Sketchbook: Brandon returns (dinosaurs, ancient warriors, and studies) - Page 5

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  1. #121
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    You have a thing for cowhide bucklers, don't ye?
    Keep on practicing mate, the results as of now seem very promising.

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  3. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerah View Post
    You have a thing for cowhide bucklers, don't ye?
    Cowhide really was a common material for shields in the Nile Valley and other cultures, so that's why it appears often in my art.

    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
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  4. #123
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    I'm really glad to see your keeping up with your studies. The fact that you have made some backround research for your warrior studies makes your sketchbook all the more interesting to watch. For example the fact that cowhide was commonly used for shields was completely new to me and very interesting.

    I saw you mentioning that you had some trouble of rendering the ball of the nose. I think there's only one cure to it and that is to get better understanding of shading.

    I think you will find this page helpfull:

    http://www.huevaluechroma.com/021.php

    Keep up the good work!

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  6. #124
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    Thanks for the link. It's interesting how it turns out that the highlight isn't supposed to directly face the light source as many people think.

    Here's another question related to anatomy: what's the best method for drawing hands? Like many other beginning artists, I've always struggled with them.

    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
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  7. #125
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    Hi Brandon,

    Thanks for stopping by my sketchbook, and for the comments! Appreciate it.

    Looks like you are having fun drawing and are on the right track for improving your figures with those anatomy studies, so well done and keep at it!

    With regards to your question about how to draw the ball of the nose and make it look 3d, this really comes back to understanding forms (such as spheres, cubes, cylinders etc) and how they are affected by different lighting conditions: the ball of the nose will look different depending on how the light is hitting it. I would definitely recommend getting Loomis book 'Successful Drawing' and spending a bit of time with that and it will really help clarify things.

    All the best!

    Kris

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  8. #126
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    I second Lightpunk's book suggestion.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brandon Pilcher View Post
    Here's another question related to anatomy: what's the best method for drawing hands? Like many other beginning artists, I've always struggled with them.
    There's loads of tutorials out there and good books to study from (Loomis is always a good choice) but there's only one way to learn hands properly and that's to study hard. Repeat repeat repeat...and repeat. The good thing is that model is always near one just has to study and see how it moves.

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  10. #127
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    this is looking good you're definately productive, and thats half the battle right theree. it might help if you slow down and take your time on your drawing, do some drawing from life and anatomy studies, and draw draw draw

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  11. #128
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    just passing by and I'd like to see you draw an ancient european soldier

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  12. #129
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    While taking a temporary break from anatomy studies, I did these studies of warriors' shields from historical cultures around the world. While looking up the different types of shields, I noticed some regional trends:

    1) African shields come in a variety of shapes (although rectangular and oval forms predominate), but they're often made from some kind of animal hide (especially cowhide).

    2) Middle Eastern shields are usually circular (although the shield used in the Sumerian phalanx was rectangular).

    3) European shields can be either rectangular or circular, and they're usually made from wood. The exceptions to the latter rule are Greek and Macedonian shields which were usually metal.

    4) Far Eastern shields tend to be more rectangular and very often are long and narrow. However, a few Chinese shields (not shown here) are circular.

    5) Native American shields are circular as a general rule and often have feathers attached to the bottom rim. The Inca however had both circular and rectangular shields.

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  13. #130
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    Interesting stuff. I was thinking that you could buy some dinosaur toys or something (like the old Jurassic Park ones that were awesome), or something even older, and draw from those.

    Keep at it.

    Sketchbook: There and Back again Updated- 7/04/12
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  14. #131
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    Someone recommended in another thread that I try shading a humanoid block figure, so I did just that:

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  15. #132
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    More leg muscle studies, this time experimenting with shading and different angles:

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  16. #133
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    Hey Brandon, I can see your passion on drawing people, but do not worry about anatomy too much just focus on proportions. www.kindgirls.com would be great practice for you because there are tons of reference for you. And use a figure drawing book and an anatomy book to help you.

