How Develop Visual Library?
Join the #1 Art Workshop - LevelUpJoin Premium Art Workshop

Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: How Develop Visual Library?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    212
    Thanks
    27
    Thanked 56 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0

    How Develop Visual Library?

    Hello Everyone,

    I was reading Marko Djurdjevic's Wikipedia page, and it stated that he did not use references when making images but relied on a visual library in his mind developed through memorization. Jason chan said the same thing in one of his tutorials as well.

    I was wondering if anyone could share how to develop a visual library.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  2. #2
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    By doing a lot of drawing from life and references.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    787
    Thanks
    13
    Thanked 42 Times in 39 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Same thing JeffX99 said, plus you could build a literal visual library by saving references and images you find inspiring and keep them in your head after looking at them a lot? My visual library is on my iPod, I think I've got 2000 pictures on it, waaaaay more than the number of songs.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  4. #4
    Elwell's Avatar
    Elwell is offline Sticks Like Grim Death Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Hudson River valley, NY
    Posts
    16,212
    Thanks
    4,879
    Thanked 16,666 Times in 5,020 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Observe mindfully. Most people don't see 99.9% of what they see.


    Tristan Elwell
    **Finished Work Thread **Process Thread **Edges Tutorial

    Crash Course for Artists, Illustrators, and Cartoonists, NYC, the 2013 Edition!

    "Work is more fun than fun."
    -John Cale

    "Art is supposed to punch you in the brain, and it's supposed to stay punched."
    -Marc Maron
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  5. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Elwell For This Useful Post:


  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Jakarta, Indonesia
    Posts
    70
    Thanks
    18
    Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Practice a lot and let your hand memorize the shapes.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  7. #6
    JeffX99's Avatar
    JeffX99 is offline Registered User Level 17 Gladiator: Spartacus' Dimachaeri
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Northern California
    Posts
    5,234
    Thanks
    3,512
    Thanked 4,896 Times in 2,544 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Elwell View Post
    Observe mindfully. Most people don't see 99.9% of what they see.
    Yes...this is important and can be done all the time - not just when you are out painting or drawing. Look at things - shadows, is there color there? Light reflecting into them? What color are car windows, in this situation? Are they always teh same or does it depend on local situation? Building windows? What is the value on an asphalt road? What value is the sky? What if you compare it to something white?

    That kind of stuff...you can make a lot of discoveries everywhere which can bring more sensitivity to your work.

    What would Caravaggio do?
    _________________________

    Portfolio
    Plein Air
    Digital
    Still Life
    Sight Measuring
    Fundamentals
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  8. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to JeffX99 For This Useful Post:


  9. #7
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Gdansk, Poland
    Posts
    4,834
    Thanks
    887
    Thanked 1,568 Times in 754 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Here's some really old quote from Black frog back when he was commenting people's work in Crit section .

    Quote Originally Posted by the black frog View Post
    Don't just look at things... SEE them.

    As a daily exercise you should push your eye to "see" and analyse what you see rather than having it pass on front of you without really catching what will be usefull to you later in your drawing.

    Most people are surrounded by things all the time and come to you asking can you draw me a teapot or a bottle of vine or whatever... and they are gobsmacked when you can... Those things are surrounding them every day,!!! they are just blind to it. They see the concept of the teapot but they don't see THIS SPECIFIC teapot with what makes it unique.

    When you look at something, you should have the eye of someone who is trying to understand every aspect of the fabrication of it.
    What is the texture, color, shape, what makes it different from another specimen of the same species - that applies to everything and anything -
    It is tiresome at the beguining caus' we're not use to pay that much attention to what's around us, but it gets better with time... and You and up doing it in auto pilot after a while.


    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  10. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Farvus For This Useful Post:


  11. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Washington, US
    Posts
    1,194
    Thanks
    1,571
    Thanked 716 Times in 343 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Try drawing stuff from imagination/memory first and that should make you realize what you don't know about the subject. Then go research it and get the answers.

