Art: Graphite Sketches.....
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  1. #1
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    Question Graphite Sketches.....

    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:56 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:58 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    The first two are beautiful, and the shading in all three is great. The portrait needs a little work, mainly with the eyes and chin. The eyes are too big and the chin is too close to the mouth, making it look too small and smushed. Practice the proportions of the face and you'll be fine.

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    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:57 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:57 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    not bad, not bad at all, but id suggest adding some more texture, and less blending with the values, the stuff is too smooth to be really realistic - work on those fine unblended lines, because they are in many more places than just the hair

    "You don't really question things when you're stupid"
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    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:56 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    The last feline looks especilly good. One thing though, is the right pupil missing or has a specule gone over it?

    The portrait could use some work, but one part to that is probably just practicing portraits more often.

    The still life looks good and the referenced ones look great.

    Hope you'll be posting more soon :chug:

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    Last edited by MoFra; April 23rd, 2004 at 09:57 PM.
    I am not completely insane, some parts are still missing...
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    usefulness

    It depends on what you want to be doing with your art, but the skills you chose to develop don't transfer well into other applications. It's best to spend less effort focusing on texturing and surfaces and more on your underdrawing. This will allow you to understand spacial relationships better as well as the relationships of the drawing to the frame containing it. If you go back and work on those more basic parts of drawing ( work on your gesture and blocking in of forms and dividing the drawing space) it will really make the work you have put into making those texture come alive.

    Even if you work from a reference ( especially from a reference) you need to plan the drawing out very carefully before hand.

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    Re: usefulness

    Originally posted by LaGuardian
    It depends on what you want to be doing with your art, but the skills you chose to develop don't transfer well into other applications. It's best to spend less effort focusing on texturing and surfaces and more on your underdrawing. This will allow you to understand spacial relationships better as well as the relationships of the drawing to the frame containing it. If you go back and work on those more basic parts of drawing ( work on your gesture and blocking in of forms and dividing the drawing space) it will really make the work you have put into making those texture come alive.

    Even if you work from a reference ( especially from a reference) you need to plan the drawing out very carefully before hand.
    To sort of add to this, the picture with the bottle clearly shows that you could use some work with understanding the underlying structure of the objects. Instead of the ellipses getting more 'round' as they approach the bottom of the bottle, they're actually getting flatter, which is contradictory.

    Here are some helpful quotes from Nathan Goldstein's The Art of Responsive Drawing that might guide you:

    "Experienced artists, even before they ask themselves, 'What does the subject look like?' ask, 'What is the subject doing?' That is, how does the arrangement of major parts of the figure, the flower, the lamp, or the landscape allude to movement?'"

    "Good drawings do not result from an accumulation of details; they arise from an underlying armature that suggests the subject's basic design and structure."

    "The earlier we establish the formal relationships - the system of abstract harmonies and contrast that constitute a particular drawing's organizational system - the more integrated and complete the drawing will be."

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