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  18. #134
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    A study of how the arm twists, with emphasis on elbow position during supination and pronation.

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  19. #135
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    can't say i've seen many studies like those of the shields.

    but a little advice, since you're making a lot of studies:

    don't forget to train your mind. go crazy in some pictures

    The borders of your imagination are the borders of your world.

    My Sketchbook

    My Deviant Art feel free to contact me.

    http://www.ctrlpaint.com/ so worth watching (free tutorials), even the basics are covered!
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  21. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eludor View Post
    don't forget to train your mind. go crazy in some pictures
    I don't understand what you're saying here. Do you mean something among the lines of being more creative in my studies?

    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
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  22. #137
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    Anyway, some sphere-shading practice:

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  23. #138
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    great sketchbook man. I think its great to see your progress and how much work you do... the head studies look really good. would like to see you tackle some other subject topics too.

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  24. #139
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    More limb studies:

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  25. #140
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    Two T. Rex limb studies:

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  26. #141
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    King/chieftain from predynastic Egypt:

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  27. #142
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    hey Brandon, thanks for stopping by my sketchbook. Your studies are looking good, and the fully colored Triceratops looks nice. Keep up the good work.

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  28. #143
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    Looks good in here. Just don't forget to draw from life as well as from anatomy books.

    "I've got ham, but I'm not a hamster"

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  29. #144
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    Hi Brandon.

    I can see some improvement here, keep up with the anatomy studies though some of your figures are a little off still.

    "don't forget to train your mind. go crazy in some pictures" I think this guy meant go in and enjoy some of your pictures and shade em up or stick them in a bigger image, or just throw your imagination at it and see what happens.

    Keep at it buddy and all the best to you.

    A great kind hearted lumbering bullock



    http://conceptart.org/forums/showthread.php?t=209918 = my Sketchbook
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  30. #145
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    I was watching a top 50 greatest sfx movie scenes and in it was the trex from jurassic park. Maybe others have mentioned this before but what could be really good is to just take movies/documentaries and make a lot of quick sketches of cool dino/human shots to gain understanding of their size relations in different poses.

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  31. #146
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    Weeks have passed since I last picked up my sketchbook. I notice that my urge to draw fluctuates with time. Sometimes I go through phases where I do a LOT of drawing and then I stop drawing for a few weeks. Anyone else experience this?

    While browsing through photos of East African warriors to find a good ref for this Egyptian warrior's pose, I notice that most of them tend to look rather lean with only a little muscle definition rather than the brawny bodybuilder types we Westerners associate with warriors. I'm not sure if it's because East African tribespeople don't get enough to eat or if they simply don't bother with building up muscle when training for battle. I aimed to depict that East African slimness as accurately as possible when drawing my Egyptian, but I don't know if it came out right.

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  32. #147
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    1) An elf male/human female couple.

    2) Some skin tone swatches for coloring humans of various ethnic backgrounds in GIMP. For the highlights, I added white at 30% opacity to the midtone color, whereas the shadows had black at the same opacity.

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  33. #148
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    You're making progress, but...

    DON'T use white to highlight, and do not use black for shadows/shading...instead, reflect the colours of the surroundings in the drawing, whether it be a field or a simple backdrop, and use it in your lights and darks as well as local colour...

    Also, Keep it up with both studies and your imaginative works.

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  35. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by Featheredface View Post
    DON'T use white to highlight, and do not use black for shadows/shading...instead, reflect the colours of the surroundings in the drawing, whether it be a field or a simple backdrop, and use it in your lights and darks as well as local colour...
    I remember being advised to use white and black for highlighting and shading by a DeviantArt tutorial I consulted once, but I guess that was just a case of the blind leading the blind.

    Everything is better with dinosaurs.
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  36. #150
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    Three portraits each representing my take on one of the classic fantasy races (elves, orcs, and humans). I might use this as concept art for a story someday.

    Now I need to do more studies...

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