changed my major (sketchbook).
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    I find myself agreeing with you on this arenhaus.
    The elevation of this kind of temperement in the British Art world mystifies me. Frank Aubach, Leon Kossof among the painters and people like Tracy Emin and Damien Hirst among the conceptual people. Hockney is of course the the vital exception.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
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    My Sketchbook

    And then God said, "Let us make man in our likeness and our image. Let us make him ridiculously hard to draw so that poor artists everywhere will have to spend 10,000+ hours failing repeatedly before they can begin to capture the form and likeness onto a two-dimensional surface." And there was man. And it was good. And artists everywhere lost their minds.
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    Cool Belated Thanks Folks

    Belated Thanks Folks for your responses---especially the art pieces. I can't believe it has been more than 3 months since I placed that initial item in this thread. Carry on gang and thanks.-Ron Price, Tasmania

    married for 46 years, a teacher for 35, a writer and editor for 14, and a Baha'i for 54(in 2013).
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bennett View Post
    I find myself agreeing with you on this arenhaus.
    The elevation of this kind of temperement in the British Art world mystifies me. Frank Aubach, Leon Kossof among the painters and people like Tracy Emin and Damien Hirst among the conceptual people. Hockney is of course the the vital exception.
    what temperament do you think kossoff and auerbach express?

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    Here's an excellent article that perfectly sums up my feelings on Freud:

    http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/...e-1484132.html

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    Yeah. I agree Freuds pretty overrated. I think in that case Jenny Saville does a much better job at pulling off that particular style.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

    Sketchy Link

    Portfolio
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    Quote Originally Posted by cro-magnon View Post
    what temperament do you think kossoff and auerbach express?
    Protestant puritanism.

    From Gegarin's point of view
    http://www.chrisbennettartist.co.uk/
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