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  1. #53
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    Another T. Rex:

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  3. #54
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    A couple of anthropology-themed drawings for this post...

    The first one is a portrait of a Homo erectus that I drew for my anthropology professor several weeks ago, while the second is an Australopithecus I drew this morning. I used a reference for the first but not the second one, so the australopithecine's anatomy is almost certainly off, but I am proud of his pose.

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  4. #55
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    hey mate, thanks for posting in my SB. Try and stick to basic principles first. i.e all your studies which include anatomy, proportions, perspective, drawing from life which include various objects such as cubes, spheres, chairs... anything. This will improve your visual perception which will carry through in all your drawings naturally. It's easy to just try and do what you want do, which of course is important, but without building the basic foundations and core principles of your drawing skills, it will only disadvantage your learning curve and progress. I hope that helps mate, keep working hard.

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  5. #56
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    The anatomy studies looks good... Your own stuff not so much but it's natural, a whole figure is much harder than some study based on a good reference.
    I advise to do a lot of gesture studies
    And skull and head studies Skulls are not only awesome (I'm a skull fan ) but they are vital to draw humanoid heads convincingly.

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  6. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by shiNIN View Post
    The anatomy studies looks good... Your own stuff not so much but it's natural, a whole figure is much harder than some study based on a good reference.
    The problem I have is knowing how muscles will look on a given pose. They twist around and contract so much, and then there's all the interactions between them. That sort of stuff doesn't show up very well in most anatomy diagrams, not even Loomis's.

    I advise to do a lot of gesture studies
    I've received that advice before, but I'm not sure what a good gesture study is supposed to look like. And what kind of subjects should I use, photos or moving people (I have a lot of difficulty with the latter, and studying them carefully would mean staring at them for enough time to make them uncomfortable).

    Skulls are not only awesome (I'm a skull fan ) but they are vital to draw humanoid heads convincingly.
    I've found that it's easier to draw human heads if you imagine the skull underneath the skin and facial muscles, so I agree.

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  7. #58
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    I'm not sure your process for your more finished pieces but I think it would help if you built the body up with smaller parts and lines, just the way you did with your studies. It would help keep things more solid and well grounded.

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    "This is a paint and pixel-splattered furnace that forges the swords of artistic mastery. This is a place where swarthy and belligerent dwarves drink turpentine mead, berate their apprentices and slap the trade into their skulls. It's where the anvils are made of graphite, the hammers are as true as rectangular marquee selections and the fires burn with the light of a thousand lensflares." --Jason Rainville
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  8. #59
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    Thanks for posting at my stuff, I browsed through your works and I see that every Egyptian is a 'lil better than the previous one . I think that with the Egyptian woman you could have forshortened(is that the word? ) her back a little and then shoulders would look more convincing, now her head is in an almost impossible twist.

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  9. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by wooden mango View Post
    I'm not sure your process for your more finished pieces but I think it would help if you built the body up with smaller parts and lines, just the way you did with your studies. It would help keep things more solid and well grounded.
    That's actually what I do right now.

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  10. #61
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    hey man keep up the anatomy and loomis stuff. maybe try doing some full body studies aswell would be awesome! keep it up man

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  11. #62
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    This African village was supposed to be an exercise in drawing landscapes, but I had trouble figuring out how big the huts should appear relative to each other (they're all supposed to be the same size, but obviously some would appear larger due to being closer to the viewer).

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  12. #63
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    Try working on facial proportions and variety, there are a huge range of facial features- pointy noses, different shaped eyes- different shapes between the features, thin lips and thicker lips. I think overall your work could be improved if you took some time out (more than a couple of hours, preferably) to work on your rendering, just the way you draw your lines etc- try cross-hatching. I don't have much (if any) experience, so feel free to disregard any of this, but one thing that really helped me was reading and doing some studies from Giovanni Civardi - Drawing Portraits Faces And Figures. I think you can get a PDF online for free, just do some googling. Keep trying to improve your work each time, and keep changing/fixing the mistakes you are making.

    One last thing- don't be too quick to stylize- try and look carefully at your work and compare it to the things you are referencing from when doing some studies, the more realistic/accurate you try and make your work the more you will learn.

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  13. #64
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    Just a portrait I did for fun a couple of hours ago...

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  14. #65
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    by the way, for shading I typically start with a 2H, and work my way darker, up to about a 6B.

    I dislike mechanical pencils because when you work them long enough, part of the point gets really blunt, and you get a very sharp point on the end which will cut the paper if you're not careful. Plus it's usually a darker stroke since it's an extremely fine point. I do want to try that new pencil where when you lift the pencil, it rotates the graphite so you never get that sharp part of the point.

    As for brands, Staedtler Mars, Windsor-Newton, Kimberly, Derwent - they all work. There's others that are good too though. I sometimes cross brands, but dont forget that a 2B from Kimberly and a 2B from Derwent (or any brand) might not and probably won't be the exact same shade.

    Doctors heal you, Artists immortalize you.

    "Those who can, do. Those who can't, teach" - bullshit.

    The usual staples for anatomy:
    George Bridgman
    Joseph Sheppard
    Andrew Loomis
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