    I tried to draw some guns quite a while back and it dawned on me that I had no idea what a gun looked like. I even had the basic shape wrong! So I had to go get references and invent a few guns based on the things I saw. Now I have some of those things in my mental library, so if I tried to draw a gun I'd remember a few things I learned and be able to get it...sort of close.

    My Sketchbook

    And then God said, "Let us make man in our likeness and our image. Let us make him ridiculously hard to draw so that poor artists everywhere will have to spend 10,000+ hours failing repeatedly before they can begin to capture the form and likeness onto a two-dimensional surface." And there was man. And it was good. And artists everywhere lost their minds.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  12. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to manlybrian For This Useful Post:


  13. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,287
    Thanks
    219
    Thanked 167 Times in 106 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    I believe a majority of people think an artist's goal is to just see an image in their mind and then paint it. Building a visual library is basically just learning to draw similar figures and things after much repetition. Yeaahhhh, Jason Chan can draw out of his head very well, but he still uses reference, like MOST artist. You gotta ask yourself, "why?". Look at this post he did on Muddy Colors for example.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  14. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    SE London, UK
    Posts
    529
    Thanks
    125
    Thanked 147 Times in 123 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Yeah, it's really not rocket science but somehow we all look for an easy answer. Things I draw a lot, and have always draw a lot, come out looking good. Things I never draw do not. The only way to improve is by drawing more, preferably from life so you're not developing upon errors.

    I had to draw wolves for my last project, and I came out the other end not entirely confident with drawing them, but It certainly feels more natural to sketch their form than it did before.

    Sketchbook | Art Blog | Portfolio

    True progress means matching the world to the vision in our heads.
    But we always change the vision instead.
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  15. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    New York
    Posts
    212
    Thanks
    27
    Thanked 56 Times in 51 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Thanks for all the useful info guys,

    Another question I have in conjunction with this one is about drawing from life. I never really did a lot of drawing from life (except for the figure). And I had read somewhere that drawing say, a beetle from a photo doesn't end up sticking in your mind as much as it would drawing the actual beetle in front of you.

    Can anyone validate if this is true? Is it enough to draw from photos and books or should I make drawing still life drawing part of my daily practice?

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  16. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    New York, USA
    Posts
    2,337
    Thanks
    1,074
    Thanked 2,199 Times in 1,055 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mmortal Cintiq View Post
    Is it enough to draw from photos and books or should I make drawing still life drawing part of my daily practice?
    YES, you should be drawing from life! Trying to understand light and form from photos alone is difficult, and your sources will most likely be inaccurate and misleading. (Among many other reasons to draw from life...)

    Drawing from life may seem intimidating, but believe me, it makes everything easier to understand in the long run. And once you get into it, it can be a lot more fun than copying pictures, because you're making your own pictures - there's something exciting about making your own picture that never existed before, even if it sucks. (Well, I think so, anyway.)

    Doesn't even have to be figures at first if that seems too complicated, you can get started by drawing real stuff around the house or real stuff around your neighborhood... landscapes, furniture, trees, your shoes, anything really.

    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

  17. #13
    TinyBird's Avatar
    TinyBird is offline Why you gotta be an angry burd Level 16 Gladiator: Spartacus' Retiarii
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    HELLsinki, Finland
    Posts
    4,757
    Thanks
    338
    Thanked 2,656 Times in 1,619 Posts
    Follows
    0
    Following
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by mmortal Cintiq View Post
    And I had read somewhere that drawing say, a beetle from a photo doesn't end up sticking in your mind as much as it would drawing the actual beetle in front of you. Is it enough to draw from photos and books or should I make drawing still life drawing part of my daily practice?
    Though I don't know if it's true, but in a photo your work is already half done so I wouldn't wonder if it doesn't stick to your brain as well.
    Also the benefit of life drawing is that you can easily (unless you are drawing a landscape, which might take some walking) get the same thing from different angles, something that's much harder or impossible with a photo. (unless your real life beetle flies away or something).

    "I eat comics and poop stylization"
    Comic!
    Sketchbook (Critiques, no compliments please.)
    Tumblr
    Website
    Livejournal
    DeviantArt
    Reply With Quote Reply With Quote  

Members who have read this thread: 16

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •